Windows 8

Updating screenshots of upcoming Windows 8 features

25 comments
futurenovelist
futurenovelist

Its been so long since it came out that we forget that not everyone wanted what Windows XP had to offer, but we used it for 8 years to the point it became such old hat and simple for us that its hard to move off to anything else. The shocking change to Vista/7 is as massive as the change from 3.1 to 2000 or the change from XP to Vista. I welcome Microsoft's attempts to update and innovate. I also recognize that one shoe doesn't fit all and thus the need for Macs and the various Linux versions, but this article isn't about Apple or Linux, its about Microsoft and the teaser of what is to come. Hopefully Microsoft representatives can sift through the attacks to find the few gems of quality recommendations offered by some in this thread. Personally I enjoy Windows 7 and hope that Win8 is even better. Steven http://www.reddwarfmedia.com

edwardtisdale
edwardtisdale

I haven't seen Win8 yet, but initially I think Win8 is either for rich people who have money to throw away, or for people who never got Win7 or are still stuck with Vista, or people who would have stayed with XP or even in some cases 2k if support had only continued. On my home computer I'm not even going Win7 or 8, I'm on Ubuntu.

AnswerMan
AnswerMan

They haven't even gotten people off of XP yet, let alone 7... and now there's going to be an 8?... I got an idea, how about you make 7 work COMPLETELY first. THEN think about what could be better in a new version... instead of the usual train-wreck of release/patch, release/patch, etc...

da philster
da philster

Agree with most comments. But, at the end of the day, Microsoft is just another business and they need to keep cranking out new (well, at least what appears to be new) products. Shareholders demand nothing less.

pohsibkcir
pohsibkcir

As with ALL versions of Windows, Microsoft's R&D depends an awful lot on the box people can option to select, which asks if they may collect anonymous data from the user. Unfortunately, that entails about 1% of all Windows users, with maybe a fluctuation to about 5%. Statistics from support issues and focus groups also play into the development of a Microsoft Operating System. But now we see something very different from Microsoft ... A 'reactionary' Operating System, based on the Business model and relying heavily on the developed usage of Cloud Computing. As an IT Consultant, I will adit that Cloud Computing represents a 'Death Knell' to the IT industry as it stands today. But, when Best Buy came up with the "Geek Squad", it pretty much rubber stamped how IT tasks and professionals were going to be trivialized and outsourced. Overnight, the hourly wage of an IT Professional was cut in half. Most all of tech support for major software firms is outsourced to India. Yet, before we find ourselves in Panic mode, there is an opportunity for the IT Industry to reassert itself as one of the most necessary components of any Business Model. We can do this by learning the technology better than anyone one else ... That includes the new Windows 7 Search as well as the Ribbon technology. With the former, aearch can be implimented from any explorer window and with the latter, the Ribbon ... There are drawacks, but they are issues, mostly on the side of the programmer forgetting to put in some piece of funtionality, or putting it in the wrong place. But the ribbon offers the programmer and the end user an array of functionality beyond the standard; "FILE: EDIT: VIEW ..." as we are currently familiar with. We can rest assured that by the time Windows 8 becomes final, there will be a host of tweaks readily available to placate even the most stubborn of IT Centurians. As an side, someone mentioned the Disk Mounting was a Linux thing. For those of us who have been playing with computers since the late 1970s ... A disk had to be mounted at the start of a computing session and disounted before shutting down. Back then it was referred to as; Opening and Parking the hard disk.

paradoxstorm
paradoxstorm like.author.displayName 1 Like

As far as an operating system goes, I'm very happy with 7. I like the new features in the gallery. The ISO mount will be a blessing. I always like when a feature that is common used through third-party software is incorporated into an OS as long as it works well. There are 2 problems with Win 7 that I do hope they fix in 8. 1) They took away the ability for an administrator to force a user logoff at the login screen. It was a feature that was very helpful in XP and I'd like to see it make a return. 2) FOR THE LOVE OF GOD give us back the old search features we had in XP. The search feature in Win 7, while you can narrow down searches cannot do it as easily as in XP. I'm not one of those people who whines about Windows XP being the greatest OS ever. I am, in fact, a die hard Win 7 user. However, there are a few features that were eliminated in Windows 7 that were quite functional that I would like to see re-implemented in Windows 8.

JanAlbert
JanAlbert

If there is one feature in Win7 that I hate, it is search. Unless you set all sorts of extra parameters, it comes up with more junk than you've ever wanted -- and just opening a largish map can take ages as the catalog is updated. If I want to know what's in a map, the old command line is faster....

pethers
pethers like.author.displayName 1 Like

... if all you want to do is complain about what you're looking at... Get a life... go look at something you're actually intrerested in.

seanferd
seanferd

I'm probably more interested in the comments here than the actual gallery, which looks like just more junk tacked on to Windows. ISO mounting? Too late, really. Ribbon? Bah. Restore function, if it works well, might be nice. I wonder if that will ship on OEM versions.

norm7446
norm7446

Disc Mounting . Is this not a Linux Copyright. Next thing with Windows 8, they will have the log off button down on the bottom right hand side of the screen, just like in Gnome if you put the top bar at the bottom of the screen...... ( For the readers information. The last part was imputed one key press at at time. Each key press took longer than the one before ). Hold on is that not just what is now happening with Win8. Does anyone know a good IP lawyer. As Linux did this first. So I got Bagsies.

boomchuck1
boomchuck1

Gee, I was mounting disks and volumes in Novell NetWare 3.11 and earlier. I think Linux probably stole the idea from Novell! :-P

seanferd
seanferd like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

All sorts of applications mount ISOs, etc. Linux and OSS apps are hardly alone in this. UI features, like where you have a logoff function, are hardly IP. Many, many UIs share features. You usually don't see "mounting" in Windows because it automounts nearly everything without user input, and rarely refers to mounting.

Slayer_
Slayer_ like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

A few good features there, a full reset. Hopefully they finally fix their mistake of making 6 different versions and placing mismatching feature sets in each one. Just wish that ribbon would die.

DWalker88001
DWalker88001 like.author.displayName 1 Like

The ribbon has nothing to do with Windows; it's part of Office. They are two different things. And Windows 7 was specifically designed where the feature sets for more-expensive versions would completely encompass the feature sets of the lower versions. This "mistake" existed in Windows XP and maybe Vista, but absolutely is not a mistake in Windows 7. So you're zero for two. As for the ribbon, their researchers didn't watch everyone in the world, but they watched lots of people. Word 2003 had hundreds of sub-menu items, and it was getting hard to find things. The Ribbon is easier once you give it a couple of weeks.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Its a damn shame they made it so confusing, XP pro is just in general better equipped over XP Home, and required less system resources. Two versions, do you want the fatter less featured version, or the thinner highly featured one? Pretty easy choice compared to now.

djo165
djo165

If you look at picture 12, you'll see that the Ribbon is now part of Windows as well. At least in one part.

pethers
pethers like.author.displayName 1 Like

They didn't just create the Ribbon because it looks pretty... It's based on actual factual data about how each app is used - the most common commands required and it is context sensitive. The large size is due to making it work easier for touch screen PC's... There are actually good reasons for these changes - they don't just pull them out of their backside when they're drunk! Has 'anyone' got anything constructive to say??? Or is this Comments area just for losers who just want to be negative about everything they look at???

edwardtisdale
edwardtisdale

Not a bad reason for it, if that's what you want

David A. Pimentel
David A. Pimentel

I assert their research was flawed in that it did not consider those of us thousands of users that could actually find stuff in the old menu-style configuration. The bloody ribbons are an ever-evolving mess of confusion that must be relearned every time I open a different "ribboned" application.

Slayer_
Slayer_ like.author.displayName 1 Like

As you say, based on actual factual data? Really? No MS rep came and sat and watched me how I used my computer, if they did, they would have saw I press backspace to go up one level, and almost never click the back button cause the back button gets confusing when you move back and forth through several folder structures. They would have seen that 95% of the time, I type out the file path in the address bar. Bigger buttons for touch screens? If that is so, why not give an option for the 99.99999999999% of us not using touch screens??? Context sensitive? The old task pane was context sensitive, and that was often irritating, but usable. In Office, and other products, the first thing I turn off is the "hide menus unless I need them" options and I immediately display all toolbar items because I don't like having to hunt them down each time. Pull them out while they are drunk, actually, according to XKCD, they probably do. http://xkcd.com/323/

a.portman
a.portman like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

A great many of Win 7's functions are the same tired control panels we have all seen for ten years with a new layer you need to click through to get to the control you want to change. New art is not a new feature.

seanferd
seanferd

Is it the old or normal control panel structure and apps, or is it the sixty-five thousand layers you need to click through in a modern flavor of Windows? Both? I personally prefer the older style, but the cpl apps themselves could stand some reorganization into larger modal dialog boxes with less click-through.

edwardtisdale
edwardtisdale

Every Linux distribution already has more than 1 UI do choose from to use, with no extra charge. Why use anything else? ex: Ubuntu has Gnome, KDE, and now Unity