Hardware

Photos: 10 robots you'll find in unexpected places

RoboBees

Bees are dying at an unprecedented rate through the mysterious colony collapse disorder (CCD), usually attributed to pesticides, disease, and parasites. Harvard University came up with RoboBees to help solve the problem. The tiny, bee-size robots, which weigh less than a tenth of a gram, can lift off the ground and hover if they are tethered to a power supply. The researchers are working to get the robots to "talk" to one another as honeybees do and to transmit pollen. They think it could be functional within 10 to 15 years.

Image: Harvard University

About

Lyndsey Gilpin is a Staff Writer for TechRepublic. She covers sustainability, tech leadership, 3D printing, and social entrepreneurship. She's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks.

6 comments
Refurbished
Refurbished

What I don't understand is why anyone would create a hitchhiking robot.

scott.smith1
scott.smith1

RoboBees - oh dear! Couldn't we spend that time/money/effort on saving the real bees?

thebaldguy
thebaldguy

The Korean baseball fan robots remind me of the real ones I see at Dodger Stadium. Do they also vanish by the seventh inning?

k.r.johnson
k.r.johnson

Don't forget the widest application of robots. Traffic lights have replaced police officers as a means of controlling traffic. (The normal South African English word for "traffic light" is "robot.") They are better at co-ordinating traffic flows across intersections, and they have freed police officers to undertake duties more closely connected with preventing and solving crime..