Tablets

Tablet timeline: A retrospective

28 comments
noqlk3v02
noqlk3v02

You included the "tablet" displays from 2001 A Space Odyssey, even though they were nothing more than background and played no role in the story, yet you left out the "datapads" from Star Trek The Next Generation! They were the first thing I thought of when I first saw the iPad demonstrated.

saladbar821
saladbar821

You can't forget about Motion Computing tablet products. They're heavily used in the medical fields and work very well in my opinion. Perhaps I'm slightly biased since a member of my family does make the ReadyDock which charges and has an option of disinfecting the tables in medical areas. Cool stuff actually: http://www.readydock.net/

benparkes1981
benparkes1981

I'm specifcally thinking of the first convertible tablets like the TMC100 from Acer that make some of today's 'invetions' look a but out of date. Guess they were just ahead of their time!

tharadmin
tharadmin

Newton had some interesting products, I bought their best one a few years ago when I found one at a good price and had a lot of fun.

camcost
camcost

Definitely the most widely accepted tablet ever! If including a couple which are on the list then it only makes sense to add the first tablet which most of us started out with... and it didn't even require a pen!

tenebrulus
tenebrulus

I read the article from my TC 1100 and wrote this response. I have Win 7 and it multitasks better than most new Androids or iPads. A good design from 2005 that still holds its own. In fact I think this more closely mirrors the "Newspad" that Arthur C. Clarke envisioned than the iPad...

davids
davids

The Compaq TC1000 was really revolutionary. My wife and I have been using it as our primany computer (in bed) for 5 years. Full version of windows 7 runs well on it. Both IBM and HP made quite a few of these "laptop" "convertable tablets" all of which are exceptional.

Kanderous
Kanderous

Just to amend your HP500. Yes, the HP500 is inadequate, and it really is. It does not use a Wacom Digitizer for one, uses an Atom processor and is really inadequate for drawing due to the poor choice of penabling it uses and the fact the Atom is a weak pile of moss. http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&DEPA=0&Order=BESTMATCH&Description=EEE+slate&x=0&y=0 EP121. Tablet PC done right. Core i5 470UM and a Wacom Digitizer. It's been in and out of stock for the past few weeks, and I'm sure it's becoming quite a sleeper hit even if it doesnt break news.

Sensor Guy
Sensor Guy

You missed the world of CAD and CATIA, which really created the initial profitable business uses and technological base for today's tablets. The time line you should show is the progression of the tablet from an auxiliary and specialty I/O technology secondary to the main line QWERTY keyboard into a compute assisted primary standalone device which has absorbed the keyboard and mouse into its display function.

bmclachlan
bmclachlan

The Concerto was also my favorite and certainly was one of the first full feature operating systems in a easy-to-use format with good battery life. It was my desktop and laptop until it was stolen! This article certainly was not complete at all having missed many great table milestones.

richardsneal
richardsneal

We all remember the ones from our past, some fondly, some not so much. My favorite was the Compaq Concerto (~1992).

camcost
camcost

As others have already stated, this piece has far too many holes and omissions. It would be great to bookmark a thoroughly researched article on the subject to use as reference. This piece would hardly garner more than a C- if it were graded in a classroom.

cwe20
cwe20

You are missing the business class 2730p tablets and the excellent Touchsmart TM2. Yes, they have a full windows OS and yes we do want a windows OS on a tablet. Just because Apple Marketeers want you to think otherwise you might try speaking to informed users that use them to their full potential. iPads are feature challenged gimmicks.

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

We were going along just fine, and all of the sudden, it was over. I mean really! It all started back in 1886 with the Teleautograph - which by the way does not remotely resemble a tablet PC, more like the predecessor of the fax machine - so I figured we'd have a nice long run of photos and stories. Like getting one bite of a quesarrito combo and then having the whole platter yanked away. Then I had a bad feeling when pics 3 & 4 were images of a concept, not an actual device, and then #5 was a ficticious device from a movie. Why stop there? The gallery could have doubled in size if you'd gone ahead and included all the movie and TV ficticious machines. What about the Jetsons? Star Trek? The Flintstones (they used tablets, too, you know)? Then there's the real devices that were omitted - many of which have been mentioned, but many more remain. For example, McDonalds was using many years ago a tablet computer to go outside and take orders face-to-face in the drive-thru, so the customers didn't have to talk to an impersonal speaker. I figure the "researcher" either did like someone else has suggested, and used the ever-reliable Wikipedia, or maybe they just went from memory, and posted pictures of the ones they could think of, without doing any research at all. Pretty shoddy work to put up under the name of TechRepublic. Kind of like making a "timeline" of American history and leaving out half the presidents, but including Churchill and Louis XIV. Oh, and some ficticious ones, like President James Marshall from "Air Force One".

ricardo.bernardo
ricardo.bernardo

Compaq also came out with to my opinion a very successful tablet computer, called the Compaq TC1000 with XP Tablet addition. I used one myself for years and thought it to be very good.

dhernandez
dhernandez

you missed psion series 3, 3mx , 5 , 5mx ,...

mpayton
mpayton

Lots of flaws and omissions in this piece. It feels more like it was researched on wikipedia than that any kind of serious leg work was done. For example: Windows for Pen Computing is missing in action. The photo of the HP "Tablet PC" is actually a Pocket PC, a completely different device. The Slate 500 hasn't been met with yawns so much as the question, "Where is it?", since availability is incredibly constrained. Many Tablet manufacturers, both slate and convertible, are omitted and Compaq's well-ahead-of-it's-time hybrid, the TC1000/1100--still the best design for this type of device--is overlooked entirely!

ActiveAvatar
ActiveAvatar

Hard to miss out the one that actually brought a lot of the concepts into a practical and for its time, quite powerful tool

pjboyles
pjboyles

You left off the full size convertable and slate tablets from the likes of Fujitsu, Toshiba, Panasonic and Motion Computing. These had a huge market for the last 8 years. Yes most of these were in vertical markets but they had significant numbers within these markets.

ljthornsberry
ljthornsberry

Fujitsu Personal Systems division had many successful enterprise level tablet products way before Apple or any others got involved. You show one of the early ones but it is nothing compared to later products. They had 80% of the tablet PC market!

saladbar821
saladbar821

Yes, what about Wacom? I still remember my old graphire tablets and Wacom has further moved forward the industry (graphics and business).

TexasJetter
TexasJetter

I have a HP/Compaq tc4200 sitting on my desk with Windows 7 on it. It actually runs ok, and the handwritting recognition is pretty darn good. Just wish I could do something about the slow hard disk... My daughter has a tc4400 issued by her high school (Windows XP Tablet Edition). They have thousands of them at just her school. I think next year they are moving to the HP EliteBook series.

ricardo.bernardo
ricardo.bernardo

I concur, especially on the TC1000/1100, I have one and it had a excellent design

charlyjack
charlyjack

I still have mine and it still works. I just have not put it in its cradle in a long time and the battery is shot. I used it in my business for over 4 years as my personal computer and it was great. I think I paid over a thousand dollars for it and the dock.