PCs

Photos: The polycarbonate all-in-one LCD PC

29 comments
pcbman
pcbman

SWEET!!!!!!!!!!!

TheGooch1
TheGooch1

The monitor/camera/keyboard/mouse are the same as what I use at home. However, I would think with all that weight behind the LCD that would make it hard to move and often the LCD would tilt up too far..all on its own. It would be ok for a very dumb terminal, but not for something that is actually used as a computer ( filming, burning DVD's, etc. )

The Listed 'G MAN'
The Listed 'G MAN'

play the doovde? Is it ready for the hood or is it just a standard lickadutoove?

george.flecknell
george.flecknell

I love it! Goes to show how brilliant a design you can make easily yourself without paying someone else a crushing amount for it. Sony and Apple - your day's are numbered in the odd pc shape limelight.

padillald
padillald

Hello George, congratulations on your work, it's an outstandng piece of architecture. Do you think it can be done as well with lightweight translucent PCB? and also, do you know which manufacturers sell internal slot-loading slim DVD+/-RW drives with an Serial-ATA interface?

kevin_pearson
kevin_pearson

It looks cool, but were is the DVD drive for loading software. is it external?

loss4words
loss4words

Wonderful project! I love it. The only thing I would've done differently would be to internally mount wifi so as to avoid the network cable, and hook the keyboard and mouse receiver up to USB internally so you didn't need to leave anything hanging out the bottom, albeit neatly. But then again, I've never done this so I guess I can't really criticise too much can I? Very well done.

cbryan
cbryan

What, do you think its an apple or something. its freaking ugly and stupid. Dorks!

BaapidMakwa
BaapidMakwa

"George Ou built his latest space-saving PC out of 3/16th-inch jet-black polycarbonate, which makes the chassis look like the material from a grand piano." Uh, you mean, like laquered wood?

rbeard
rbeard

Forget about any FCC certification on a design like this. Metal cases are made that way to shield other devices from the RF noise generated by the computer.

rbkircher
rbkircher

Kind of a side note, but in the 60's I used to build amateur radio receivers and transmitters using 1/4" chicken wire for a chassis -- very economical and didn't require hole punches or anything -- looked weird but it worked for a low budget guy like me ;)

JubaJones
JubaJones

What a great job! I would just change/add a few things: 1- I would try to use an external power supply because the case tiny internal space - it'll keep the heat away from the CPU, memory, etc. 2- Why you made the case so tall? You could trim a little bit more - you can even trim it much more if the power supply goes out of the case. 3- I would round (sand and polish) the case corners to give it a more professional looking. 4- I noticed a button at the case's top... is it the reset button? if so, it's kinda dangerous, isn't it? I'd place it in the back or under the case. Keep on goin'!

DRVTACH
DRVTACH

Nice , I would change 1 thing. Use a 10ft Rack Server 3-Way Y Power Cord. That gives you 1 cord to plug in, power the monitor and computer with 2 of the female connectors and have the 3rd 110v on the desk top or in the base to power anything you might need to . I bought 3 @ $4.95 each on e-bay Have a Good One BILL MacGregor

whitfld64
whitfld64

I think it's a great idea. One thing that has always bugged me about having computers in the house was the ugly cables and wires. thanks for sharing your creations with us!

Systems Guy
Systems Guy

Great job George! However, a caveat. I have read that you should avoid breathing the dust from the polycarbonate material. Apparently the dust particles and thus the crystaline structure of the dust has sharp edges, like broken glass. Although the dust particles may not cut your fingers, breathing it and getting it in your eyes is to be avoided. So wear saftey gear.

Larry the Security Guy
Larry the Security Guy

George, you really ought to pick up your laundry and otherwise unclutter your background before taking pictures. :) Seriously, great job. Having built several of my own PCs more for the experience than for the savings, and having built Ham radios before that, I am always happy to see other DIY projects come to fruition.

Gary_Russell
Gary_Russell

Very neatly done!!! Thou hast inspired me to build one, not buy one!

JHD3
JHD3

Why not just buy an iMac G5 ???

cescobar
cescobar

Do you have a Worklog on how you built it? I had the same idea :P but I was planning on make it more "Portable" like a "Notedesk" xD. By the way, how strong is polycarbonate? Is it strong enough to make possible to transport it without risks?

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Obviously the concept is valid, since Apple, Gateway and Dell all have vaguely similar models. However, while the construction is excellent for a home-built chassis, it is obviously very industrial-looking. True, it's invisible to the operator, which is what George desired, from any other angle it just looks like a fat, black box on the back of the monitor. It would have taken more effort, but if it had been rigged with a more rounded case that also closed the gap between the display and the computer then it would appear much more elegant from all angles. Despite the fact that I personally use an aluminum iMac, I do like the concept of being able to get into the case to upgrade/replace components when necessary. It's an elegant concept with a utilitarian execution in this case. I say Good work, George. Now clean it up and make it marketable.

hesseljh
hesseljh

i really like your design and the finnished Product. if you make another, You may consider a case material sold by GE Plastics. It has a solid core of PVC and both sides are have a .006" sheet of Aluminum. It is very light and very rigid and can ve worked with everyday hand or power tools. It bens to a pretty tight radius also. The total thicknes is about 1/8" to 3/16". Comes in a limited selection of colors. Jim 1/30/08

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

I think the whole point was to DIY and avoid vendor's overpriced solutions like the iMac and the XPS One. Maybe he's a Linux guy or a Windows guy and has no use for an iMac? iMac's start at $1200, XPS One at about the same and he has less than half that in his setup which does exactly what he needs without the extra stuff.

rjordanski
rjordanski

Not with your dirty laundry on the floor, but with the machine. I've only ventured to build one computer and it turned out great, in fact, I used it exclusively from like 2001 thru the end of 2003 when I bought my first Dell. GREAT WORK mate. Very creative!

Jason Bourne
Jason Bourne

In response to one question: Polycarbonate is considered impact resistant and is quite durable. It is used in tail light lenses and eyeglasses. Also, 'Bullet Proof Glass' is actually made (mostly, not exclusively) of layered polycarbonate. The edges of polycarbonate can be cleaned up to some extent by "flaming" them. Using a propane torch, 'gently' flame the edges to make them appear smooth and shiny. This won't remove deep grooves. One more thought... remember older power supplies that had an additional power port which, with the right cord, you could plug your monitor into? That would give you just one power cord!

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

Seems to me the whole point of the exercise was to do it on a budget and still end up with a (relatively speaking) slim solution, which he accomplished. Sure, you can buy an iMac g5 or a Dell XPS One, but you're looking at alot of money...enough money to buy a far more powerful desktop. He instead built a slim line pc utilizing stuff he more than likely had lying around. It was an exercise in creativity, not an exercise of the wallet.

coyt.watters
coyt.watters

Over on Hackaday, the recent discussion was you would reasonably run the LCD monitor from the PC's power. Most LCD with the external power brick are pulling power within the spare capacity of MOST PC power supplies.

tyltotheler92
tyltotheler92

That is cool. Got a couple suggestions though. The first would get the LCD screen to use the ATX PSU for power. Secondly, just run the webcam's wire down the side, and hide it well. Cool idea though, considering that an all-in-one Pc costs atleast a 1000 dollars!