Windows

Slideshow: How to add Flip3D to the Taskbar

Create a shortcut on the Windows Desktop

Windows Vista had a graphical feature for switching between open applications called Flip3D, which was located on the Taskbar. However, for some reason that feature is absent from the Windows 7 Taskbar. If you like to get it back, all you have to do is create a desktop shortcut with a specific command and pin it to the Taskbar.

Note: Flip3D is still part of the Windows 7 interface via a keyboard shortcut: [Windows key] + [Tab]. But by pinning a shortcut to the Taskbar, you will be able to get the feature with the mouse, which can come in handy if you aren't in a good position to get two hands on the keyboard.

Create the shortcut

To start, right-click on an empty part of the Windows Desktop, navigate to New | Shortcut as shown.

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

16 comments
Dave Toombs CE
Dave Toombs CE

Works really well, futuristic even! I never used it in Vista but my win764 likes it.

simpleonoff
simpleonoff

I like changing things up a bit and finding a "differ-ent" icon for my apps. anyway, now the Winkey+tab key is available as a more keen usage, if you want to re-source it out.

nallohm
nallohm

Did all the steps and nothing. Am I doing something wrong?

amps_dad
amps_dad

Unfortunately it doesn't seem to work for me. Did I miss type some thing? C:\Windows\System32\rundll32.exe DwmApi #105 I've tried it with and without a space between api and # but nothing happens.

deanpoi
deanpoi

Try using "Winkey+Tab"... why go through all this trouble to add shortcuts when it's already been made as simple as it gets.

dgwinter
dgwinter

it doesn't work here. The up/down arrow keys will scroll though.

wcruhe
wcruhe

e-mail = wcruhe@comcast.net

j-mccurdy
j-mccurdy

Try to copy and paste the commands.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin moderator

It should work for everyone as far as I know - is the Aero GIU on for your system?

j-mccurdy
j-mccurdy

I have done it on probably more than 15 different systems, and it works every time. Try and copy and paste the commands. I always do that from a site called "Into Windows. If it does not work from here, Google "Into Windows get back flip 3D "

j-mccurdy
j-mccurdy

Using the keys sucks. It takes two hands and you have to hold them. Clicking the icon is much better, then you just push the down arrow or spin mouse wheel. I do the arrow on my laptop and wheel on desktop. The whole procedure takes less than 5 minutes. And you only have to do it once per windows install.

mfmiller5
mfmiller5

Look at his last photo. It shows flip 3D. You can flip through your open windows in 3D.

j-mccurdy
j-mccurdy

I have been doing this since Windows 7 beta. Flip 3D is really cool. Sometimes I get so many things open that I have trouble finding something. It's not really a necessary tool but it's not eating anything just sitting there in my task bar. I learned how to do this from a site called " Into Windows" They have a lot of neat stuff on there. I think clicking the icon in the task bar is easier than doing the keyboard shortcut. I also keep a shortcut down there for task manager. Heh Task manager in the taskbar, I hadn't thought of that.

tiredoftechrepublic
tiredoftechrepublic

(To access the 'Flip 3D' feature takes one's thumb & a finger of your choice, with only one hand... that said... ;) One great thing about Windows is the wonderful concept that there are many different ways to achieve the same result. Some like to mouse, some like to type, some like to mix it up... I use my left hand on the keyboard & mouse with the right, so Win+Tab would be what I would use, more than the shortcut. Personally, I use Alt+Tab, because with the Aero interface, it is easier and faster for my style. Also, I find, that grouping on the taskbar with thumbnail previews, to be a nice feature for my eyes, and if you have the animation on, it's pretty slick. Customizing Windows for different users & work modes has always made my job a rewarding one, and it's the little things that make a lot of difference. I will add this one to my bag of tricks and offer it to my users. Thanks, Mark!