Windows

The hidden gems found in the Windows 7 calculator

Windows 7 calculator

Admittedly, the standard calculator application found in every version of the Microsoft Windows operating system since the beginning is not usually considered sexy, but the new version found in Windows 7 earns props for adding real value. Check out some of the new features found hidden in the menu tree of this often taken for granted free applet.

The Hidden
The Calculator app is located in its typical spot in the Start Menu - under Accessories. Of course, the easiest way to get to the application is to type "calc" in the Start Menu search box as shown.

This gallery is also available as a TechRepublic Microsoft Windows blog post and download. The gallery was originally published in March 2010.
Image created by Mark Kaelin for TechRepublic.

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

28 comments
Slayer_
Slayer_

It told me it was not a valid WIn32 application. Any way to get this new version in XP? it has some functions I'd find useful.

Patrick-Warwick
Patrick-Warwick

Great. Until your article I never thought to even use the calculator.

Grayskull
Grayskull

OHHH Noooo the USA will take over the world via calc's & H2o sytm's !!!!!!!

NassimJD
NassimJD

the only thing missing is basic graphicing functions. well and extending the templates a bit

asafoetida
asafoetida

These features are not hidden at all - they are right there on the menu.

gpopkey
gpopkey

I like the history tape display feature but I'd extend it with a printout capability

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

OK. It ads a few useful features but it's also 7 times the size of Win XP's calculator [excluding DLLs]. From 122KB to 897KB. :-)

Tharg
Tharg

No s**t Sherlock lol

frank_s
frank_s

There's no chance the Windows Calculator will ever get pinned to my desktop until there's a Reverse Polish Notation (ala hp) mode. Although I must admit the Win 7 version is an improvement.

misceng
misceng

The calculation of vehicle leasing and mortgages in UK is quite different than US practice. I do hope they have got temperature calculations right this time. In the first issue of Encarta the calculation was the wrong way round along with several other stupid mistakes.

vandchaynes
vandchaynes

under the edit/history there is an option to copy the history file. You could easily paste that into Word, etc. and print it out.

Computer Dave
Computer Dave

No one has (or will) ever accuse Microsoft coders of being efficient.

shawn.chambers
shawn.chambers

Wouldn't it be nice to browse a download site and be able to add even more features that might be useful for Network Administrators like a IP Subnet calculator function? Math with actual fractions, instead of converting them to decimals first would be cool too.

imsoscareed
imsoscareed

Well, since it is a US company......

obiedude
obiedude

@misceng: If it were UK centric then the EU would add a new lawsuit requiring them to remove Calculator as it would be unfair to European Calculator software companies. @all: By the way, how many copies of XP "N" version or Windows 7 "E" version actually sold?

alan.needham
alan.needham

Wow! This does little more than the pd calculator I have on my WinME machine for years - but is ten times the code size, why? is there an animated bl??dy paperclip? "I see you are trying to add two numbers, would you like me to just distract you or insist on guessing your second number?"

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

That would add about 5MB to the size and will be available in Windows 10 - Ultimate Edition only. In Windows 11 it will be added as well to the Starter edition but not Pro or Enterprise. :-)

kaspencer
kaspencer

BUT Microsoft is guilty of confusing almost every school child who speaks and writes "native English", by its use of American English spelling of the user interface terms (Favorites, Color, Canceled, etc etc) even when the locale is set to UK and a UK keyboard layout is in use. This action leads to corruption of our language which is an important part of any nation's identity. The fact is that the USA has for years committed crimes of fascism against any ideas or culture that is has been unable to claim as its own, and even further, makes claims on ideas and inventions which did not start in the USA (consider encryption technology, the telephone, the incandescent filament lamp, the computer just as a start). Then we have all the one-sided legal claims form the USA involving such processes as extradition and extra-territoriality. It is such a pity that only now has one country raised itself into such a state that it may actually be able to meet the USA head-on (I am thinking of China), and if or when that happens the USA won't know what has hit it! And I make these assertions as an admirer of American commercial and technological development and innovation. In particular, Microsoft's business model, which relies so heavily on users of its products having to re-purchase from scratch, every two to three years, every item of software which they own, certainly has remained virtually unchallenged since about 1980. It is a pity that its approach could not have followed a more moral model whereby all of its software products were actually finished, debugged and complete in themselves before release, rather than abandoned once sales had been judged to have peaked, to be replaced with a new product requiring a new licence. That's my rant for 2012. Happy New Year! Kenneth Spencer

DSchr
DSchr

"Well, since it is a US company... " Yes, but a U.S. company that sells worldwide, which offers versions in foreign languages. So it's quite reasonable to ask for non-U.S. (e.g. Canadian) mortgage options. I know the average American is isolationist and proudly uninformed about the rest of the world, but Microsoft is above that, selling to the world.

malc
malc

This, of course, is current English as acceptably spoken in the UK - also currently known as the Queen's English for obvious reasons. The English do not lock down the spelling of words - English is a living language, as is Americish.

charleswdavis6670
charleswdavis6670

I have a problem with your term "native English." Is it the "Kings English" as in the King James Version of the bible? Do you mean that which was used in 1609? 1776? 1812? At which point did Englishmen lock down the spelling of words? Who was the first person to make a commercially viable incandescent filament lamp? Henry Ford didn't make the first automobile, but his adaptation of standardized component sizes did make production lines viable. On an around the world cruise, as the ship was making its way through the Panama canal, the Panamanian head engineer gave a detailed and well received slide presentation about the operation of the canal's locks. One of the very proper Brits made a snide remark: "he could have at least learned the language." I thought that he did admirably well.

bryant
bryant

Does the UK force people to buy Windows products?