After Hours

Torture Test - Corsair Flash Voyager GT

23 comments
Data Ninja
Data Ninja

I see a great number of flash drives like this (for data recovery) that have been plugged in the back or side of laptops then crammed against walls or items dropped on them, bending the plug and breaking the connections internally. So does this unit stand up to REAL LIFE torture such as this? And will their 10 year warranty covery it + recovery costs?

Jason F
Jason F

I've already returned one of these to Corsair and they replaced it no questions asked. The problem I had was that the rubber around the device made it too thick to plug in with my wireless mouse USB receiver. The wireless mouse receiver is hard plastic - doesn't bend. The Corsair bent at the point where the USB connector meets with the circuit board inside. The rubber coating did not prevent the bending Over time the connection became loose and caused problems. The device would no longer be recognized. I now use the USB extender cable that came with it. Not as portable, but protects the device.

awardb
awardb

I have installed almost a hundred of these devices for clients to use as a backup device. However, I am now finding that they have a hidden weakness: while the rubber coating is neat and cool, there is no plastic or metal outer body as almost all other USB keys have. Therefore, the Voyager series is VERY weak at the point where the USB connector meets the circuit board, as Jason F notes. I just lost a 16GB Voyager to this very problem with a client. It will likely make me rethink my wholehearted recommendation of this line of products, as they are MUCH more easily broken or damaged due to common everyday use while plugged in to a computer. While more conventional USB keys aren't as protected by the rubber coating, they at least are enshrouded in a plastic or metal hard body so that the critical junction I mentioned above is protected. Too bad, because I really had liked these drives up until this point. A fatal flaw, if you ask me.

hellspawn_rj
hellspawn_rj

That's the problem with wide and thick bodies for some USB devices.Blame it on the USB ports which are placed too close to each other. hehe

delboy51
delboy51

It's not the price of the comparison I was concerned with but the principle of whether you hung onto a memory stick forever regardless of what accident came along. Yes, you do need to backup what you store on them as with any storage media, but do you seriously keep a memory stick forever? PS I don't pay $50 for them, I prefer ?3 (~$6) for 512Mb and buy them by the handfull!

boomchuck1
boomchuck1

Recent ad at Fry's had a 1gb flash for under $10 and a 2gb for about $15. Not as cheap as a floppy but getting there. The first floppies I bought were 5.25" DD and would hold 360kb. Cost me $5 in 1983. At the time I could put WordStar and all my term papers on that disk. So, figuring inflation and storage capability perhaps these are as cheap as a floppy!

Data Ninja
Data Ninja

You stated "Anyway they're so cheap now that you throw them away like you would a floppy disk if they break." I don't think comparing a 20 cent 1.4mb floppy to a $50 2gb or > flash drive quite fits... yet. Especially when users often keep critical data on them (dumb move) without a backup. A comparison to a cheap external drive might be more fitting since flash drives are reaching external drive (cheap ones) capacity.

niall
niall

Bloody lame not to test it to total destruction.. why did you wus out? Just get a hammer and finish the job.

delboy51
delboy51

My experience has been that physical damage is by far the greatest risk to these devices. Forget about the occasional dunk in beverage, roasted in oven etc. scenario it's going to break at the connector when it's plugged into the PC. Only exception to this is when they are too big to use the socket without an extension lead ... I had some that were dressed up like mini foolballs about 30mm diameter, almost impossible to pluggin directly. Anyway they're so cheap now that you throw them away like you would a floppy disk if they break.

bladedragonlord
bladedragonlord

More interested in the drive bay device, with USB, eSATA and Firewire. Any ideas on a brand for one of those please? P.S. Well done on testing what companies claim too, the Voyager GT does seem to stand upto it well!

Keith
Keith

Put it in your pocket and walk through the arches at an airport. That WILL be the final test.

Kurse
Kurse

have done this numerous times, has never damaged mine.

ChrisVL
ChrisVL

But my Voyager has survived several trips through the washing machine and drier. That's probably the worst treatment they will get in real life.

hellspawn_rj
hellspawn_rj

Have a little sense of humor once in a while, it could be good for ya

aidplus
aidplus

My watch survived the washing machine test, the dryer test, the freeze to cool down test but it didnt pass the thief test. So Im the weakest link.

Skidoggeruk
Skidoggeruk

I have one of these, have long since lost the little rubber cap thing, once it got a bit used. Also the rubber body no longer stays on the innards, as I once went to take it out too quickly. the stick stayed in the USB and I was left holding the rubber body. Still works fine, but have to be extra careful removing now.

mausmus
mausmus

You can request a new cap. Last time I checked it is free. Corsair also has a 10 year waranty on it. Mine stopped responding (not under abuse, though) and they replaced it no problem.

jrumble
jrumble

I had 2 disintegrate with the same symptoms-you get tired of the RMA process. I just keep upgrading when I see them on sale - these things are disposable - the longest I've ever had any flash drive keep working is around 8 months.

da philster
da philster

Ah yes, boiling, a terrific way to kill viruses!!! I must say that it's a pretty tough device. If it were given the toilet flush test, would that make it a "Flush Drive"?

coderancher
coderancher

So the OS still recognized the drive. But did you check that the data was still intact? It could have been done with checksums of each file before and after the tests. Also, could you still read and write new data to it reliably after that?

coderancher
coderancher

The previous post was not a reply to da philster. It should have been a top level post. How can I get that fixed?

garyspctech
garyspctech

Are you guys serious and this drive still worked after all that. A bigger question is long did it work after the torture test and is it still working today?

CellMIS
CellMIS

for the future of solid-state memory drives though, doesn't it!