Carnegie Mellon University

Displaying 161-200 of 529 results

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    Scheduling Heterogeneous Processors Isn't As Easy As You Think

    The authors consider preemptive online scheduling algorithms to minimize the total weighted/unweighted flow time plus energy for speed-scalable heterogeneous multiprocessors. They show that the well-known priority scheduling algorithms highest density first, weighted shortest elapsed time first, and weighted late arrival processor sharing, are not O(1)-speed O(1)-competitive for the objective of...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    Improving Cache Performance Using Victim Tag Stores

    With increasing pressure on memory bandwidth, there have been a number of proposals that improve the cache replacement policy. These mechanisms monitor the cache blocks while they are in the cache and evict blocks that are deemed to have low temporal locality. However, a majority of these mechanisms are agnostic...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    All Your Jammers Belong to Us - Localization of Wireless Sensors Under Jamming Attack

    Accurately determining locations of nodes in mobile wireless network is crucial for a myriad of applications. Unfortunately, most localization techniques are vulnerable to jamming attacks where the adversary attempts to disrupt communication between legitimate nodes in the network. In this paper, the authors propose an approach to localize a wireless...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    A Learning Theory Approach to Non-Interactive Database Privacy

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate that, ignoring computational constraints, it is possible to privately release synthetic databases that are useful for large classes of queries - much larger in size than the database itself. Specifically, they give a mechanism that privately releases synthetic data for a class of queries...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    SAV-V: Securing Anti-Virus with Virtualization

    Today's desktop PCs rely on security software such as anti-virus products and personal firewalls for protection. Unfortunately, malware authors have adapted by specifically targeting and disabling these defenses, a practice exacerbated by the rise in zero-day exploits. In this paper, the authors present the design, implementation, and evaluation of SAV-V,...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    A High-Performance Hierarchical Ring On-Chip Interconnect with Low-Cost Routers

    Energy consumption of routers in commonly used mesh-based on-chip networks for chip multiprocessors is an increasingly important concern: these routers consist of a crossbar and complex control logic and can require significant buffers, hence high energy and area consumption. In contrast, an alternative design uses ring-based networks to connect network...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    Adaptive Cluster Throttling: Improving High-Load Performance in Bufferless On-Chip Networks

    Higher core counts and increasing focus on energy efficiency in modern Chip Multi-Processors (CMP) have led to renewed interest in simple and energy-efficient Network-on-Chip (NoC) designs. Several recent proposed designs trade off network capacity for efficiency, based on the observation that traditional networks are overprovisioned for many workloads. Bufferless routing...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    Row Buffer Locality-Aware Data Placement in Hybrid Memories

    Phase Change Memory (PCM) is a promising alternative to DRAM, though its high latency and energy costs prohibit its adoption as a drop-in DRAM replacement. Hybrid memory systems comprising DRAM and PCM attempt to achieve the low access latencies of DRAM at the large capacities of PCM. However, known solutions...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    Network Fault Localization With Small TCB

    Clear evidence indicates the existence of compromised routers in ISP and enterprise networks. Fault Localization (FL) protocols enable a network to localize specific links of compromised routers sabotaging network data delivery and are recognized as an essential means to enhancing network availability in the face of targeted attacks. However, theoretically...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    Time Boxing Planning: Buffered Moscow Rules

    Time boxing is a management technique which prioritizes schedule over deliverables but time boxes which are merely a self, or an outside, imposed target without agreed partial outcomes and justified certainty are at best, an expression of good will on the part of the team. This paper proposes the use...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Investigating the Viability of Bufferless NoCs in Modern Chip Multi-Processor Systems

    Chip Multi-Processors (CMP) are quickly growing to dozens and potentially hundreds of cores, and as such the design of the interconnect for on chip resources has become an important field of study. Of the available topologies, tiled mesh networks are an appealing approach in tiled CMPs, as they are relatively...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Q: Exploit Hardening Made Easy

    Modern operating systems have since enabled address randomization (ASLR), which randomizes the location of libc, making these techniques unusable in practice. However, modern ASLR implementations leave smaller amounts of executable code unrandomized and it has been unclear whether an attacker can use these small code fragments to construct payloads in...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    All Your Droid are Belong to Us: A Survey of Current Android Attacks

    In the past few years, mobile devices (Smartphones, PDAs) have seen both their computational power and their data connectivity rise to a level nearly equivalent to that available on small desktop computers, while becoming ubiquitous. On the downside, these mobile devices are now an extremely attractive target for large-scale security...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jul 2011

    Congestion Control for Scalability in Bufferless On-Chip Networks

    In this paper, the authors present Network-on-Chip (NoC) design and contrast it to traditional network design, highlighting both similarities and differences between NoCs and traditional networks. As an initial case study, they examine network congestion in bufferless NoCs. They show that congestion manifests itself differently in a NoC than in...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jul 2011

    Secure Distributed Data Aggregation

    The authors present a survey of the various families of approaches to secure aggregation in distributed networks such as sensor networks. In their survey, they focus on the important algorithmic features of each approach, and provide an overview of a family of secure aggregation protocols which use resilient distributed estimation...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    Predicting Handoffs in 3G Networks

    Cellular data networks have recently seen an explosion in their usage due to the widespread deployment of 3G technologies and the rapid proliferation of smartphones. People are increasingly using their smartphones on the go and expect always-on, high quality connectivity at all times. A key network primitive that enables continuous...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    Resource Sharing in GPU-Accelerated Windowing Systems

    Recent windowing systems allow graphics applications to directly access the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for fast rendering. However, application tasks that render frames on the GPU contend heavily with the windowing server that also accesses the GPU to blit the rendered frames to the screen. This resource-sharing nature of direct...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    A Loadable Task Execution Recorder for Hierarchical Scheduling in Linux

    In this paper, the authors present a Hierarchical Scheduling Framework (HSF) recorder for Linux-based operating systems. The HSF recorder is a loadable kernel module that is capable of recording tasks and servers without requiring any kernel modifications. Hence, it complies with the reliability and stability requirements in the area of...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    Lucy in the Sky Without Diamonds: Stealing Confidential Data in the Cloud

    Cloud computing is a recent paradigm that is creating high expectations about benefits such as the pay-per-use model and elasticity of resources. However, with this optimism come also concerns about security. In a public cloud, the user's data storage and processing is no longer done inside its premises, but in...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    TFP During A Credit Crunch

    The financial crisis of 2008 was followed by sharp contractions in aggregate output and employment and an unusual increase in aggregate Total Factor Productivity (TFP). This paper attempts to explain these facts by modeling the creation and destruction of jobs in the presence of heterogeneity in firm productivity and frictional...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    The Effect of Online Privacy Information on Purchasing Behavior: An Experimental Study

    Although online retailers detail their privacy practices in online privacy policies, this information often remains invisible to consumers, who seldom make the effort to read and understand those policies. This paper reports on research undertaken to determine whether a more prominent display of privacy information will cause consumers to incorporate...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Towards Secure Multi-Path Routing for Wireless Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks: A Cross-Layer Strategy

    Multi-path routing establishes multiple paths between a source and destination node in a network. This helps in achieving reliability in Mobile Ad-hoc NETworks (MANETs). To achieve efficient, secure and reliable multi-path routing for MANETs, the authors propose a routing mechanism that uses cross-layer strategies. The cross-layer strategy involves incorporating feedback...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    A Proof-Carrying File System With Revocable and Use-Once Certificates

    The authors present the design and implementation of a file system which allows authorizations dependent on revocable and use-once policy certificates. Authorizations require explicit proof objects, combining ideas from previous authorization logics and Girard's linear logic. Use-once certificates and revocations lists are maintained in a database that is consulted during...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    New Modalities for Access Control Logics: Permission, Control and Ratification

    The authors present a new modal access control logic ACL+ to specify, reason about and enforce access control policies. The logic includes new modalities for permission, control, and ratification to overcome some limits of current access control logics. They present a Hilbert-style proof system for ACL+ and a sound and...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Application-to-Core Mapping Policies to Reduce Interference in On-Chip Networks

    As the industry moves toward many-core processors, Network-on-Chips (NoCs) will likely become the communication backbone of future microprocessor designs. The NoC is a critical shared resource and its effective utilization is essential for improving overall system performance and fairness. In this paper, the authors propose application-to-core mapping policies to reduce...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Traffic Information Systems: Efficient Message Dissemination Via Adaptive Beaconing

    Traffic Information Systems (TIS) are one of the key non-safety application areas of Vehicular Ad Hoc NETworks (VANETs). As such, TIS are much less delay sensitive compared to safety applications, which have recently attracted a lot of attention in VANET research. The authors propose a new message dissemination protocol, Adaptive...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Exertion-Based Billing for Cloud Storage Access

    Charging for cloud storage must account for two costs: the cost of the capacity used and the cost of access to that capacity. For the cost of access, current systems focus on the paper requested, such as data transferred or I/O operations completed, rather than the exertion (i.e., effort/resources expended)...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Privacy-Sensitive VM Retrospection

    The success of cloud computing leads to large centralized collections of Virtual Machine (VM) images. The ability to retrospect (examine the historical state of) these images at a high semantic level can be valuable in many aspects of IT management such as debugging and troubleshooting, software quality control, legal establishment...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Curbing Android Permission Creep

    The Android platform has about 130 application level permissions that govern access to resources. The determination of which permissions to request is left solely to the application developer. Users are prompted to approve all application permissions at install time, and permissions are silently enforced at execution time. Although many applications...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    A Picture IsWorth a ThousandWords: Improving Usability and Robustness of Online Recommendation Systems

    Recent statistics show that the number of online shoppers are increasing where the majority of them use online recommendation systems for product/service reviews. Although online reviews are becoming increasingly important, consumers face two major challenges of usability and robustness when they make purchase decisions based on the available reviews. More...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Talking to Yourself for Fun and Profit

    Browsers limit how web sites can access the network. Historically, the web platform has limited web sites to HTTP, but HTTP is inefficient for a number of applications - including chat and multiplayer games - for which raw socket access is more appropriate. Java, Flash Player, and HTML5 provide socket...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Social Forwarding in Large Scale Networks: Insights Based on Real Trace Analysis

    Social forwarding, recently a hot topic in mobile opportunistic networking, faces extreme challenges from potentially large numbers of mobile nodes, vast areas, and limited communication resources. Such conditions render forwarding more challenging in large-scale networks. The authors observe that forwarding techniques based on social popularity fail to efficiently forward messages...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Digital Filter Design for Jamming Mitigation in 802.15.4 Communication

    Jamming attackers can dramatically increase attack efficiency and stealth by randomly or periodically cycling the jamming transmission on and off, attacks respectively known as random and periodic jamming. In this paper, the authors analyze the impact of such attacks on the IEEE 802.15.4 communication protocol, commonly used in wireless sensor...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Disks Are Like Snowflakes: No Two Are Alike

    Gone are the days of homogeneous sets of disks. Even disks of a given batch, of the same make and model, will have significantly different bandwidths. This paper describes the disk technology trends responsible for the now-inherent heterogeneity of multi-disk systems and disk-based clusters, provides measurements quantifying it, and discusses...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • Webcasts // May 2011

    Introduction to the SOA Architect Professional Certificate With Grace Lewis

    In this video the presenter discusses why the SEI is offering the SOA certificate and the importance of knowing how the service-oriented architectural style affects a system's quality attributes (e.g., security, performance, and modifiability). She talks about her primary goals in teaching the SOA courses, the three main takeaways SOA...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • Webcasts // May 2011

    Introduction to the SOA Architect Professional Certificate With Dennis Smith

    In this video, the presenter, SOA course instructor and lead of the SEI System-of-Systems Performance team, discusses why the SEI is offering the SOA certificate and why basic architecture principles and practices are even more important to effective SOA adoption than to single system development. He also explains his primary...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    FOG: Fairness in Mobile Opportunistic Networking

    The fundamental challenge in opportunistic networking, regardless of the application, is when and how to forward a message. Rank-based forwarding techniques currently represent one of the most promising methods for addressing this message forwarding challenge. While these techniques have demonstrated great efficiency in performance, they do not address the rising...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    Nash Equilibria for Weakest Target Security Games with Heterogeneous Agents

    Motivated attackers cannot always be blocked or deterred. In the physical-world security context, examples include suicide bombers and sexual predators. In computer networks, zero-day exploits unpredictably threaten the information economy and end users. In this paper, the authors study the conflicting incentives of individuals to act in the light of...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    R-BATCH: Task Partitioning for Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems

    Many emerging embedded real-time applications such as SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition), autonomous vehicles and advanced avionics, require a high degree of dependability. Dealing with tasks having both hard real-time requirements and high reliability constraints is a key challenge faced in such systems. This paper addresses the problem of...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    The Case for VOS: The Vector Operating System

    Operating systems research for many-core systems has recently focused its efforts on supporting the scalability of OS-intensive applications running on increasingly parallel hardware. Lost amidst the march towards this parallel future is efficiency: perfectly parallel software may saturate the parallel capabilities of the host system, but in doing so can...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2010

    Java Concurrency Guidelines

    An essential element of secure coding in the Java programming language is well-documented and enforceable coding standards. Coding standards encourage programmers to follow a uniform set of guidelines determined by the requirements of the project and organization, rather than by the programmer's familiarity or preference. Once established, these standards can...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Aug 2009

    Impact of Clustering on the BER Performance of Ad Hoc Wireless Networks

    Ad hoc wireless networks are characterized by multi-hop radio communications. The spatial distribution of the nodes is seldom perfectly regular. In particular, in a realistic ad hoc wireless network communication scenario, the nodes are likely to be clustered, i.e., to configure themselves in subgroups such that the nodes inside each...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2010

    Mobile Computing: the Next Decade

    Information at the fingertips anywhere, anytime has been the driving vision of mobile computing for the past two decades. Through relentless pursuit of this vision, spurring innovations in wireless technology, energy-efficient portable hardware and adaptive software, we have now largely attained this goal. Ubiquitous email and Web access is a...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Mar 2009

    On Internet Availability: Where Does Path Choice Matter?

    Today's Internet availability is low, despite the efforts of organizations to improve failure resilience through multi-homing. In this paper, the authors analyze where and how much exposure to topology is needed to best improve availability without sacrificing scalability. Through this analysis, they find that exposing choice of the first and...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Energy-Efficient Cluster Computing With FAWN: Workloads and Implications

    This paper presents the architecture and motivation for a cluster-based, many-core computing architecture for energy-efficient, data-intensive computing. FAWN, a Fast Array of Wimpy Nodes, consists of a large number of slower but efficient nodes coupled with low-power storage. The authors present the computing trends that motivate a FAWN-like approach, for...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2009

    FAWNdamentally Power-Efficient Clusters

    Power is becoming an increasingly large financial and scaling burden for computing and society. The costs of running large data centers are becoming dominated by power and cooling to the degree that companies such as Microsoft and Google have built new data centers close to large and cost-efficient hydroelectric power...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Dec 2008

    Usable Key Agreement in Home Networks

    With the rapid emergence of new home networking technologies and proliferation of devices that use them, innovation has focused on rich functionality and largely ignored the associated security threats. The heterogeneous set of home appliances, their varied communication mediums, the lack of any ubiquitous standard to manage the communication across...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Access Control for Home Data Sharing: Attitudes, Needs and Practices

    As digital content becomes more prevalent in the home, nontechnical users are increasingly interested in sharing that content with others and accessing it from multiple devices. Not much is known about how these users think about controlling access to this data. To better understand this, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-situ...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Encountering Stronger Password Requirements: User Attitudes and Behaviors

    Text-based passwords are still the most commonly used authentication mechanism in information systems. The authors took advantage of a unique opportunity presented by a significant change in the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) computing services password policy that required users to change their passwords. Through the survey of 470 CMU computer...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    QMAS: Querying, Mining and Summarization of Multi-Modal Databases

    Given a large collection of images, very few of which have labels given a priori, how can the authors automatically assign the labels of the remaining majority, and make suggestion for images that may need brand new labels distinct from existing ones? Popular automatic labeling techniques usually scale super linearly...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2010

    Reusing Migration to Simply and Efficiently Implement Multi-Server Operations in Transparently Scalable Storage Systems

    Distributed file systems that scale by partitioning files and directories among a collection of servers inevitably encounter multi-server operations. A common example is a RENAME that moves a file from a directory managed by one server to a directory managed by another. Transparently scalable systems (those that provide the same...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    Effective Network Management Via System-Wide Coordination and Optimization

    As networked systems grow and traffic patterns evolve, management applications are increasing in complexity and functionality. To address the requirements of these management applications, equipment vendors and administrators today depend on incremental solutions that increase the complexity of network elements and deployment costs for operators. Despite this increased complexity and...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Algorithms and Models for Problems in Networking

    Many interesting theoretical problems arise from computer networks. In this paper the authors will consider three of them: algorithms and data structures for problems involving distances in networks (in particular compact routing schemes, distance labels, and distance oracles), algorithms for wireless capacity and scheduling problems, and algorithms for optimizing iBGP...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2010

    An Access Network Architecture for Neighborhood-scale Multimedia Delivery

    Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are in a constant race to meet the bandwidth demands of their subscribers. Access link upgrades, however, are expensive and take years to deploy. Many ISPs are looking for alternative solutions to reduce the need for continuous and expensive infrastructure expansion. This paper shows that there...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2010

    Network-Wide Deployment of Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems

    Traditional research efforts for scaling NIDS and NIPS systems using parallelization and hardware-assisted acceleration have largely focused on a single-vantage-point view. In this chapter, the authors explore a different design alternative that exploits spatial, network-wide opportunities for distributing NIDS and NIPS functions throughout a network. They present systematic models that...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2010

    Locally Distributed Predicates: A Technique for Distributed Programming

    New research in wireless networks, sensor networks, and modular robotics has spurred renewed interest in distributed programming techniques. Distributed programming is inherently more difficult than its single-threaded equivalent, due to the need for an executing thread of a distributed program located at one computation node to access state located at...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Pocket ISR: Virtual Machines Anywhere

    The Internet Suspend/Resume system provides access to a user's computing state anytime and anywhere - so long as there's an ISR client handy. The authors introduce Pocket ISR, a Linux distribution which can be installed on a USB key and booted on any borrowed PC to quickly provide a complete...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    The Manna Plug-In Architecture for Content-Based Search of VM Clouds

    As cloud computing becomes more popular, collections of Virtual Machine (VM) images are growing in size. Management of VM collections requires the ability to inspect and search data stored within VM images. The authors present a plug-in-based architecture, called Manna, for efficiently searching state within VM images through both index...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Energy-Efficient Dynamic Capacity Provisioning in Server Farms

    A central question in designing server farms today is how to efficiently provision the number of servers to handle unpredictable demand patterns, so as to extract the best performance while not wasting energy. While one would like to turn servers off when they become idle to save energy, the large...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Understanding Route Aggregation

    Route aggregation, the method to supersede a set of routes by a single, more general route, is a universal mechanism that is either explicitly included in a routing protocol specification or added by router vendors as a configuration option. Widely deployed for both intra-domain and inter-domain routing purposes, Route Aggregation...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    XIA: An Architecture for an Evolvable and Trustworthy Internet

    Motivated by limitations in today's host-based IP network architecture, recent studies have proposed clean-slate network architectures centered around alternate first-class principals, such as content, services, or users. However, much like the host-centric IP design, elevating one principal type above others hinders communication between other principals and inhibits the network's capability...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Authenticated Communication and Computation in Known-Topology Networks With a Trusted Authority

    The authors show that two distinguishing properties of sensor networks, i.e., the presence of a trusted base station, and the pre-knowledge of the fixed network topology, can yield security protocols that are both communication-efficient and highly general. They show new protocols for broadcast authentication, credential dissemination and node-to-node signatures. For...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Hyrax: Cloud Computing on Mobile Devices Using MapReduce

    Today's smartphones operate independently of each other, using only local computing, sensing, networking, and storage capabilities and functions provided by remote Internet services. It is generally difficult or expensive for one smartphone to share data and computing resources with another. Data is shared through centralized services, requiring expensive uploads and...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Coding Without Your Crystal Ball: Unanticipated Object-Oriented Reuse

    In many ways, existing languages place unrealistic expectations on library and framework designers, allowing some varieties of client reuse only if it is explicitly - sometimes manually - supported. Instead, the authors should aim for the ideal: a language design that reduces the amount of prognostication that is required on...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Formal Methods for Privacy

    Privacy means something different to everyone. Against a vast and rich canvas of diverse types of privacy rights and violations, the authors argue technology's dual role in privacy: new technologies raise new threats to privacy rights and new technologies can help preserve privacy. Formal methods, as just one class of...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jul 2009

    Chip Multiprocessors for Server Workloads

    The authors stand on the cusp of the giga-scale era of chip integration. Technological advancements in semiconductor fabrication yield ever-smaller and faster devices, enabling billion-transistor chips with multi-gigahertz clock frequencies. To utilize the abundant transistors on chip, modern processors pack an exponentially increasing number of cores on chip, multi-megabyte caches,...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jul 2009

    Efficient Byzantine Fault Tolerance for Scalable Storage and Services

    Distributed systems experience and should tolerate faults beyond simple component crashes as such systems grow in size and importance. Unfortunately, tolerating arbitrary faults, also known as Byzantine faults, poses several challenges to system designers, often limiting performance, requiring additional hardware, or both. This dissertation presents new protocols that provide substantially...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Distributed Throughput-Optimal Scheduling in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks

    In this paper, the authors propose a distributed throughput optimal ad hoc wireless network scheduling algorithm, which is motivated by the celebrated simplex algorithm for solving Linear Programming (LP) problems. The scheduler stores a sparse set of basic schedules, and chooses the max-weight basic schedule for transmission in each time...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Distributed Consensus Algorithms in Sensor Networks: Quantized Data and Random Link Failures

    The paper studies the problem of distributed average consensus in sensor networks with quantized data and random link failures. To achieve consensus, dither (small noise) is added to the sensor states before quantization. When the quantizer range is unbounded (countable number of quantizer levels), stochastic approximation shows that consensus is...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2010

    Scheduling in Wireless Networks Under Uncertainties: A Greedy Primal-Dual Approach

    This paper proposes a dynamic primal-dual type algorithm to solve the optimal scheduling problem in wireless networks subject to uncertain parameters, which are generated by stochastic network processes such as random packet arrivals, channel fading, and node mobilities. The algorithm is a generalization of the well-known max-weight scheduling algorithm proposed...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    Sensor Selection for Event Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks

    The authors consider the problem of sensor selection for event detection in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). They want to choose a subset of p out of n sensors that yields the best detection performance. As the sensor selection optimality criteria, they propose the Kullback-Leibler and Chernoff distances between the distributions...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Mar 2009

    How Do Wireless Chains Behave? the Impact of MAC Interactions

    In a Multi-hop Wireless Networks (MHWN), packets are routed between source and destination using a chain of intermediate nodes; chains are a fundamental communication structure in MHWNs whose behavior must be understood to enable building effective protocols. The behavior of chains is determined by a number of complex and interdependent...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    The Case for Content Search of VM Clouds

    The success of cloud computing can lead to large, centralized collections of Virtual Machine (VM) images. The ability to interactively search these VM images at a high semantic level emerges as an important capability. This paper examines the opportunities and challenges in creating such a search capability, and presents early...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2010

    Competitive Responses Of Pricing, Advertising And Product Premium To Consumer Reviews

    Consumer product reviews, one of the earliest forms of online user generated contents, play a very significant role in consumer buying decisions as they help consumers resolve or reduce uncertainties about product features and qualities before their purchases. The authors provide a game-theoretic model to study as to how consumer...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Sep 2010

    Bringing the Cloud Down to Earth: Transient PCs Everywhere

    The convergence of cloud computing with mobile computing opens the door to the creation of new applications and services that can be delivered to users at any time and any place. At the heart of this convergence lies a delicate balance between centralization and decentralization. This paper explores the forces...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Real-Time Software Implementation of an IEEE 802.11a Baseband Receiver on Intel Multicore

    This paper presents a software-only implementation of an IEEE 802.11a (WiFi) receiver optimized for Intel multicore platforms. The receiver is about 50 times faster than a straightforward C implementation, i.e., an implementation that has the same functionality, but leaves optimization completely to the compiler. The hand-optimized implementation achieves real-time for...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Requirements for an Integrity-Protected Hypervisor on the X86 Hardware Virtualized Architecture

    Virtualization has been purported to be a panacea for many security problems. The authors analyze the feasibility of constructing an integrity-protected hypervisor on contemporary x86 hardware that includes virtualization support, observing that without the fundamental property of hypervisor integrity, no secrecy properties can be achieved. Unfortunately, they find that significant...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // May 2009

    New Product Diffusion Over A Social Network: The Case Of The iPhone

    In this paper the author study the diffusion of the iPhone over a period of several months after its launch. In particular, the author is interested in how adoption and diffusion processes are influenced by interactions between individuals. In other words, the author is interested in studying how the social...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Dec 2010

    A Taxonomy of Operational Cyber Security Risks

    This paper presents a taxonomy of operational cyber security risks that attempts to identify and organize the sources of operational cyber security risk into four classes: actions of people, systems and technology failures, failed internal processes, and external events. Each class is broken down into subclasses, which are described by...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University

  • White Papers // Jun 2010

    Best Practices for National Cyber Security: Building a National Computer Security Incident Management Capability

    Managing cyber security through a national strategy is a necessity common to all national governments in the 21st century. Critical infrastructure in most nations, from transportation and power generation to food supply and hospitals, depends on Information and Communications Technology (ICT). The reliance on complex and constantly evolving technology is...

    Provided By Carnegie Mellon University