PCs

Gallery: Vintage computers on the auction block

This is a Zarach sphere television from 1975. It was sold by the exclusive designer shop Zarach in London's Sloane Square and is expected to sell for at least £1,500 ($2,394) in the auction.

In the Bonhams catalogue Michael Bennett-Levy says of the television: "Acquiring this set for the collection was a 'must' but in order to prise it out of the seller I was forced to buy his entire collection of another 14 televisions too!"

SOLD for £3,960 ($6,320).

Photo credit: Bonhams

13 comments
jfuller05
jfuller05

Tank Attack is a great game. Pong? Eh, I was bored with it after a few minutes.

yooper
yooper

As most of you know, there's a TON of other brands and types of computers that could have been mentioned, i.e Altair 8080, etc. I still have my Commodore64 along with many others.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

these specific pieces of hardware were available at a recent hardware auction. It wasn't intended as a general pictorial of older systems.

yooper
yooper

Duly noted, thanks.

PromptJock
PromptJock

Someone needs to do their homework. The GEC V500H ** IS NOT ** a "Laserdisc" player - it is a "CED (Capacitive Electrostatic Discharge)" videodisc player! It was conceived by RCA as a cheap alternative to the then "cutting-edge" Pioneer LaserDisc player. The CED discs were "pressed graphite" discs, not "reflective" polycarbonate like real Laserdiscs. The "platters" were stored in a carrier sleeve (what you actually touched, with the cover art, etc.). To play a CED disc, you inserted the whole sleeve into the machine (where the main unit "grabbed" the platter), and then you pulled the empty sleeve out (you reinserted the sleeve to retrieve the disc when done - bare fingers ** NEVER, EVER ** touched the disc proper!). They were "played" by passing a STYLUS (think: phonograph needle, ala vinyl music platters) over the disc, the audio was MONOPHONIC (not STEREO) and the picture was comparable to that from a VCR fed through the TV tuner. The units didn't sell as once people compared them to the Pioneer machines, they agreed the Pioneers were better machines. Laserdisc machines survived until the late 90's when DVD finally supplanted them. While you can still purchase DVD/LD/CD "combi" machines from Pioneer (for a price, of course!), Laserdiscs are no longer being produced - you have to try and find the jewels on eBay, flea markets, etc. I still own a mess of Laserdiscs and a player, primarily because many of the titles I have do not have DVD equivalents (yet?).

Tank252ca
Tank252ca

You want vintage? :) We still have an IBM 5110 Model 2, including the large floor standing 8" dual floppy drive, that we keep on display just for fun. Same as the one pictured here http://www.vintage-computer.com/ibm5110.shtml it came with a BASIC interpreter built in and we ran all of our mortgage software off of several 8" floppies. I was hired to migrate from this system to an IBM PC. Used to have the original printer too, in good working order, but it got lost after a couple of moves. That gear was rugged as nails and still works today. Also have a Sharp MZ-100 portable, but without the power brick http://www.flickr.com/photos/bcostin/110944328/ based on the 8088 cpu. Surprised to see that someone on Ebay is actually asking $300 for one of these.

gwhaler
gwhaler

Atari? Power Without The Price!

reg_techrepublic
reg_techrepublic

The computer on the right in image 4 is most definitely NOT a Commodore 64. The Commodore 64 had the entire computer (CPU, memory, etc.) in the keyboard unit and came with no monitor (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_64). If I am not mistaken, the computer in this image is a Commodore PET.

larrysinagub
larrysinagub

Your right about the pet, but wrong about the 64. Commodore made an SX-64. It was a portable 64 with a built in 5" color monitor and floppy drive. I've got one. Used it for years, especially during my early years in the Navy. Took it with me on board ship.

fred.archer.ctr
fred.archer.ctr

No, it's not a PET. The PETs were an all in one with a built-in tape drive. This is a portable of some sort. Unfortunately, I cna't enlarge the image to read the name on the lower right edge of the screen.

eric
eric

This is the TRS-80 Model 4P. A luggable, quite rugged, expandable to 128K, and with DD/DS drives and optional hi-res sufficient for fractals and detailed portraits. It ran the nine OSs made for the M4 line, plus CP/M. A great machine for its time, but left in the dust after Tandy didn't or couldn't implement a Z-800 version. =Eric

freaknout
freaknout

Wow, the sphere tv is steam punk before they knew what is was

homemade
homemade

Image 5 pictures Sinclairs. It duplicates image 2. Text for image mentions red LED calculators. Pls withdraw this when correction made.