Laptops

XP and Vista on the MacBook Pro

Parallels for Mac

ZDNet blogger, Adrian W Kingsley-Hughes wanted to run Windows XP and Windows Vista on a MacBook. To accomplish this task, he downloaded Apple BootCamp and Parallels for Mac. He used BootCamp to run XP and Parallels for Windows Vista RTM. This gallery shows you the installation process for each application and what Windows XP and Vista look like running on a MacBook.

Installing Parallels

Credit: Adrian W Kingsley-Hughes

11 comments
MNosal@monitortech.com
MNosal@monitortech.com

Why not use Parallels for both Windows platform installations?

leobabur
leobabur

Apple boot camp enables a Macbook or Intel based Mac systems to host Windows OS in Real, i.e. now all resources of system becomes available to a single OS. Current version of Apple Boot Camp Supports only Windows XP it needs to be upgrade to install windows vista standalone. While any virtual Machine softwares enables your machine to host multiple OS on a single PC and all resources are shared between OSes to perform their activities. One can install both XP and Vista with parallels but it will certainly slow down the machine even as slow as 0. So it should be care to install especially Vista in Virtaul Machine.

drsullivan
drsullivan

Parallels is great and definitely has its place. You can even use your boot camp OS in Parallels. Any OS uses disk space so no advantage there, but boot camp can not be suspended by Parallels, must restart every time, but an OS setup using Parallels can be suspended. Rember though, using Parallels, you are sharing all resources with two OSs running at the same time. Boot camp is restarting in only one OS giving full resources to that one OS, so it has to work better at everything and in every way than vitalization. I use both. :-)

bimc
bimc

Don't know an exact response to your question Nosal however it seems that BootCamp was the original routine tailored for WinXP installation on the MAC. However Parallel seems a little different just as Vista is Different from XP. Microsoft and other Beta testers have said that Vista best installs not as an upgrade from XP (ie with XP running) but as a clean install from the boot.. Hmmm. What I find amazing is that MAC OSX can host both of these (rather large) operating systems on such a platform as the laptop machine and not crash during the installation or the installation of other software... Where is APPLE Marketing in promoting this capabiltiy..?? Steve J, are you listening or observing..

armandoemail
armandoemail

I would recommend you to use parallels, It wors just fine, its very easy to install and you dont have to do a partition in your have drive, You can handle windows as any other application on your mac. It what it is.

kcpatel
kcpatel

VM limits video memory to something absurdly small (like 8-16MB), which is why Parallels is not ideal for graphics intensive application. I run AutoCad in just basic 2D mode with no rendering and can tell the difference. Applications run at native speeds in Parallels, but the IO interface is what lags behind because of the video memory. Everything runs fine in Boot Camp plus I can use Parallels for most other things. Best of both worlds! Running Vista Ultimate on MacBook Pro 15" w/ 2Gb memory, 160 GB HD (split 50/50 between OSX and Vista), 256 MB video.

MNosal@monitortech.com
MNosal@monitortech.com

I've hosted WinXP Pro w/SP2+ on a Macbook Pro and it seems to run at native speed using Parallel. VMWare ran well also but the VNic speed was limited on the betaware. Having both platforms (XP/OS X) running with share storage is a nice plus for some positions such as WebMaster, Network Admin, etc.. I never pursued Bootcamp and was trying to discover any advantage it might provide. Perhaps the article was just trying to cover multiple vantage points. Thanks for you input.

MNosal@monitortech.com
MNosal@monitortech.com

The MacBook pro has a Core2Duo. Are the Vdrivers unable to utilize the h/w virualization from within the host OS?

mistakidis
mistakidis

Yes all virtual drivers untill now has no or limmited 3D capability (Beta stage in VMWare) and in any case they will be speed penaltys due to software virtualization. The real solution will be H/W virtualization thas is already inside Intels Core 2 Duo.

MNosal@monitortech.com
MNosal@monitortech.com

Do you know if this is a limit of all virtual drivers? IE Vmware. Thank You in advance for your response

mineakey
mineakey

Parrallel is great but can not do 3D applications such as gaming, this is do the limitations of the driver via a virtual machine. Boot Camp runs a normal enviroment which is more than capable of handling intense 3D apps, such as (games, CAD, etc.)