Leadership

Gallery: What's brewing inside Microsoft Research?

Microsoft Research also works with scientists to boost understanding around various natural processes. This shows a project to develop a visual programming language for simulating and analysing complex biological models.

The Antigen Presentation case study (shown here) is a collaboration between Cambridge and Southampton universities and is aimed at better understanding cancer and autoimmune disease.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson/silicon.com

7 comments
a.mathur
a.mathur

Microsoft, open your eyes and look around what's already there in excellent mapping. axpand is the next big thing in verctor based maps

shifterracer
shifterracer

2 or 3 things are pretty cool, the rest appear to be a waste of money.

cory.schultze
cory.schultze

The biological visual model project is a good idea. I'm not sure if the Everest project will float. The mobile gaming and file sharing device is about the most likely to succeed out of all the home-user devices, but it's way too large and most modern mobile (cell) phones can do these things already. The photo box thing a total waste - so you haul a bulky device with you on holiday to take pictures, only to show them to friends and family but you have to sort through the pictures and rotate or flip them to find the ones you want? And a digital camera does what? You can take AND share them with a mobile phone! You then need the storage space for this junk, but you already have a PC or laptop which does 1,000,000 things, including viewing and organising pictures? And the Whereabouts CROCK - spend your oh-so-disposable income on a glorified cork board to tell your family what they already know? Same goes for the touchscreen tracker - who cares that Joe Bloggs is in the john and John Smith is in the local Tesco getting the Pot Noodle for his lunch? And who really needs a picture to represent these things? I'm not sure about the Surface technology; it seems very innovative, but where would it be used? What can it be used with? Can it be shrunk-down in size and cost? What advantage does it have over a notebook with the necessary presentation applications and a single projector? Answers on a postcard.

marylou.vonwyl
marylou.vonwyl

it's not necessarily a waste of money to dig into new ideas. Everything we use on a daily basis started out as an idea that took shape over time. Building prototypes is part of the process. The big question is whether or not there are any truly original ideas left?

TechRepublic
TechRepublic

Okay, I can see value in the Everest bits - making computers more effecient - especially those that can go to low power states due to limited time utilization. And wearable cameras for Alzimer patients - I think the University of South Florida is already doing something like this with much smaller devices and with few dollars spent. The rest of it just seems like its is way behind apps available right now - need to know where a company is in a building - check their website. I don't need vitrual x-ray vision through the building, just tell me which floor to get off of the elevator on. Need augmented documentation - Corbis did an interesting project with da Vinci's Codex Leister (sp?) where the backwards writing in Italian was decoded virtually - without the use of a huge box, multiple projectors, and clear plastic. This all looks like 'dancing baloney' that a team of marketing managers think people want and not real functionality that anyone actually wants.

freaknout
freaknout

Theres no way there are any original ideas left. Everything has already been done and perfected so were as good as it gets.......Sorry

freaknout
freaknout

The same things were said when 3M was developing a permanent adhesive and it was a failure except that turned out to be post it note glue. Sometimes playing around can produce some pretty useful stuff if you think outside the box a little.