Start-Ups

Tech history in photos: Software giants of the 1990s

Linux author Linus Torvalds

The 1990s brought us Friends and Seinfeld, but it also brought some unique software innovations. Take a look at some of the trailblazers of the decade.

In this photo we see Linux author Linus Torvalds. Linux is an open source OS developed by Torvalds and released in 1991. As predicted by all of the hype in the 1990s, Linux has evolved into one of the most popular operating systems in the world. Today, it powers many of the servers that run the internet, is the underlying platform behind Android, and powers countless other devices.

Image: Linux Magazine

About

Conner Forrest is a Staff Writer for TechRepublic. He covers Google and startups and is passionate about the convergence of technology and culture.

8 comments
marccanter
marccanter

OK dude - first a few corrections and then a thank you.


1.  Our company was originally named MacroMind - it was started in 1984:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macromind


I was CEO, Mark Pierce did artwork and Jay (now Jamie) Fenton was the programmer.  We were soon joined by Erik Neumann, Dan Sadowski, John Henry Thompson and Al McNeil.


2.  We never competed with Adobe.  They made desktop publishing and video editing software, we did multimedia authoring,3D player game and a Comic Book tool.


3.  Flash came later - as did Dreamweaver.  the original core product was called Director - every Macintosh from 1986 shipped with a training disc created by Director.


4.  85% of the world's CD-ROMs were created with Director.  This is all - PRE - web.


Thank you very much for the coverage:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Canter


marc.blogs.it


marccanter4real

twteska
twteska

I'm finally going to comment. It must be me, but these lists never work in Firefox. What am I missing? Does everyone else here use IE?

dbutche0
dbutche0

How about a nod to CompuServe and AOL - both propelled Internet usage and were likely the foundation to today's social media...

butkus
butkus

How about GEOS.. graphic DOS interface...

I still have an interoffice envelope with two floppies.  One with Netscape 1.1 and the other, a modem program with a TCPIP stack program so it could call the college mainframe and get on the internet from a IBM PC (4 MHz) in an office that did not have any (10mb) connection yet.  In 1991 a 10mb 8 port hub cost some $1500.

Then you just needed the paper with all the IP addresses of web sites as DNS was not available yet.

You could call the college mainframe from home with that modem program (an 800 # back then) so I would show people the internet (for free) from my home.  After a year the dropped the 800 number as I would be on an hour or two every couple of days.  There were only BBS places to join and it better be a local call !  Question for the oldies out there.. why were the Page Up, Page Down keys so important ! !

orendon
orendon

What about Yahoo and Altavista founders?

jelabarre
jelabarre

@twteska  

Nope pretty much NOTHING on techrepublic works under Firefox.  As I don't use MSWindows,  I have to view it under Chrome.


Nirfolis
Nirfolis

@dbutche0 Both of them did a lot to populirise the internet and make it available to the masses, but they were both started in the 80's not the 90's. Geos (@butkus - below) was designed for the Commodore 64 so is even older.