Nasa / Space

NASA spacecraft and aircraft in flight

Apollo 11 Launch

Recapture some moments in NASA history by viewing these photographs of iconic spacecraft and aircraft taking flight.

These photos are taken from NASA's new Commons page on Flickr. For more information, read "NASA brings historic photos to Flickr Commons."

All photos, titles, and captions are courtesy of NASA.

About

Sonja Thompson has worked for TechRepublic since October of 1999. She is currently a Senior Editor and the host of the Smartphones and Tablets blogs.

30 comments
mwclarke1
mwclarke1

Trying to go through all the photos is nail biting. It seems like re-loading much of other content on the page, sometimes will pop right up but almost every other picture takes time to load ? I give up

SkyNet42
SkyNet42

After the shuttle is retired, memories will be all we have left.

davebrik99
davebrik99

It's too bad Obama has scotched the moon program. I skipped work in 1969 to watch Apollo 11. I would have thought AMERICA would have been on Mars by now........instead of turning into a welfare state.... yeah we've done some great things, but there is a bitterness.

dfarrich
dfarrich

Having worked on some components at the R&D level for the Saturn V booster and the first lunar landing, this excites me to see that someone still cares enough to assemble this. NASA is the most awesome and comitted organization that has contributed more to the technical development of humankind than has ever existed. Dave

Tushar Panjwani
Tushar Panjwani

i love space sooo much and i even feel that after sometime(long time) we all will be transferred to other planet

shane013a
shane013a

I think having another American flag in another picture is getting too jingoistic for me. Are you so afraid of what would happen if you didn't have the cross-threat present? How would it be if people were allowed to enjoy pictures of things which gave them joy absent of reminders of pain...I know I'm asking too much.

glenstorm_98
glenstorm_98

The guy way over on the right (in pic #2, with the King and Queen of Belgium) sure looks like Hubert Humphrey. Glad you're running these various photo stories. They make a nice diversion in the middle of a crazy day! -Dw

prendeda
prendeda

Great pics - are these images copyright or can we use them (select ones) in presentations please?

andrewbadera
andrewbadera

Would be nice to have these easily usable as desktop background slideshow shots ...

NickNielsen
NickNielsen moderator

And don't really care. [i]How would it be if people were allowed to enjoy pictures of things which gave them joy absent of reminders of pain...[/i] I don't think that can happen for anybody. Every picture I have of the good times also brings to mind memories of bad times. Yes, these images celebrate the triumphs of the American space program. But I can't see shuttle launch pictures without thinking of the Challenger crew. I can't see a picture of a Saturn V launch without thinking of the Apollo I astronauts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_1). I don't see pictures of aircraft without being reminded that people died testing them. That's life: there's good and there's bad. You deal with it. If seeing the American flag causes you that much pain, it must be hell for you to walk down the street.

CalTec
CalTec

See description here... Kennedy Space Center Deputy Director for Administration, Albert Siepert, seated at left on third row, points out highlights of Apollo 10 liftoff to Belgiums King Baudouin and Queen Fabiola. Next to the queen is Mrs. Siepert. Former Vice President Hubert Humphrey, in baseball cap at right, talks with Mr. And Mrs. Emil Mosbacher, seated next to him. Mr. Mosbacher is the Chief of U.S. Protocol. http://tinyurl.com/28a2xam

ryburnj
ryburnj

I'm nearly certain you're right about that.

seanferd
seanferd

Although I'm not encountering any difficulty downloading them here. edit: You can find tons of stuff through the NASA site and its affiliates (JPL, various universities, etc.).

gwd3
gwd3

...Of the launches and other NASA flights I've seen. I'm from Houston, Texas and graduated from Clear Creek HS in League City, Texas, which is only 5 minutes away from LBJ Space Center. In 1980, our school was ordered outside and we got to witness the fly-over of the Space Shuttle Enterprise strapped to the back of a modified 747. It was low enough to read the lettering on the shuttle. In 1981, while serving in the Navy and stationed at Orlando NTC, I got to witness the STS 1 liftoff of the Enterprise which was glorious and we all cheered. In 1983, while ported in Cape Canaveral on board the USS Florida SSBN 728 (we were testing our Trident missile launch after commissioning), I witnessed a couple of satellite rocket launches and the STS 8 launch of the Challenger (she later exploded in 1986 - the country's first shuttle disaster) I agree with another poster that kids nowadays take our Space Shuttle program for granted because there have been so many launches and it's become a normal part of life, but the early days of the Shuttle program were thrilling and awe-inspiring to me. I now live near Vandenberg in SLO, and when I worked at Diablo Canyon, we were treated to sat rockets being launched periodically - I still got goose bumps from watching those.

Chris_Muncy
Chris_Muncy

These do bring back memories for us aged guys. I regret that I will never be able to see a shuttle launch.

andrewbadera
andrewbadera

... and, link to flickr? I don't seem to see an actual link to the gallery. I don't have hours to spend wandering the web gathering photos unfortunately. It's enough for me to check APOD once a week as it is.

bstiff929
bstiff929

Because the rest of us saw Columbia launch on STS-1. Enterprise was an atmospheric test article. Unfortunately, it's not just the "kids nowadays" who take space flight for granted; nearly everyone does. My earliest memory of American spaceflight was Skylab's tepid success, then the delays of Shuttle. I was born the year after Mr. Armstrong (not the Armstrong who wins bike races) made footprints on the moon. I remember my terror when my high school principal announced that the Challenger launch had failed. I turned 29 the year that John Glenn went back to orbit. I couldn't believe it when we *actually started launching station parts*. I cried when Columbia, the first shuttle, didn't come home. I was inspired to see the solid-rocket-monster Ares 1-X fly, and I'll feel empty to see the end of the Space Transportation System, which has been the manned space campaign for 3/4 of my life. It's disappointing to see the lack of vision for the future. What will inspire my kids?

LandoThor
LandoThor

Amongst so many other launches, I remember as a 12 year old glued to the TV watching that beautiful Saturn 5 rocket rise up and watching the grainy view from the moon of Apollo 11 and the first moon landing.

jamie
jamie

My kids have grown up with spaceflight as the norm, even my wife who is only a few years younger than me, doesnt "get it". Even to her, we have always been in space. But I still remember the excitement, the staying up late at night to watch a lift off or landing. The whole family huddled round our TV to watch these momentous occasions. Were you like me cheering with delight when you saw Apollo 11 land in Tranquility? In the UK a few years ago - thi was voted in a national poll "The most memorable TV moment of all time" These photos have brought back wonderful memories of childhood dreams of being an astronaut, and esp the time when i was honoured and extremely priveledged to meet Michael, Buzz and Neil. OOh first names!!!!!

andrewbadera
andrewbadera

My problem was I checked the first links, or bridges as it were, and gave up; I think the fourth link, the actual link to flickr, was below the fold. Since the article linked to the NASA pages centered on that content, I figured at that point there might simply not be a direct link. And I dug around the NASA pages a bit. And I googled for "NASA flickr archive" and got a lot of noisy results.

seanferd
seanferd

Yes, I imagine it would take hours, otherwise.

gwd3
gwd3

You're right - now that you mentioned it, it was the Columbia. Something told me that may not be right but I was going on memory - that was only 30 years ago, cut me some slack :)

mrmiata7
mrmiata7

I remember watching the Apollo-11 liftoff and landing on the moon when I was 12 which my parents allowed the four of we kids to stay up and watch. I will never forget the words "Tranquility Base here, the eagle has landed". Amazing how much technology has advanced in the 40 years since. My netbook has more power than all the computers used to support the Apollo program.