Hardware

Intel celebrates 40 years of chipmaking (photos)

8 comments
jagans65
jagans65

I have to admit that my first real computer was a Mac Plus. I owned a commodore 64 but soon tired of it. I really thought that the Motorola based RISC Processor was going to run away with the industry. Good thing I didn't bet the farm on that one.

DOSlover
DOSlover

I have a nostalgic memory of the first computer I bought which was a (the) first Pentium at 60 MHz, not the 66 MHz shown. What was really impressive was Intel ordered a worldwide recall for an obscure floating point error and replaced them at absolutely no cost. The service standard and treatment from Intel is one more than a few other industries could learn from. Since then I have always been confident of intel products and impressed that they do more than just hardware. I hope they continue long into the future and continue to provide incentives for the processor (and IT) market long into the future.

paulfx1
paulfx1

I've a lot of these ICs in my electronics cache. Although for value I have to admit when I buy new it usually isn't Intel I go to. I built an i3 last year because I got a nice deal on it but as I look around now it seems we've wasted the whole time between then, and today. I couldn't build the same system presently for as cheap as I did. That to me is going backwards. Looking at this gallery of microprocessors reminds me that Intel games the market whenever it can. They'll never release a new product without a damned good economic reason to do so. In the beginning engineers ran the company, now bean counters and marketing droids do. Good for shareholders I guess. Dumb, dumb, da, dumb!

jisampedro
jisampedro

Since my first PC (Pentium 100), always relied in Intel chips and it has been a really good choice. More to come in the next years, and sure my next one will be Intel powered. Felicidades Intel!

HAL 9000
HAL 9000 moderator

As I've used all but 1 of those Chips and the one I have not used was the i5 which is because the i7 was available and it was just better for the job I was doing. Read that as More Power. ;) What should also have been included is the Intel Chips that support these CPU's as without them all of the Pictured CPU's would have been useless. Intel had the right idea from the Get Go they made the Entire Package which is where AMD fell down in the beginning. They just made the CPU and hoped that others would make a [i]"Good Enough"[/i] Chip Set for the M'Boards that these got mounted on and it's official no one did. AMD finally got the idea that they had to also make the Complete Package if they wanted to remain competitive and at long last they are, though now they [b]"Officially"[/b] don't make anything they are just a Design House who sell their Designs to other Makers which is a good enough reason for me to refuse to use their products. As things stand now Intel makes the Complete Package and the Competition can start making Intel Chip Sets at any point in time if they are offered the right incentive. Under those circumstances who in their right mind would consider AMD as a Long Term Alternative? Col

pgit
pgit

At age 12 I picked up my dad's Scientific American magazine, drawn by one of those shimmering color images of the 4004 chip on the cover. (Like the 386 image, # 14) Since that issue I read Scientific American cover to cover, every issue until I wrote the new editor when they went pure corporate property sometime in the late 90's, telling him basically "so long, and thanks for all the fish." He wrote back, reading between the lines he knew I was right: the magazine was politicized from that point forward. (but a job is a job, and editing that mag is a good-un) But reading about that chip that day in my dad's library... I was sold on computers from that day forward. I bought the first "laptop" the Tandy 100. I bought the first 286 based laptop available, the next a P-II. I obtained a used P-III lappy, then quickly started to obtain "old" laptops from my clients buying the biggest-bestest new stuff. For a while I was not far behind the curve. I currently have a core 2 duo, a couple athalon and turion dual cores and an i5 desktop. But from the get go I was a "laptop man" through and through. I figured, what good is all this power, in such a small package, if that package was tied down to the power grid? It helped that I was a professional aviator... BTW I justified my flight department using all kinds of data and a Tandy spread sheet app on that 80286 laptop for a number of touch and go economic years. I was able to prove to the CEOs, and they their boards of directors, that they saved money (big time) owning/operating their own aircraft. I doubt I could have done that with pencil and paper. Thank you Intel, thank you Dr. Moore, and thanks to the competition (AMD) for keeping things honest!

wagaobr
wagaobr

My job include Z80 from Zilog and 8052 from Apple and comming Intel with the 8080, 8086 e and 8088in in a project from Siemens (EWSD). I remenber this like today. Congratulation to Intel they make our job easy. (sorry to my english)

Junckes
Junckes

Intel is to be congratulated. They contributes greatly to the advancement of technology and made ??????our lives much better and connected