Disaster Recovery

Simply Safe Backup: The Right Tool for the Job?

Simple Safe Backup - Backup Files Wizard

As mentioned before, users can add an extra step of security by requiring a password to open a backup archive. Using the password feature requires that users check the Use A Password To Protect My Files box and enter and confirm the password.

About

Erik Eckel owns and operates two technology companies. As a managing partner with Louisville Geek, he works daily as an IT consultant to assist small businesses in overcoming technology challenges and maximizing IT investments. He is also president o...

10 comments
MagicStarER
MagicStarER

now we know exactly what it looks with the preponderance of slides, where the hell can we get it??????

d.kohnhorst
d.kohnhorst

I have used this for a couple of years. It is a good tool BUT the support for the paid for version is lousy (don't expect support on the free version). I believe that this product is not being developed further. Use with caution

bsmith7412
bsmith7412

Nothing wrong with the slides, Lets you know what your getting . Great tool to have. Scott

Jack-M
Jack-M

Way too many slides

KevLev
KevLev

I totally agree. What I'll usually do if the article is worthwhile, especially when it's 3 or 4 pages, I'll cut/paste all the info into an email so I have it in a "Tech Folder". But when I saw the amount of slides this one had, I cancled that idea really quick.

MGP2
MGP2

I don't think ANY TechRepublic member needs to see slides showing which button to click (run or cancel), or the EULA, or the installation folder. After about the 7th useless slide, I gave up. Please be a little more brief when posting slideshows.

golncor
golncor

There were definitely a lot of slides in this presentation. Is there really a need to show a typical installation? I appreciate the effort taken with all the different screen shots of the actual application and say keep it up but leave out the installation slides.

mediamaniac
mediamaniac

I would disagree with your assessment that TR members don't need to see slides showing which button to click and many will use this presentation as user documentation as much as a marketing tool. Good tech writing absorbs and spits out verbatim every piece of the puzzle no matter how redundant or superfluous. Further, this site isn't only for the advanced tech. Being an advanced tech myself I can say with absolute certainty that even some intermediate techs do better with an image in front of them. For those of us who are more advanced and knowledgeable, we can always skip images. Novices and tech challenged need all the help they can get. I say the more slides the better. All of this being said, I fail to see this as anything more than user documentation and it should be presented as such. I learned little beyond how to install it.

TechnicalMumboJumbo
TechnicalMumboJumbo

From reading some of the responses to your post it looks like at least a few of these ham & eggers actually need all of the pictures to explain a program install for them. As if they never installed a piece of software before. I end up creating step by step screenshot demos & videos for my end users from time to time, to explain how to do something, or how to use a new piece of software, but those are for users; we all know they're not too bright. In my opinion, anyone working in the IT field who needs screen shots like the ones given in this article should really consider a new line of work. Perhaps they might be better suited for a career in burger flipping, or maybe in the french fry managing field. Just a thought.

Larry the Security Guy
Larry the Security Guy

Constructive criticism: I learned a long time ago that presentations containing more than five or six slides is a sure-fire way of losing one's audience. Genesis can be told in less than a dozen. You used forty four to tell a three- or four-slide story. Don't tease a story that isn't told. The NetNote mailing said this would tell me why it "is the right tool for the job", "can help" and "will meet many Windows users' needs". But I didn't see that at all.