Hardware

Intel Museum showcases history of the microprocessor

Intel Museum

Located in the Robert Noyce Building at Intel's headquarters in in Santa Clara, the Intel Museum showcases many of the company's most significant achievements in computer history.

Josh Bancroft visited the museum in 2006 and took these photos. He graciously allowed us to republish them on TechRepublic.

Photo by Josh Bancroft

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Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

10 comments
texasitpro777
texasitpro777

I was a contractor at INTEL Santa Clara in 2008. The museum had old stuff, not even a dual or quad processor or laptop on display. Maybe they got exhibits from Goodwill or a scrap yard. Nothing or recent invention! Sad comment but true. Yet more Far East visitors than North Americans!

parksdevcorp
parksdevcorp

I had one of these on my desk when I worked there in '86. Programmed in assembler and PLM. Fun times.

cace@utp.edu.co
cace@utp.edu.co

Curious quote, "Changing the way we work, learn and play": is the same that Cisco says. ?Which was first?.

JCitizen
JCitizen

that in one of the phone exhibits marked "some phones with intel chips", their was what looked like an 1880's original Bell phone. Now that was pretty good - Intel must have a time machine to go back and put chips in those old crank phones! HA! :ar!

schoenjo
schoenjo

Intel's price per mflops has increased exponentially also.

phineas
phineas

I clicked on the link to see slides from the Intel Museum and what is the first thing I see is a full screen ad for AMD. I have been a big fan of the Intel processor since the days of the 386 when I had problems with compatibility issues with AMD and Cyrix processors. I thought I was in the wrong place and if I was Intel I wouldn't be very unhappy.

computer
computer

Can not read text of display. This is same short coming of rest of slides. Topic is of real interest to me as I taught computer technology for repair purposes and this is the "geeky" stuff that I love to see.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler moderator

If you click each image a larger version (1024 X 768) should appear. This will help you read some of the text. Unfortunately, the text on some exhibits is just too small to read via a photo these photographs.

vaughanm
vaughanm

But not everyone is rich and braggy