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HP TouchPad: Unboxing, screenshots, and comparison photos

HP TouchPad: Unboxing, screenshots, and comparison photos

Take a look at the HP TouchPad from every angle in TechRepublic's all-inclusive gallery that includes unboxing, screenshots, and comparison photos next to the iPad and Android tablets.

Full review: HP TouchPad leapfrogs rivals in productivity

Photo credit: Jason Hiner | TechRepublic

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

9 comments
Lu Johnson
Lu Johnson

Every article about tablets goes this same way.... fanboi of this attacking fanboi of that. Jeez! first the constant rerun DRONE of the PC and MAC argument....Now the TABLET vs. PC argument.... Good God this gets so frazzizzlingly effing OLD. So I'll just say it. To all COMMENTORS of stories everywhere: Y'all are stupid poopie-pee-pee potty pants.

jeltez42
jeltez42

For this tablet to be useful in the business world it needs to have a MS compatible office suite. Did not see that in your review. Looks better than the Android OS but that is not saying all that much. As for Apple, the iPads are barely acceptable for a child's toy. Realistically, this is just another fad.

Jay Purple
Jay Purple

You said iPad 2 twice, but I think you mean iPad 2, iPad 1... etc... Cant wait for the Teardown, hehe.

Dragonxlog
Dragonxlog

You should comment to commenters that don't know there facts, not ALL commenters in general, otherwise you are commenting yourself, as a so called.. "Stupid poopie-pee-pee potty pants." :P think before you say. so WELCOME TO OUR STUPID CLUB THEN

blakjak.au
blakjak.au

It's not a fad, it's the end of the PC/laptop era. It's not that tablets are the idea form-factor in every situation, they simply aren't. However, tablets ARE the ideal form-factor in many situation where a PC or laptop simply can't operate, let alone compete. How does this end PCs? it doesn't. Not on it's own. There are tasks that you really can't do on the touchscreen interface of a tablet/smartphone. You really can't do serious typing (coding, word processing etc.) you really can't do even moderate image manipulation but that's only a limitation of the input method, not a lack of processing power, or memory. The next step (and it's about to arrive) is the ubiquitous computing device. One device (tablet/smartphone) that you do all your computing on (and with the line between tablets and smartphones become very blurry, you'll almost certainly have a choice of device sizes). It's a tablet/smartphone when your on the go, but get back to your desk and dock it and it's now your PC. Not old-fashioned docking, data-syncing your phone to your PC, but docking your tablet/smartphone with a screen+keyboard+mouse do utilize the processor and storage as though it were a PC/laptop. Hackers (i.e. tech geeks) have made working implementations of the idea when Google Nexus came out, running a full linux desktops on the snapdragon is quite acceptable. Now Motorola have bought into the idea with the Atrix, running a "webtop" OS when docked and Apple Air lets you do the same with your iPad. It's only a matter of time before this "fad" is commonplace and the only people not using this tech daily will be those who need massive CPU grunt for A/V multimedia editing, CAD work and compiling code.

I12BPhil
I12BPhil

Child's toy? Yeah, that's why the Army, Navy and a majority of airlines have started using them for tactical reasons and flight plans and hospitals and universities have implemented them to make inputting data easier. Because they like toys.

Dragonxlog
Dragonxlog

The majority of computer users out there are usually ALL GAMERS, tablets lack the design and hardware to play heavy games. If PC or Laptops were to go away... figure this... no servers.. no databases, no file sharing... that's a PC. So it is not the end. Desktop Towers still have the higher end for performances and cost the same.

MacNewton
MacNewton

Apples iPad 2 is mostly used at this time. The Army uses Apple products for a host of reasons. They're durable, easy to use in the field, tough to hack, and readily available (unlike many specialized computer hardware items). They've been known to use iPods Touch as simple translation tools (they can translate and say "get down!" in Arabic--useful in our worldwide exportation of freedom!). So what went on in Cupertino? Apple officials gave the Army group tours of its laboratories and other facilities and talked about some examples of where the military is already using Apple technology. The Army's research and development command is evaluating commercial hand-held solutions such as iPad, iPhone, iPod, iMac, and MacBook platforms.