Hardware

Take a closer look at the Microsoft Touch Mouse

Microsoft Touch Mouse 7

 

When you open the box, you see that the mouse is enclosed in what looks like a display case.

Image created by Greg Shultz for TechRepublic, all rights reserved.

About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

12 comments
michael.erskine.ctr
michael.erskine.ctr

Oh yeah lets tie our hardware to an OS so every time Microsoft changes the OS we not only have to buy the new OS but all new hardware too...Sheesh!

werjnb
werjnb

Does your boss know you have nothing to do . . ?

Greg Shultz
Greg Shultz

...I know not all galleries contain detailed article or reviews, but the first sentence under the first slide contains a reference and a link to the review: I recently received the Microsoft Touch Mouse and wrote a review of it for the Windows Desktop Report.

FirstHal
FirstHal

Definitely with jeffholden on this. It's a naff way to present info and even the galleries are not really user-friendly for ease of access. Odd, on a site with so many technically capable people! Like jeff I believe the only good part to this type of article is the back button.

jeffholden
jeffholden

Sorry, but I've given up. I wanted to know about the Touch mouse - what it does, how it worked, etc. BUT if I have to scroll through 26 pictures to be drip fed the information - forget it! If I could read the text and THEN look at more pictures, you would have a reader.

pctrain
pctrain

Would you say this Touch Mouse is healthier for one's wrists and arms than a normal mouse with buttons?

ksaldutti
ksaldutti

The though of a mouse with no clicking buttons and physical controls is a dream mouse. BUT it has to be seamless as far as working productively as like using mousse in the past. I would expect the control of touch to function with my OS and applications as they always have like when using AutoCAD or Excel etc. What is the take on this?

AtlantaTerry
AtlantaTerry

Bluetooth v2+EDR has a range of something like 30 feet. Plus it fits in with their Blue Laser theme. Terry Thomas... the photographer Atlanta, Georgia USA

brian
brian

Product galleries are only useful to readers in combination with some sort of other information, but TR seems to want to segregate them into their own area. This gallery should only have been released as part of an article about what it's like to use the mouse. As it is, it's completely vacuous. The only information I get that wouldn't come in higher quality by seeing it in person, unopened on the store shelf, is that it takes two AA batteries. They don't even bother with links to related articles about this product, only links to not-actually-related "related galleries," which I've come to assume are also presented in this awful format. TR, if you want to fix your galleries, present them as part of and inline with an actual informational article about the product. Present the images within the relevant text in the same successful format used by magazine articles, with the added bonus that on a webpage a compact thumbnail can access a larger version if the reader is interested. I'm truly tired of the galleries as they're done now. Time and time again clicking them and expecting information proves to be a mistake and a waste of my time.

brian
brian

I find articles like this really frustrating. Gratuitous quantity of photos of a product that just doesn't warrant that amount of visual attention from that many angles. For crying out loud they shot the plastic retail hanger with a macro lens and showcased the "Compatible with our current OS" logo. TR has really gone downhill.

brian
brian

It just also has touch, so probably not unless the new features save you from having to do a lot of repetitive motions. Proper mouse posture will make a far bigger difference in wrist stress than additional features on the device. Some people think that tablet-and-stylus type devices are less stressful than a mouse. Touch screens are another alternative. I personally can't get the same control with either, and find that I only have wrist issues when I've lapsed into a bad habit like using my wrist as an anchor on the table.

Greg Shultz
Greg Shultz

...the Touch Mouse is designed exclusively for Windows 7.