Windows 8

Who's making the move to Windows 8?

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

9 comments
tms123
tms123

As I've said here regarding other misleading, unscientific-as-hell, so-called "surveys", you can make up any numbers you want. The reality is this: it's far, far too early to tell what will happen with Win8. History should be studied for a good reason kids. You'll find that shortly after every major release of an MS OS, there have been a flurry of "75% of organizations will NOT make the upgrade" articles. What a bunch of hogwash. Timing is everything. And I distinctly remember predictions around the early to mid-90s that the PC had NO place in a business setting and would "ultimately fail". Shame on TechRepublic for trying to yank so many gullible chains.

grayknight
grayknight

on all my main computers. One older one is waiting for when I have time to upgrade it. At work, web development, I'm on Windows 8 with Visual Studio 2012. It works great and the underlying changes have made serious improvements well worth the upgrade. As far as the Start Screen/Menu, it isn't a problem. I did add Gadgets back, so I can have clocks on the desktop, since only one taskbar has the clock on it. I do wish I could run 2 (or more) metro apps on 2 monitors at the same time. Once they have that, then we have everything we need.

alfred
alfred

I am now a home user with a very elderly PC running Win XP. It has several programs which I use frequently but will not run on Win 7 or 8. The upgrades for Win 7 are like so many nowadays with changes for the worse just to make them different to sell as new ideas. I find the upgrades unusable and want to find the best way to buy a version of Win 8 on a new PC which will allow me to transfer and run Win XP with the programs I need.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

load something like Zorin OS Linux with the Win XP look alike GUI and WINE to run your Win XP programs. I very sincerely doubt you can buy a new PC from a vendor without it coming with Win 8 on it. You could buy a desktop PC built from components at a mom and pop type store and load what you like.

TNT
TNT

It's hardly a tablet OS. Don't get me wrong, it was built with tablets in mind, but its a great desktop OS. I know most corporations skip every other release, but the speed of Win 8 Pro is remarkable. Even on older hardware. And its compatible with just about everything Win 7 can run. Those who haven't tried it need to. I'm writing this in IE 10 now, and loving it!

ebishop2
ebishop2 like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

Windows 7 is still replacing Windows XP; why make those that have just learned Windows 7 learn what appears to be a tablet OS? Our enterprise really likes what Microsoft has done with Windows 7. You're right about those who will deploy it- home and less experienced users who buy new computers. I think Win 8 will have to do something spectacular to make users want to upgrade their desktops.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest like.author.displayName 1 Like

Win 8 and not a 'real OS' as they see it. And those who cancel the order when told Win 8 is their only option.

spawnywhippet
spawnywhippet like.author.displayName 1 Like

I guess almost all the people who will 'deploy' Win 8 are the less technical home users who get it pre-installed on a new PC. A few home users will upgrade from an earlier OS. I imagine that if other business's Proof of Concept testing went anything like ours did, very very few businesses will consider an 'upgrade' to Win 8 due to the enormous productivy loss, extensive retraining requirements, increased helpdesk calls and application redevelopment costs.