After Hours

Photomicrography winning images over the years

Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) anther (20x)

Nikon's Small World has been displaying photography through the microscope since 1974, but its photomicrography competition dates back to 1977.

The 1st place winning photo in 2009 was taken by Heiti Paves - Tallinn University of Technology.

Courtesy of Nikon Small World

About

Sonja Thompson has worked for TechRepublic since October of 1999. She is currently a Senior Editor and the host of the Smartphones and Tablets blogs.

4 comments
pjb66
pjb66

Though these photos are awesome, its difficult for Joe Public to know exactly what there looking at due to the very scientific names. I centainly would apprecitae them more if I knew when some of them were.

seanferd
seanferd

or descriptions. Some do not have latin scientific names because they are not organisms (e.g., photo resist). First photo: Thale cress is a flower, the anther is the bit which sports pollen. The easy answer for words you don't understand is: Look them up. If you have trouble understanding a particular image explanation once you have looked at a definition or Wikipedia article or whatnot, just ask.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

Joe Public... it's Joe Plumber. You just need to put a ventriloquist palinite next to him and he'll be ok. I think pic 7 is of what's commonly called slime molds... when food gets scarce they clump together, becoming a multicellular mobile conglomerate. Freaky stuff. Best thing is that they're very common, you can probably find some in your bathroom... if you look closely enough. Or you can pretend you overheard that :p

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

some would say that the blogger looking the stuff up makes a difference in quality. Though, for some of the stuff, the common name wouldn't illuminate most readers either.