Security

Screenshots: Five overlooked enterprise grade antivirus systems

9 comments
sh10453
sh10453

The Subject of this Newsletter said Five alternatives to Microsoft Office. How did it change to AV? Anyway, for home I'm happy with the combination of Avast, Comodo, Malware Bytes , Microsft Security Essentials, Super Antispyware, SpywareBlaster, Ad-Aware (which is a bit too sensitive), and ClamWin Portable. Malware Bytes, Super Antispyware, and SpywareBlaster are run manually. SpywareBlaster is a great prevention tool that locks out bad sites (through the HOSTS file). I update it manually once every week or so. Nearly 16 thousand bad sites are blocked, as of now. I used to love Spybot S&D, but it has become huge (installed is in excess of 125 MB), so I do not use it anymore. I also carry ClamWin portable on a thumb drive (with database updated of course). I think most of them, if not all of them, do a very good job, generally, and it becomes a matter of personal choice and familiarity with the product. In the past I used McAfee, Panda, AVG, and Norton. I hated Norton, and I was not thrilled with McAfee; many times it missed, and then caused a lot of destruction! I have no faith in McAfe anymore. Once bitten, twice shy. Aside from that, my FireFox has quite a number of blocking add-ons, such as "NoScript". Now we want the original subject covered in the next article, namely Five Free Alternatives to Microsoft Office

kylehutson
kylehutson

Just two weeks ago I underwent a similar evaluation for a client (but missed VIPRE in my evaluations, dangit). The one we came up with was K7 (k7computing.com). They just bought Vexira, which was huge in the K-12 space (read: small footprint because it runs on ancient systems). I was rather pleased with what they offered, and at an aggressive price. No relation to the company, just a happy customer.

bobw
bobw

AVIRA, ESET Smart Security 5, McAfee, Bitdefender, F-Secure.

krencey
krencey

Can I ask how ESET Endpoint Antivirus would stack up? And maybe why it was not considered? Thanks!

bill
bill

F-Prot. I have been using their home product on my network for years, I am going to assume that their enterprise solutions are just as excellent and affordable.

greggwon
greggwon

Microsoft has started to step up to the plate on security in their lousy OS. The Security Essentials seems to take care of the problem without the "constant" blocking and slowing to a crawl that so many other antivirus software suites "provide". I and everyone I know have given up on anything except Security Essentials so that Microsoft can gather data about viruses, and more importantly instantly "turn off" access to things via the technology which they apparently have included to allow users to collaborate on risk assessment via the data collected. If you want to pay more people with more of your money for something that you can already get for free, what's the point? So how are these things more valuable than Microsoft Security Essentials?

peter.brouwer
peter.brouwer

Seeing the topic is enterprise type antivirus protection, would it be an idea to create a follow up article of virus products supporting icap? I.e. clients connecting a scan server for scan requests of objects ( documents, zip files, etc etc) from the client.

Computer Dave
Computer Dave

greggwon: I'm guessing you don't understand the difference between an AV like MSE and an enterprise solution. MSE is a great start - for the desktop. But it has no central management and cannot be run on MS Server platforms. I use MSE on my desktops (about 75) but I also install Malwarebytes, Spybot S&D, and Super Anti-Spyware. MSE simply does not catch everything. On my servers (about a dozen) I use Vipre. It's has a low price, a small footprint, and is very fast in terms of scanning. I also have incremental snapshot backups every 15 minutes. No one solution is perfect and while MSE's price is right, it still needs help from at least one other app.