Software

Save images in Microsoft Word documents as separate files

Save as Web Page

Using the Insert menu, manually adding pictures to a Microsoft Office Word document is a simple process. Saving pictures already embedded in a Word document as separate image files can be a bit more difficult--unless you know these simple tricks.



Imagine the following scenario. Some sent you a Word document loaded with pictures (30 or more). You need the pictures as individual image files, but for some reason the document's creator can't send you the images.



Now, you could open the document in Word, select a single image, copy it, paste the image into your favorite image-editing application, and then save the picture. But, this would take too long. You could also create a script or macro to remove copy the images, but again, this is more work than necessary. By saving the file as a Web page (Word 2000, Word 2002/XP, or Word 2003) or by unzipping the .docx file (Word 2007), you can quickly save embedded images as individual files.



Save as Web page

Using the following steps for Word 2000, Word 2002/XP, or Word 2003:

  1. Open the document in Word.
  2. Click File from the Standard Toolbar.
  3. Click Save As.
  4. Specify your Save in location.
  5. Select Web Page (*.htm; *.html) from the Save as type drop-down menu.
  6. Click Save.
Make sure you choose Web Page (*.htm; *.html) and not Single File Web Page (*.mht; *.mhtml). When you save the document as a Web page, Word creates an .htm file and folder containing the embedded images.

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

10 comments
norseconst
norseconst

Another MS irritant in the recyle bin - YES!

wpong3
wpong3

I struggled with this some time back as well. Found that even saving using the method above can result in "unexplained" loss of image quality. Stumbled on the article pasted below. Since I can't save the screenshots that came with the article, here's the bottom line: To save pictures from w/in a Word2003 doc: Go through the process indicated in the post above, *but also*, on the "Save As" dialogue, find the "Tools" drop down (obscure: upper right of the Save-as dialogue) "Tools" >> "Compress pictures" >> Then, on the window that appears, try these settings: "Change resolution" [no change] "Options" [uncheck compress pictures] --Will ---------------------------- TheDesignspace Exporting high resolution Graphics from Microsoft Word 2003 March 11, 2008 Applications | Microsoft Word | Windows In Word 2003, it is not immediately obvious how to export pictures that have been inserted into a Word document. Even if you select "File: Save As..." and select the format "Web Page" in the "Save As" dialog, the images that get saved along with the web page are usually low resolution. The solution to this is a menu selection "Compress Pictures" which is hidden in the "Tools" menu in the "Save As" dialog. ----------------------------

brad
brad

Either open the document in word 2007 and save it as a new file (test.docx), or copy and pste it to a new file. browse to the file with explorer/mycomputer, and rename the file (f2 or right click) to test.zip. Ignor the warning message. click to open the zip file click to open the 'word' folder click to open the 'media' folder within the zip there are all of your images as png files, with the maximum resolution. you can copy and paste them to a new folder to access them, or just click on each one. I didn't know you could do this until the author of this article mentioned it in passing. Brad Jensen www.laservault.com

jmanzella
jmanzella

You need to keep in mind the intention of Save As Web Page. It will provide you with an image intended for viewing by browser. So if you have JPGs in the doc you are OK but if you have TIFFs in your doc you will get PNGs and they will be compressed.

bblinn
bblinn

Trouble is, those files are low-quality JPGs that are largely unusable. It's better to keep the original files. If they're not available, expand the embedded image to 100% and use SnagIt or a similar application. Slower, true, but the quality is far better.

bogburn48
bogburn48

You think that's slick? That's not even the half of it. The extraction is LOSSLESS! Hence, hidden embedded files (inserted using a steganography program like, say, Invisible Secrets) can be recovered completely intact! Bit for bit. SWEET! Man, it don't git much better than that. .

lmroces
lmroces

Thanks for this tip. I used to copy the image, paste it into Publisher, then right-click, "save" the image from Publisher, often wondering why MS didn't give Word this same functionality.

brad
brad

Jpg is an approximation of the image, but png is the actual data with lossless compression. Converting tiff to png doesn't create any loss in picture quality at all. While an uncompressed tiff may seem like the Holy Grail to some users, they don't gain anything over a Tiff compresson format that is lossless. I've done graphics programming at the pixel level, I'm not making this up.