Software

Office 2010 (technical preview) screenshots

33 comments
bdfonts
bdfonts

Word 2010 and Publisher 2010 also include some new OpenType font features that have not received a lot of attention. These features allow you to get creative with your text. Our company, Ascender Corp, just released a font pack that showcases these new OpenType features. The Ascender 2010 Font Pack comes with new & improved versions of Comic Sans and Trebuchet, along with a selection of decorative script and display fonts. You can read more about it here: http://www.fontmarketplace.com/font/ascender-2010-pack.aspx

boxfiddler
boxfiddler moderator

do I need each application 'theme' to be a different color if I can read? Why do I need a 'theme color' in the first place? Loons.

ragskl
ragskl

Rather disappointed with Msoft - expected a new office where single program allows you to work with document, spreadsheet, presentation, web page etc - instead of using dedicated programs (Word, Excel etc). Also expected a new document format where you can throw in tables, videos, charts, etc - so not confined to one specific type of content.

dogknees
dogknees

Are we in primary school? Send a smile! How about something meaningful and grown up like, I don't know, "provide feedback", or "make a comment"? We don't want dumber interfaces and childish terminology, we want smarter richer interfaces and succinct mature terminology. Something I read years ago that I keep in mind. Many musicians use the finger of both hands and their feet when they interface to their equipment. Why don't we have PC interfaces that are as rich and allow as much bandwidth between brain and PC? Obviously, it would take time to master, but most things do. Expend the effort, reap the reward.

Lemuelpn
Lemuelpn

I don't know and I don't want to comment right now, I'm still downloading.

p12p11
p12p11

As far as I can see, Office2007, 2010 & co are anti-piracy office editions, so poorly designed that they're not worth cracking (exempt for plain curiosity/lol purposes). Want to make an office article? Write an OpenOffice.org review!

Ron_007
Ron_007

Why does the computer media continue to shill for MS this way. Pre-beta software is still in development, subject to huge changes in look, feel and function. Why waste your time and ours publising it. No I didn't bother reading the article, I'm just tired of seeing this type of article all the time. These "leaks" are obvious plants by the MS publicity department. Please stop taking the bait hook line and sinker! Come ZDNet, it's time to grow up and be a source of REAL news.

yogu06
yogu06

i thnk its look like office 2007 but some thin is improved ......i gusss

victor.gutzler
victor.gutzler

Microsoft appears to be making new products fashionable instead of incorporating substantive changes in an effort to appear innovative. I am getting tired of the multitude of new releases; we are still using Office 2003 and quite satisfied to stay with it, unless MS forces the issue and drives us to try Open Office....

swohlers
swohlers

Office 2010 and 2007 may be acceptable for people who have never used office before, but for many of the people I support, they won't go beyond office 2003 unless the standard file, edit, view, (etc.) menu is available as an option. In businesses I support, people who have have had Office 2007 request to have it removed after a month or so and have 2003 installed because they don't want the ribbon method which is often more confusing and time consuming for long time users.

s.mck
s.mck

I find the new interface on Office extremely easy to use, albeit different and updated from the classic 2003-style interface. This says more about people's inability to self-motivate in regards to learning new things on the computer (I am strictly speaking of the 'average' user) than it does about the usability of the new interface.

SirWizard
SirWizard

Them's fightin' words. Some schmuck [oops, I misspelled s.mck] is calling my friends who are "average" users "unmotivated." That's a gentler way of saying they are 'lazy' because they can't use effectively a crippling, space and time-wasting, inconsistent, intransigent interface. And that's my gentler way of calling the ribbon interface 'unusable.' Yes, some Epsilon Minus users are ideally suited to the O 2007 brave new ribbon, that has such people like't!* But if it is so great, why do so many hardworking, motivated average users find it unusable?! Because it is unusable. I'll hold off about power users for a bit. If the Office 2007 ribbon contained, or could be made to contain, all the commands that Office 2003 users had readily available and required no extra keystrokes or mouse-clicks to access them, the ribbon would still be a downgrade because it costs the average user valuable screen real estate and important document status indicators. However, the ribbon does not contain important O-2003 commands that average users need. Many, if not most, O-2003 commands that were single-click accusable require two, three, or more clicks using O-2007, inducing or exacerbating repetitive motion disorders. And, especially, the interface is not customizable, excepting the 'we now hate toolbars, but left you a vestigial one to remind you what we've deprecated' joke. As the only user in the company permitted to stay with Office 2003, I was the go-to guy when users trying their best with Office 2007 couldn't get their work done. As a last resort, after they tried everything including the official ribbon command cheat-sheet, I'd tell them to email me their doc / xls / &c. files and send them back fixed using O-2003 within a minute or two. Let's talk about the real leader in lazy and unmotivated: Microsoft. What about making real improvements to the software, not just bloating up the interface? In Word, for example, they could expand the limited 'page break before' paragraph format to include odd or even page breaks. Or enlarge the Cross-reference dialog box enough to make inserting a reference easier than a horrible ordeal. Or add a way to include table cell markers in a Find and Replace search. Okay, those aren't "average" features that someone would use to dash off a quick note to say, "The ribbon is fine for the diddly-squat things I do with Office." So, on to power users. I have worked as on-site tech support, a software trainer, a user interface designer, a programmer, and other roles, but most recently, I have been an Office end user all day / every day primarily creating and editing large (for example 200+ pages), styled, fully cross-referenced user documentation. As a power user with a heavily customized set of toolbars, I can access more than 90% of all the many commands I use in Microsoft Office with a single mouse click: toggle paragraph formatting as keep-with-next or not, restart paragraph numbering, apply secondary bullet styling, condense font spacing by a tenth of a point, split table cells, increase a hanging indent to align with a tab, set a spreadsheet print area, merge cells, apply diagonal cell borders, and so on. Until Microsoft provides an option to use a classic interface instead of the ribbon, why would I possibly spend money to trade my efficiency and ease of use for a case of carpal-tunnel syndrome and smaller usable screen area?! I'm not saying Microsoft should get rid of the ribbon. Some people find it useful, and that's great for them. But don't throw away the usability, customizability, compactness, and other features of the classic toolbar interface. Microsoft should provide an interface option for one or the other. Just like the option to either use personalized menus (the ephemeral ones that show just the few most recently used commands) or full menus that show all the commands without constantly changing the interface. * Huxley and Shakespeare in one sentence!

TNT
TNT

The ribbon bar is not going away. I'm a long-time office user (since the mid 1990's) and embraced the ribbon bar. I'm glad I did, because once you're used to it it is a better way to work. As a lead IT guy in my last couple jobs I've lead training classes for the user base to show them the differences and where commonly used features have been moved to. I've also given them online resources to help them through the transition period. Out of 200 people I've upgraded I've had three ask for Office 2003 back, a request I've denied explaining to them that it is important to move forward. With a little training most everyone will get on board.

jasondlnd
jasondlnd

I get the ribbon in Office 2007, but really it hasn't improved my workflow, as a matter of fact, it's hindered it in some places. The work that I used to be able to do in Access 2003 is now impossible in Access 2007. Some of the customized menus I was able to create in Word and Excel 2003 are also impossible to create with the ribbon in 2007. I understand how the ribbon is laid out...how functions and commands are now grouped under fewer headings and how certain functions are easier to find, but some functions are sorely missing. Gone are the tools from Access that allow you to customize the look of the database to the end user. Gone is the drawing toolbar that allowed quick access to drawing features in Word. My computer at work has Office 2007 installed on it. In order to get some of my Access projects done, I've had to move to a computer running Office 2003. It's a reduction in efficiency, but at least I'm able to get the job done. There really needs an option to use the classic menus in Office 2007 in addition to the ribbon. Office 2008 for the Mac does just that, which works a lot better than using the ribbon exclusively. Sadly, there is no Access on the Mac, so I am stuck using Windows when working in Access. If it's too difficult to offer both the classic menus and the ribbon in the new versions of Office on Windows, I'd take the classic menus over the ribbon any day.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler moderator

[i]I'd take the classic menus over the ribbon any day.[/i] Waste of screen space. All minimizing the ribbon does is insure I have to click more often. Drive me up a wall.

Grafixx01
Grafixx01

Ok, we understand that MS is in the mood to constantly come out with new software and OSes but the issue is that they don't even allow their previous versions of software to catch on BEFORE they release even betas of newer versions being developed. I know a lot of people who just LOOK at Vista and MS Office 2007 on my machine and are like, "NO WAY!" I know people who use it who hate it and want 2003 back but higher-ups have decided TOUGH. One of the things that I've noticed about Office 2007 is that a lot of the functions that IT professionals need are hidden or extremely hard to find, unlike in 2003.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler moderator

I've never understood the difficulty people have with menus. Why would anyone look anywhere but 'Edit' for cut, copy, paste, or any other 'editing' options? (As a cheap, easy example.) Menu names are for the most part a dead giveaway as to what the menu contains. etu

BeBoo
BeBoo

What do you mean they don't allow their previous versions to catch on? They waited over 4 years before releasing 2007. I think thats plenty of time. Not to mention it is usually preinstalled on many new computers as a trial. I personally love 2007. Everything is much easier to get to than trying to remember what menu it was under. Just my $.02

adelacuesta
adelacuesta

Office programmers need to change the look and feel to justify the upgrade. Also to mention that it should not be backward compatible to force consumers to pay. Thanks, there's OOo alternative.

Bullmass
Bullmass

AA lot to do about not much, when will people really ask for a change that makes a real difference ? And when will Microsoft give it ?

Bullmass
Bullmass

A lot to do about not much, when will people really ask for a change that makes a real difference ? And when will Microsoft give it ?

wdewey@cityofsalem.net
wdewey@cityofsalem.net

Microsoft majorly redesigned their UI in office 2007. I am pretty certain that a lot of work and research went into that release. They were trying to make Office easier to use and more logical which is what people want, correct? Do you really want then to change the UI every release? Bill

cory.schultze
cory.schultze

Penny-Pinchers! All these new features which I doubt requires a new engine - why not just release a patch? There seems to be only one difference to the applications themselves and that seems to be window colours. How much does this suite cost?

Greg Mix
Greg Mix

IMO, they still have not given us a reason to upgrade past 2003. For personal use, I have moved to Open Office. Also, how much bigger do they plan to make the tool bars?

butkus
butkus

Isn't the object of dual monitors, one for the document, one monitor for the toolbars!

n3ur0
n3ur0

I use Office 2007, and as i went through the screenshots, i could not find any major upgrades which couldn't be included in an upgrade. There is no real upgrade like office 2000--> office 2003--> office 2007.

femtobeam
femtobeam

Thank you Zack. I heard it with MadShrimps but it is nice to see it here in this format. Thank you for taking the time.

ayazhoda
ayazhoda

Why does access screen shot says access 2007

BeBoo
BeBoo

Looks like a compatibility mode for 2007 perhaps? Did the file structure change from 2007 to 2010?

rahultkd
rahultkd

This is a very good piece of information. Thanks for the insight on Office 2010.

tom.doran
tom.doran

Once again MS implements change for the sake of change. Why do they feel a need to change the location, name and appearance of most everything every time they have a new version? Whatever they are thinking, usability is not a consideration. When you have real work to do, it is a waste of time to have to puzzle out where the commands went and, "What are they now calling the function I need?" When major changes are made there should be a simple way to convert an old document to the new version, stripping out the old, non-secure aspects. They spend too much time making things look cool, with not enough thought into making the products more usable.

sweet_ey
sweet_ey

Just my thought, I think MS should consider bundling themes from their old versions (like 97, 2000, XP and 2003) so that a user can choose a user friendly theme to use. I like the classic theme that was first included in WinXP and Vista. Just my penny