Hardware

The 10 best choices for an e-reader

E-reader boxes

More people are looking to take advantage of e-readers, both for book reading and for long business documents. Here are the 10 best e-readers, along with comparison photos and a look at one of the popular new covers that can give an e-reader the feel of a traditional book.

You can also read this list in text format in the companion blog post.

Photo credit: Jason Hiner / TechRepublic

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

86 comments
rishi
rishi

Some how the author has missed out a GREAT contender from India - the OLIVEpad ( www.olive.net). I beleive it is more versatile and has lot more features than any one of the above. OLIVE is relatively more affordable.

jdev1
jdev1

Once again Jason Hiner your review is incomplete of world class ereader product Sony PRS-950 shame on you

fatdumbandhappy
fatdumbandhappy

Seems like a bit of bias toward the Kindle based on the number of photos. Why wasn't the enTourage eDGe included? It has two 10" screens - a stylus-markable reader and a tablet running Android.

Underground_In_TN
Underground_In_TN

Kindle, Nook and whatever Sony put out last year, that's all I've heard of. And I have no plans to purchase any of them or anything like them. Ever. I look at enough pixels all day long on my desktop and smartphone. Give me hard-bound paper, or give me an audiobook to listen to during my long commute.

leo821
leo821

Dear paperback e-readers, There are magazines, comic books and books with graphics/pictures too. Pay your electric bill, hiking, biking and swimming is great under the sun, not reading glaring pages. Sold my Sony e-reader and the Bookeen, love my iPad.

frampton
frampton

Let's see -- you mentioned some apps on the Apple devices, but here's the complete list for the iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch: 1. Kindle 2. Kobo 3. Apple iBooks 4. Nook 5. Stanza (a multiformat reader). 6. Audible (audiobooks). 7. Wattpad, which describes itself as "YouTube for books." 8. And many more multiformat readers...

Junkmale53
Junkmale53

Have it, love it. Borrow books all the time from the library and can also download when i want a new release.

lynxboomus
lynxboomus

This article is a cabbage. It mixes eBook readers with tablet notebooks (iPad) and cell phones and claim it compare the eBook readers. An eBook reader, I understand, is a dedicated device suited for reading books. I would never use a backlit screen like iPad to read books due to the proven strain to your eyes (I could use a netbook otherwise at the half price). Smartphones are even worst not only due to the back lit screen but also due to the size of their screen. Now about the real eBook readers: I would never buy a Kindle first due to their proprietary .AMZ format and the general feeling that you have to marry Amazon for the rest of your life if you chose their device. Not to mention the unserviceable battery (first thing that inevitably fails in any electronics) and the absence of external memory option. Nook uses the open ePub format has browsing capability, uses removable battery and accept microSD cards (is OK but still I would prefer a normal SD since is big enough not to lose it and is ready readable by my computer card reader without an sd adapter) . I would also prefer a mini USB connection like most of my other devices and not have to carry yet another cable for charging and data transfer. Both Kindle and?Nook lack a?very useful function: the ability to organize books and other econtent in hierarchical folders for easy management. My best pick is BeBook Neo from Endless Ideas (or its brand variants). It has touch screen interface with the ability to make annotations, hierarchical folder organization, WIFI access with basic web browsing, can read epub and many other formats natively (EPUB*, PDF*, TXT, HTML, RTF, MOBI, CHM, PDB, JPG, PNG, GIF, BMP, TIFF) none of the other readers match, ?SD card slot and mini USB connectivity. I still consider is a little overpriced at about ~$250 but I am expecting this to drop.

shari
shari

i love my Kindle. It was either buy an e-reader or rent a storage place for my books! I can't bear to part with my favorites, so was running out of room. As for who has the most books, I think it matters who has the type of books you want. I also have the Barnes and Noble reader and Kindle on my i-phone. Once you start reading on your phone, you forget it's just a phone if you're absorbed in your reading.

manperez
manperez

Guys, you forgot that most handhelds can run the free Mobipocket ebook reader program, allowing your faithful phone to also be your pocket library.... I've tested the program in Windows, BlackBerry, and Palm handhelds, as well as my laptops, and it works just fine. As far as I'm concerned, dedicated e-readers are not necessary.

jdev1
jdev1

Consider Sony Reader Daily Edition, Sony PRS-900 Daily Edition eBook Reader PRS-950BC WiFi

tinyang
tinyang

Maybe I'm an old timer here, but I've been reading ebooks for years and to this day I prefer using TomeRaider on my Palm Tungsten E2 pda as compared to all of these new fangled ebook devices, LOL.

GSG
GSG moderator

I love my Nook. When I bought it, Amazon's Kindle was way more expensive and did not support open formats such as PDF and regular text. At first, page turns were slow, and there were issues with it locking up when turning the wireless on and off, but those were fixed with patches to the OS. Patch installation is easy. You can either leave the wireless on and let it download and install, or do as I prefer, and download the install file, hook the Nook up with the USB cable, and drop the file at the root. It will take it from there. In the beginning, tech support was not that helpful to me, but, it was early days, and they worked hard to find the answers. A month or so ago, my case was cracked, adn I called to see if it was under warranty. All I had to say was that I had a hairline crack, and the support person immediately said to send it back. I had a new one within 2 days, without them asking if I dropped it or otherwise abused it. Yes, I'll always love holding that paper book, but for space savings, cost savings (it's already paid for itself), and the convenience, I'll stick with the Nook.

jsmith
jsmith

There is nothing wrong with the Kindle, although Nook users are very protective. I chose a Nook 6 months ago because it was slightly more adaptable than the Kindle, and had a B&N store close by. The Nook has been a constant companion. I never leave home without it. Yes, I also read on my iPod Touch, but not in bright sunlight. Otherwise I would have bought the Kindle. However, it is unfair to accuse the Nook being being "much more clunky". That is poor reviewing. If the fellow was paid to write this review, he didn't earn his keep.

codybwheeler
codybwheeler

How much digging did you have to do to find all of these "e-readers?" Errr... umm... The overwhelming message here seems to be, if it's not a Kindle, download the Kindle App, and don't take it outside.

kitbarr
kitbarr

I've had it a couple of years now and it's been awesome. Thinking of giving it to my hubby so I can get the newest one.

mjohnston
mjohnston

The iPad is nice and does a lot but it is not good for reading in the bright sunlight. The nook interface is not clunky it is extremely sleek and intuitive. Plus the nook uses the android OS. Get the nook.

PC Pete
PC Pete

Shari, my wife and I just moved into a small townhouse, and we didn't have room for most of my books either - hence I bought (and fell in love with) my Kindle DX. I had to throw out over 2,400 paperbacks. No-one would take 'em - not the hospital libraries (too many), no-one. :( OK, most were SF, but I nearly died throwing out my original Dune series, all my Piers Anthony, all my Asimovs (78 of those). Oh, the pain, the pain! Now, I'm actually glad - I've managed to find about 10% of my favourites that I had to chuck. And the Kindle's science and technical content seems to be improving daily. What's not to like?

WPee
WPee

I would love to catch someone fully absorbed in reading a HORROR novel on their phone...and then CALL them just to watch them JUMP OUT OF THEIR SKIN. :-)

jasonhiner
jasonhiner moderator

I didn't think I'd like it at all on that small screen but I quickly got absorbed and ended up reading a bunch of books on it just because it was always with me.

rjmiller78229
rjmiller78229

I started with the eBookman from franklin... barely fit in my shirtpocket. Even Kindle is now a little small for aged eyes but fits in my notebook side pocket so that is what I use. Hard to get used to looking for dark areas to read the eBookman... now looking for bright areas to read the Kindle. RJ

sailsmart
sailsmart

Given that we all appreciate the freedom of a compact portable reader with multiple interactive elements, why not add one more. If you're commuting and have to get off the train, wouldn't it be awesome to have the audible sync to where you left off jump into play right where you left off? Many people note that listening to a book is sometimes slower than reading it, and they enjoy the silence. However, the voice added to a good book, or audio elements enhance the atmosphere.

DDJohn
DDJohn

No one mentions the Wide World of PDAs or Ipods. Both are the ideal size for reading in bed, or while standing line everywhere.

wwwqueen
wwwqueen

That's what I've been using for the past 8 or so years - but I've recently retired and am thinking (not urgently) about something that is more simply ereader since I don't need all the palm planning tools so much any more. The Tungsten has served me very well, and I may just continue to use the thing until it dies.

d.j.elliott
d.j.elliott

I have a Nook, as well. I decided on the Nook because it handles a wider range of files than the Kindle and I liked the support of SD cards. I, too, use Calibre and its fantastic. All my ebooks/pdfs are located in one place on my hard drive, I have added metadata to each one, and its easy peasy to send files from Calibre to the Nook. As a senior citizen, reading hard/soft books was hard--hard to read fonts, hard to find a spot with good lighting and comfortable, hard to lug around, and hard to anticipate my reading mood. I've purchased a ScanSnap and am busily ripping up my books and turning them into PDFs. I know I am going to h*ll for ripping up books, but when they wheel me into a nursing home, my library will fit in my purse. ;-)

PatriciaT
PatriciaT

Just this week I started thinking about purchasing an e-reader for my daughter. I didn't know about many of these (Google? What's that??), so the timing of this article and responses is perfect! Thanks to all who have added their perspectives.

sailsmart
sailsmart

Oh yes, good idea, but only on a PC. Not available on a Mac yet.

jacobus57
jacobus57

Not much digging at all. When I was making the decision, I used Google, got hits on all the devices Jason mentioned, and a lot more info as well. Not to be snarky (well, maybe a little), but you do know about Google, right?

PC Pete
PC Pete

I've had my DX for just over 3 months, and I love it to bits. I've read over 100 books already on it, and I still have room for more. Now I've taken the plunge and subscribed to Time and PC Mag, so every week I have something new delivered! The DX is much better for voracious readers, with a clearer (higher-res AND better contrast ratio) display than ANY of the others. It works in doctor's waiting rooms, train stations, hospitals (I used to have to bring in a whole bag of books, but not any more!), even on the bog! And Whispernet works in rural Australia! What's not to love?

shadetre
shadetre

I am a fairly new user of a new Kindle DX and have found absolutely nothing to complain about. It works and it works well. I held off on the original Kindle even though I had seen one being used and was impressed by it. Looked at all of the new kids on the block too, as best as I could via the net. Made my choice and I think it was a well informed one for what I want.

MDExTexan
MDExTexan

I went with the Sony PRS-505 before I went to Europe last week. From what I read, the touch screen readers have more problems with glare, and since I often use the reader at night in bed with a headlamp to avoid disturbing my spouse excessive glare would be a problem. I bought the ereader to avoid lugging pounds and pounds of books with me on a week-long overseas trip, but I've found that I've used it at home when I finished a book in a series and wanted to read the next one right away without waiting for a trip to the library. Another reason I chose the Sony was to avoid being limited to purchasing books from Amazon. I've bought books from both Borders and Barnes and Nobel, since the Sony will read epub & pdf format books. Also Google books and the Gutenberg project have many free books. The Sony's metal case feels good in my hands, without being too heavy. You should buy the wall charger; if you travel without a P.C. you can't charge the device without it.

skooboy
skooboy

Judging from the poor grammar and spelling skills exhibited in blogs & posts like this and millions of others around the Internet, most people are in dire need of traditional paper books, from which you can read great tomes of historical, littoral, and critical thought. Stop being moronic consumers, who just fall for the "buy, buy, buy" culture of consumerism. Laptops suffice just fine for your computing needs. Don't damage the earth by purchasing more stupid manufactured crap that you don't need.

WPee
WPee

I am NOT going to haggle the choice of paper vs ebooks. I did not see anyone mention: HOW MY E-READER has changed HOW I READ. (Changed in a way no amount of paper books can match.) BEFORE Ebooks I most often STOP reading or SKIP-OVER any unfamilar/foreign words authors sometimes sneak in to their stories. Now as a passenger riding down the highway reading my NOOK I hit LOOK UP and without logging on or passwords or any special account crap I get a instant gradification by knowing weird words and their true meaning. Great for technical terms, medical terms, etc. I just thought you paperbook guys would like to know HOW I HAVE CHANGED. :-) :-)

n6xhh
n6xhh

I did a lot of comparison between the Nook and Kindle when the wife decided to buy a reader... They are both based on pretty much the same hardware (2GB internal flash, same screen, etc.) and they are both Andriod 2.1 based. The primary differences are the keyboards (physical on Kindle and virtual on the nook, and the application software (both Apps are available for PC and other devices. I used both, found nothing big to differentiate). The Primary reason I chose the Nook is that the kindle is NOT user servicable. Like just about any Apple product, it has to be sent back to the factory if the battery craps out, for example. The Nook, on the other hand, has a use replaceble battery and the big kicker... An external micro-SD slot to add external flash, up to 16GB. Considering the Nook also functions as a music player some may find this a plus. I personally like options. The Nook can also be optionally "Softrooted", at the expense of your warranty, to grant "root" access and allow other Apps to be loaded, such as Pandora radio working via WiFi.

sbrell
sbrell

Been thinking about it, just saw this and found in a first dive look. Thanks.

GeneS
GeneS

mjohnston is right! The Kindle is great at the beach

Adam in DC
Adam in DC

One thing in favor of the Nook and other non-kindle readers is the compatibility with Adobe Digital Editions ePubs. This means that I should be able to download ePubs from my local county library to my PC and then transfer them and read them on the Nook. They are good for 14 days. Just like a real book from the Library. Unfortunately, ADE cannot run on my HTC Evo, so I can't drag library ePubs to the Nook App on the Evo, I need a real Nook. The buzz seems to be towards a new Nook by the end of the year.

ttucker
ttucker

I totally agree with mjohnston... The Nook is NOT clunky and has a much larger inventory of books available to it than the Kindle. The Nook app is also available on multiple devices, just like the Kindle. I'm disappointed that the author seemed to imply the Kindle was a superior product to the Nook. That's simply not the case. My friends who are Kindle owners are envious of my Nook.

jacobus57
jacobus57

Anyone who actually reads the EULA would NEVER buy a Kindle. The device uploads all notations, highlighting, etc., which then become, effectively, the "property" of Amazon. Get a Nook, download Calibre, and read freely!

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

No good to the rest of the world I'm afraid.

kbruster2
kbruster2

Well I got my first ebook reader in 1998, a Rocket book, 8mg memory, 8 hours of charge. Weighed a ton and was the size of a paperback (1000 pages). The font was ajustable it did black and white graphics, sound and was backlit. Unfortunely they where ahead of their time and the company went belly up. Two years ago, it finally gasped its last breath, so I have been looking for a replacement, and am using a netbook until i make up my mind. With each new addition to the field its getting harder.

GSG
GSG moderator

They started printing those books in smaller font for some reason, so I enjoy changing font size in the Nook so I don't have to use my glasses. I recently went back and re-read a very large (over 1000 pages) book that I had in hardback, and realized what a struggle that was just to hold the thing. I do stick to an actual book for a couple of authors where I collect their books, just so I keep the collection going, and if I want to get an autograph, then I go for the physical book instead of having the author sign the back plate like some are doing. Since there are very few authors that I'd go to the effort of getting an autograph, that's not many physical books.

GSG
GSG moderator

I see that this is the only post you've made, and this is your intelligent reply? You know what? Kiss my @$$.

mvedwar
mvedwar

I'm IT full time and as much as I love technolgy, I think these are a waste. Nothing beats opening a real book and getting the full effect of sight, sound and smell of the paper. A great get away from our fast paced lives. Also I've never had the battery in a book go down, worried about sand/sunscreen on a book or had someone break into my car and steal a book. For what it's worth if I had to choose I'd get the Nook. But to each his/her own!

ccornute
ccornute

I bought one of these for my girlfriend for her birthday and she loves it...she just got the cover in the mail the other day that is much like the Kindle 3 cover only without the built-in light (which seems a bit redundant to me for an e-reader). At the price I got it for it was a steal...I had a 20% off coupon for Bed, Bath & Beyond (one of the retail stores carrying it) and they had a $20 dollar rebate on it as well...it wound up being only a little over $100 when all was said and done...

fatdumbandhappy
fatdumbandhappy

moron heal thyself littoral: of or pertaining to the shore of a lake, sea, or ocean literal: tending to construe words in the strict sense to your second point - buy or not what you choose, consumerism does generate a lot of waste (think happy meal toys) so it's easy to criticize in general. ereaders are allowing authors and publishers to stay in business if we consumers continue to buy, buy, buy new and old literature, though local book stores are falling by the wayside

santeewelding
santeewelding

You guys got to it long before I did. Classic. [b]skooboy[/b], buy property on the moon, then move and go live there. Change your name. Hide your face.

Photogenic Memory
Photogenic Memory

No trees were harmed in the publishing of such material. Your thought process are so last century.

jacobus57
jacobus57

Ah yes, those great LITTORAL tomes, all about amphibious landings and the seashore. Few things are more pathetic than someone trying to demonstrate that they are more intelligent than thou, while in the process inventing--or in this case grossly misusing words. Might consider getting yourself a decent dictionary, Skooboy. PS--I think the word you were groping for was "literary."

sailsmart
sailsmart

Do any of the readers have wifi access ports for a rocket stick? What if I'm out of wifi range?

NetSecTech
NetSecTech

You can download books for only 14 days? Here we can get them for 21 days. I've found that on my Aluratek Libre Pro, the "return" date doesn't matter. It will allow me access to the books, even after the due date until I resync with the PC. I also have the Sony 600 touch - which is nice, but I like the Aluratek better. I have more control over the contrast (Sony print is too light) and it can handle just as many formats as the Sony. I recently recieved a Kindle that I won and until I looked at it and played with it, I had no interest in the Kindle. But having found that I can get a number of Kindle books for free - an not just classics but recently published books, I've decided to keep my Kindle as well as the Aluratek. The Sony I gave to my son. That thing is heavy compared to the other two. I figure between the two of them, there won't be many e-book formats I won't be able to read.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner moderator

It is sluggish, disjointed at times, and not very intuitive. That said, it's a first generation product. It's a better first generation effort than the first-gen Kindle, but the user experience isn't quote as good as the Kindle yet, in my opinion. It will improve.

pauln
pauln

I too have a Nook and I've read about 10K+ pages. Reading on the Nook is delightfull. There's nothing clumsy about the Nook.

lverdinr
lverdinr

I visit the link and looks very attractive and more versatile than the expansive Apple Ipad. And I agree... Android makes a lot of noise to Apple with the gadgets based in it.

jarretf72
jarretf72

My wife has one, takes it everywhere. We both love using it. She doesn't even use/need a laptop anymore!

hunter
hunter

I have no idea how you can rate the Kindle App on the small iPhone screen ahead of the Kindle app on the Samsung Galaxy S or Evo. Both of these have much larger screens and in the case of the Galaxy S much much brighter and easier to read. Doesn't seem that too much research was done when writing this article.

reviep
reviep

Anyone who actually agrees with a EULA would EVER buy anything! EULAs are meaningless.

djt0711
djt0711

. . . that's as it should be then.

wwwqueen
wwwqueen

Not if you are an introvert and don;t know those people. Books!!!!!

PatriciaT
PatriciaT

One of the great things to do while riding public transportation or waiting in line is talking with people, connecting with other human beings, sharing a smile, good conversation and adding some incredibly positive energy into the universe. :-)

rjmiller78229
rjmiller78229

I am in IT also. I don't have any way to carry around the mountain of tech manuals I need or could potentially need in the course of my day's work. One thing that all eBooks seem to be missing is the "Safari Model" of book availability. I just bought a Kindle and wonder why it doesn't interface to "Safari". I don't need the books I just need to reference them. Guess Amazon isn't motivated by the Safari "book rental" model as their main business is to date sales. If they put their mind to it I bet they could really do something with this model. RJ

NetSecTech
NetSecTech

I love books to and am also a bit of a tech junkie. But I found I was being buried in books. I have well over 5000 books in my library - and those are just the one's I've inventoried. I decided to try to go digital as much as possible for books because it will cost a fortune to move what I have. I don't buy a book unless I know I'm going to read it multiple times - all of which I have (some as many as 30 or 40 times). Yeah, the eReaders take some getting used to, but if you go for one of the lighter models, such as the Aluratek, the print is very close to book print and you don't get wrist or hand fatigue from holding it. I still buy books, just not as many and only one's I can't get in electronic format. As for battery life, I don't know how long the Kindle will last - haven't had it long enough. The Aluratek lasts about two weeks, reading 2-4 hours a day or about 6000 page turns, the Sony 600 Touch last about the same.

mvedwar
mvedwar

Give them away when finished.

mvedwar
mvedwar

It just requires some planning ahead. I 'm never going to wait in line long enought to read in a book, paper or e-book. If going to a conference or something I just pre-select a couple and throw them in.

wwwqueen
wwwqueen

But, you can't take a selection of several hundred choices with you in your pocket (or purse) so you don't have to sit around with nothing to do while you are riding or waiting for someone else in line, etc.

PatriciaT
PatriciaT

I usually buy the real thing: paper, smell, dog-tagged pages. And, I get them for one or two bucks at my local thrift stores. As much as I'd love to have a Nook, and will probably buy one for my daughter as she moves through high school and college, there is still something wonderful about perusing titles in front of a shelf full of books. Then again, in my quest for clutter-free living, I may just break down and buy one, and donate the paper books and wooden bookcases. Isn't it interesting having one foot in the old way and one foot in the new way? ("A man's wealth is measured by the number of things he can live without." - Do I really need this??)

mbrown
mbrown

Agreed, I?ll take an actual book any day, but I really get tired of traveling with books that end up left wherever I finish them. I bought the new Kindle for travel and it is the best $139 I have ever spent. Easy on the eyes too, which surprised me, and after a month the initial charge is still going strong.

wwwqueen
wwwqueen

The publishers of these ebooks should be charging a LOT less for them. They are riding on the cost of paperback printing a distribution and making a killing - and, I can give away my entire hardcopy library if I want to. With all the rules they have made for electronic media. I can probably read it myself, but don't let anybody else even look at it on pain of prosecution. At those prices, Barnes & Noble should be giving away the reading devices at the very least.

cija
cija

...you are forgetting about all the electricity needed to power the rechargeable battery and one day you will need to dispose the lithium battery itself ...

Photogenic Memory
Photogenic Memory

Ebook readers are becoming popular marketed hardware like the Kindle, I-Pad, so on and so forth. I was referring to ebooks in general. They take up virtual space. Not actual space that displaces you or I. They leave minimal carbon foot-print of any kind unless you consider their storage on to a disk of plastic and layered metal. You can skip through sections of material with just a click depending on the format especially if it's in a PDF. 1's and 0's are harmless to the environment unless they're written into a tool to cause harm. eBOOK: electonically Bound Optimally Organized Knowledge It's that simple minus the hostility? Don;t you agree?

Stargzer
Stargzer

Don't give me this Green Garbage! You're probably one of those idiots who think incandescent bulbs should be banned and replaced with CFLs. Try using a CFL to keep your boat's bilge from freezing when it's docked in the water in winter. A 60-Watt Incandescent in a clamp light over the bilge pump keeps both the pump and the bilge from freezing. Books are the ultimate Green resource: long-lasting with proper care, still usable by unskilled people long after elctronics and storage media have become outdated; no toxic batteries to dispose of in landfills; no electricity needed from large power plants when reading by daylight or candlelight; can be recycled into new paper if the text offends you. They're also easier to flip back and forth between pages when referring to previous sections or looking up footnotes. This last is most handy when reviewing multi-volume procurement documentation or flipping between sections fo a repair manual in the field. Otherwise you'd need redundant eReaders to keep two places open for reference. On the other hand, eBooks are more compact and, in theory (like the Music CD), should be less expensive to produce once you have the reader. I'll be looking for one, but I want to make sure I can download simple text files if I need to. An eBook, like a hard-copy Book, is often a tool, and each tool sometimes has a specific purpose that another took cannot serve. BOOK: Bound Optimally Organized Knowledge

fatdumbandhappy
fatdumbandhappy

The eDGe has 802.11b/g wifi and Bluetooth www.entourageedge.com/devices/entourage-edge.html

ianni67
ianni67

about 3lbs is far too much for an e-book. I get tired after a few minutes while reading standing or at bed. An e-book reader must be lighter than, or as heavy as, a paper book.

tjsobieski
tjsobieski

I've been using Kindle for iPhone and it does get a bit tedious. But the $139 Kindle, much better. and I can read outside. I can also read free books that can be downloaded as .txt files, or .pdf

thinknirmal
thinknirmal

Are you living in a world where the sun never rises?

frampton
frampton

If we're getting all pissy about Apple vs. Android, let's throw down the highest res screen on any device: the iPhone 4 Retina display at 326 pixels/inch. I care more about how clear my text is than how bright it is.

tjsobieski
tjsobieski

I'm moving to Mexico and it works fine there

seanferd
seanferd

With your recursively retroactive "So there"?

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

What good is a US device outside the US? The Kindle is available across the world regions.