Windows 8

Shutdown Windows 8 from context menu

I added a cascading Shut Down menu to the Desktop context menu

This screenshot gallery is also available as a post in the TechRepublic Windows and Office Blog.

In the article Add a Shutdown menu to the Windows 8 desktop, I showed you how to add a Shutdown menu to the taskbar. While that technique works fine, I have never really been satisfied with it because the menu takes up so much space on the taskbar for something that I use so infrequently. Well, I was recently poking around on the Microsoft MSDN site and found a lot of information about working with context menus by editing the registry. Along the way, I learned how to add cascading menus to a context menu, such as the one you encounter when you right click on the desktop. That got me thinking about the possibility of adding the Shut Down menu to the Desktop context menu.

After a bit of experimentation, I was able to figure out how to make it work in Windows 8 and developed the Shut Down menu shown in Figure A.

As you can see, I went full bore and added every possible option to my Shut Down menu. I then grouped the options into functional categories, added separators to delineate the categories, and even included appropriate icons.

After I was finished with my creation I showed it to several colleagues. While the overall consensus was that it was a great technique, a couple folks mentioned that they wouldn't have used all of the options, and one guy said that he thought that the icons were overkill. All valuable input.

Credit: Images by Greg Shultz for TechRepublic

About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

11 comments
jrosnow
jrosnow

 When searching for the CommandStore, make sure you have the right path.  The first search I did defaulted to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\15.0\ClickToRun\REGISTRY\MACHINE\Software|Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\CommandStore.

lee_h_shannon
lee_h_shannon

The face that this article exists says it all about the Windows 8 interface.

pradipsagdeo
pradipsagdeo

I have Win7 on my desktop and Win 8 on the laptop. It took me a few seconds to figure out that Win+D brings up the familiar desktop and how to shut down Win 8 by moving the pointer to the lower right corner and bring up the menu that has the shut down button. It has been a reflex action for me now, like driving and occasionally changing the radio station at the same time. Are we so inept these days that a relatively minor change throws us off badly? Thanks. Pradip

Steve__Jobs
Steve__Jobs

*cough* where is the link to the REG file?

sangraal
sangraal

In business nowadays there seems no accountability considered of mindless decisions that bring out poor results and these decisions are even affecting everyone in business and at home! I do not blame Microsoft for their stupid operating system interface. Bu8t, the new decisions makers that I know are there and are in high positions. They fired a fall guy that utilized their own orders efficiently and soon they will have nowhere to turn. It is a shame that innovation is a thing of the past because useless business executives maintain thoughtless control over engineering aspects instead of the individuals trained to do so. It may be a plan to bring the giant down for all we know... btw the start menu is not the only re engineering I've had to do with my installs and it is quite frustrating

arcov
arcov

This is probably better then the start menu, the only thing needed is a free area on the desktop

codemonkey1
codemonkey1

Nice but. Installing stardock star8 is mobetta

MarkWAliasQ
MarkWAliasQ

Not sure how that pans out on a touch screen.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I read a lot of posts asking why people aren't using the same shortcuts in W8 that they did in previous versions. It isn't that people have forgotten them. It's that, unlike we geeks and professionals, the average user never knew them. Mice hit their desks back in the late '80s and early '90s and that's how they learned to interact with Windows. They thought it was easier to look for a visual cue than to memorize keystrokes. I agree with them.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin moderator

The link is in image 13 - maybe easier to find in the blog version.