Harvard Business School

Displaying 1-40 of 162 results

  • White Papers // Jul 2011

    Issuer Quality And The Credit Cycle

    The authors show that the credit quality of corporate debt issuers deteriorates during credit booms, and that this deterioration forecasts low excess returns to corporate bondholders. The key insight is that changes in the pricing of credit risk disproportionately affect the financing costs faced by low quality firms, so the...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Top Executive Background And Financial Reporting Choice: The Case Of Goodwill Impairment

    The authors study the role of executive functional background in explaining goodwill impairment choices. They focus on top executives (CEOs and CFOs) whose employment history includes experience in investment banking, auditing, or private equity/venture capital. On average, they find that former auditors are significantly more likely to impair goodwill. However,...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    When Power Makes Others Speechless: The Negative Impact Of Leader Power On Team Performance

    The authors examine the impact of subjective power on leadership behavior and demonstrate that the psychological effect of power on leaders spills over to impact team effectiveness. Specifically, drawing from the approach/inhibition theory of power, power-devaluation theory, and organizational research on the antecedents of employee voice, they argue that a...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Risky Trust: How Multi-Entity Teams Develop Trust In A High Risk Endeavor

    This paper explicates the challenge of risky trust, which the authors define as trust that exists between parties vulnerable to high economic, legal or reputational risks at individual or organizational levels. Drawing from analyses of data collected in a grounded case study of a multi-million dollar construction project, they identify...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Rational Preference For Smaller Menus: Variability In Menu-Setting Ability And 401(k) Plans

    The economic literature on choice focuses on individuals' decisions when faced with a given menu. However, the menu itself is often the result of pre-selection by a menu setter. The authors develop a model to study the relation between the ability of the menu setter and the size and quality...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Innovating At The World's Crossroads: How Multicultural Networks Promote Creativity

    This paper examines the effects of multicultural social networks on individuals' creative performance. Combining network analysis with experimental methods, two studies using different samples found that networks' degree of cultural heterogeneity positively predicts creativity on tasks that draw on varied cultural-knowledge resources but not on other tasks. The results also...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    How Do Incumbents Fare In The Face Of Increased Service Competition?

    The authors explore the conditions under which service competition leads to customer defection from an incumbent and which customers are most vulnerable to its effects. They find that customers defect at a higher rate from the incumbent following increased service competition only when the incumbent offers high quality service relative...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Delay As Agenda Setting

    In this paper the authors examine a class of dynamic decision-making processes that involve endogenous commitment. The analysis is relevant to group decision making settings as well as to hierarchical decision making settings in which, for example, subordinates attempt to influence their superiors. An inability to commit leads to the...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Platform Competition Under Asymmetric Information

    In the context of platform competition in a two-sided market, the authors study how uncertainty and asymmetric information concerning the success of a new technology affects the strategies of the platforms and the market outcome. They find that the incumbent dominates the market by setting the welfare-maximizing quantity when the...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Driven By Social Comparisons: How Feedback About Coworkers? Effort Influences Individual Productivity

    Drawing on theoretical insights from research on social comparison processes, this paper explores how managers can use performance feedback to sustain employees' motivation and performance in organizations. Using a field experiment at a Japanese bank, the authors investigate the effects of valence (positive versus negative), type (direct versus indirect), and...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    How Firm Strategies Influence The Architecture Of Transaction Networks

    In the paper of business ecosystems, hierarchy is an architectural property that refers to the degree to which transactions proceed in a single direction, from "Upstream" to "Downstream." It is often assumed that a unidirectional flow of goods in a value chain implies a corresponding hierarchy in the transaction networks...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Exploring The Duality Between Product And Organizational Architectures: A Test Of The "Mirroring" Hypothesis

    A variety of academic studies argue that a relationship exists between the structure of an organization and the design of the products that this organization produces. The authors explore this relationship in the software industry. The research takes advantage of a natural experiment, in that they observe products that fulfill...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Error's Lessons: The Importance Of Work Context In Organizational Learning From Error

    This paper examines the implications of work context for learning from errors in organizations. Prior research has shown that attitudes and behaviors related to error vary between groups within organizations, but has not investigated or theorized the ways in which differences in task and context influence how organizational groups best...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Leviathan As A Minority Shareholder: A Study Of Equity Purchases By The Brazilian National Development Bank (BNDES), 1995-2003

    There is a growing literature comparing the performance of private vs. state-owned companies. Yet, there is little work examining the effects of having the government as a minority shareholder of private companies. The authors conduct such a study using data for 296 publicly-traded corporations in Brazil, looking at the effects...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    What Makes The Bonding Stick? A Natural Experiment Involving The Supreme Court And Cross-Listed Firms

    Using a natural experiment to overcome the empirical challenges facing the debate over the bonding hypothesis, the authors analyze markets' reaction to a sudden radical change in the world of U.S.-listed foreign firms. They find no evidence that markets' reaction to this event related to the corporate governance and legal...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    The Role Of Organizational Scope And Governance In Strengthening Private Monitoring

    Governments and other organizations often outsource activities to achieve cost savings from market competition. Yet such benefits are often accompanied by poor quality resulting from moral hazard, which can be particularly onerous when outsourcing the monitoring and enforcement of government regulation. In this paper, they argue that the considerable moral...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    How Foundations Think: The Ford Foundation As A Dominating Institution In The Field Of American Business Schools

    In this paper there are two primary factors that can cause institutions to change. First, institutional entrepreneurs, including individual actors or small group of actors, are able to think and act outside the confines of their institutional context, and therefore, mobilize change in directions that favor new sets of interests....

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Measuring And Envisioning Risks: Boundary-Work In Risk Management

    This paper asks whether the expansion of measurement-based risk management in banking is as inevitable and as dangerous as Power and others speculate. Based on two detailed case studies and 53 additional interviews with risk management staff at five other major banks over 2001-2010, this paper shows that while the...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Naivete And Cynicism In Negotiations And Other Competitive Contexts

    A wealth of literature documents how the common failure to think about the decisions of others contributes to suboptimal outcomes. Yet sometimes, an excess of cynicism appears to lead us to over-think the actions of others and make negative attributions about their motivations without sufficient cause. In the process, we...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    The Dark Side Of Creativity: Original Thinkers Can Be More Dishonest

    Creativity is a common aspiration for individuals, organizations, and societies. Here, however, they test whether creativity increases dishonesty. The author proposes that a creative personality and creativity primes promote individuals' motivation to think outside the box and that this increased motivation leads to unethical behavior. Finally, a field study constructively...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    When Does A Platform Create Value By Limiting Choice?

    The author presents a theory for why it might be rational for a platform to limit the number of applications available on it. The model is based on the observation that even if users prefer application variety, applications often also exhibit direct network effects. The paper shows that the platform...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Sustainable Cities: Oxymoron Or The Shape Of The Future?

    Two trends are likely to define the 21st century: threats to the sustainability of the natural environment and dramatic increases in urbanization. This paper reviews the goals, business models, and partnerships involved in eight early "Ecocity" projects to begin to identify success factors in this emerging industry. Ecocities, for the...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Multinational Firms, Labor Market Discrimination, And The Capture Of Competitive Advantage By Exploiting The Social Divide

    The organizational theory of the multinational firm holds that foreignness is a liability, and specifically that lack of embeddedness in host-country social networks is a source of competitive disadvantage; meanwhile the literature on labor market discrimination suggests that exploiting the bigotry of others can be a source of competitive advantage....

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Do US Market Interactions Affect CEO Pay? Evidence From UK Companies

    This paper examines the extent that interactions with US markets impact the compensation practices of non-US firms. Using a sample of large UK companies, the authors find that the total compensation of UK CEOs is positively related to the extent of the firm's interactions with US markets, as captured by...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Turning Waste Into By-Product

    This paper studies how a firm can create and capture value by converting a waste stream into a useful and saleable by-product. The authors show that BPS creates an operational synergy between two products that are jointly produced. In essence, BPS is a process innovation that reduces the marginal cost...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    A Darker Side To Decentralized Banks: Market Power And Credit Rationing In SME Lending

    The authors use loan-level data to study how the organizational structure of banks impacts small business lending. They find that decentralized banks - where branch managers have greater autonomy over lending decisions - give larger loans to small firms and those with "Soft information". However, decentralized banks are also more...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Dec 2010

    Using What We Know: Turning Organizational Knowledge Into Team Performance

    This paper examines how teams draw on knowledge resources in the firm in the production of novel output. The author theorize positive effects of team use of an organizational knowledge repository on two measures of team performance (quality and efficiency), and argue that these effects will be greater when teams...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Dec 2010

    To Groupon Or Not To Groupon: The Profitability Of Deep Discounts

    The author examines the profitability and implications of online discount vouchers, a new marketing tool that offers consumers large discounts when they prepay for participating merchants' goods and services. Within a model of repeat experience good purchase, they examine two mechanisms by which a discount voucher service can benefit affiliated...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Dec 2010

    A Brief Postwar History Of US Consumer Finance

    This paper describes the consumer finance sector in the US since World War II. The authors define the sector in terms of the functions delivered by firms. They provide time series evidence on major trends in consumption, savings, and borrowing. Examining consumer decisions, changes in regulation, and business practices, they...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Dec 2010

    Dividends As Reference Points: A Behavioral Signaling Model

    The authors propose a model in which investors are loss averse relative to a reference point set with prior dividends. Managers with strong earnings separate themselves by increasing dividends and yet still retaining enough slack to clear a higher reference point in the next period, with high probability. The model...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    Does Diversification Create Value In The Presence Of External Financing Constraints? Evidence From The 2007?2009 Financial Crisis

    The author shows that the value of corporate diversification increased during the 2007 - 2009 financial crises. Diversification gave firms both financing and investment advantages. First, conglomerates became significantly more leveraged relative to comparable focused firms. Second, conglomerates' access to internal capital markets became more valuable not just because external...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    Sponsored Links Or "Advertisements"?: Measuring Labeling Alternatives In Internet Search Engines

    Search engines combine two kinds of links: So-called "Algorithmic" links present the results a search engine deems most relevant for a given search phrase, selected based on page contents, keywords, links, and other factors. So-called "Sponsored" links give the results a search engine is paid to show, selected based on...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    Regulating For Legitimacy: Consumer Credit Access In France And America

    Theories of legitimate regulation have emphasized the role of governments either in fixing market failures to promote greater efficiency, or in restricting the efficient functioning of markets in order to pursue public welfare goals. In either case, features of markets serve to justify regulatory intervention. For certain areas of regulation,...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    Modularity For Value Appropriation - How To Draw The Boundaries Of Intellectual Property

    The existing theory of modularity explains how modular designs create value. The author extends the theory to address value appropriation. A product or process design that is modular with respect to intellectual property (IP) allows firms to better capture value in situations where knowledge and value creation are distributed across...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    The Learning Effects Of Monitoring

    This paper investigates the relationship between monitoring, decision-making, and learning among lower level employees. The author exploits a field-research setting in which business units vary in the "Tightness" with which they monitor employee decisions. They find that tighter monitoring gives rise to implicit incentives in the form of sharp increases...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    Does Shareholder Proxy Access Improve Firm Value? Evidence From The Business Roundtable Challenge

    The author measures the value of shareholder proxy access by using a recent development in the ability of shareholders to nominate candidates for board seats. They use the SEC's October 4, 2010 announcement that it would significantly delay implementation of its August 2010 proxy access rule as a natural experiment....

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    Institutional Pressures And Organizational Characteristics: Implications For Environmental Strategy

    A broad literature has emerged over the past decades demonstrating that firms' environmental strategies and practices are influenced by stakeholders and institutional pressures. Such findings are consistent with institutional sociology, which emphasizes the importance of regulatory, normative and cognitive factors in shaping firms' decisions to adopt specific organizational practices, above...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    The Influence Of Prior Industry Affiliation On Framing In Nascent Industries: The Evolution Of Digital Cameras

    New industries sparked by technological change are characterized by high uncertainty. In this paper the author explores how a firm's conceptualization of products in this context, as reflected by product feature choices, is influenced by prior industry affiliation. They study digital cameras introduced from 1991-2006 by firms from three prior...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Nov 2010

    Beyond The Deal: Wage A "Negotiation Campaign"

    In contrast to the sweeping spectrum of this story, the "Unit of analysis" that negotiation scholars primarily examine is the individual deal. With this focus, they analyze the process by which parties interact, their deeper interests, their communication patterns, possible agreements, and other factors that may influence the outcome of...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Oct 2010

    Reversing The Null: Regulation, Deregulation, And The Power Of Ideas

    It has been said that deregulation was an important source of the recent financial crisis. It may be more accurate, however, to say that a deregulatory mindset was an important source of the crisis - a mindset that, to a very significant extent, grew out of profound changes in academic...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Platform Competition Under Asymmetric Information

    In the context of platform competition in a two-sided market, the authors study how uncertainty and asymmetric information concerning the success of a new technology affects the strategies of the platforms and the market outcome. They find that the incumbent dominates the market by setting the welfare-maximizing quantity when the...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Delay As Agenda Setting

    In this paper the authors examine a class of dynamic decision-making processes that involve endogenous commitment. The analysis is relevant to group decision making settings as well as to hierarchical decision making settings in which, for example, subordinates attempt to influence their superiors. An inability to commit leads to the...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    How Do Incumbents Fare In The Face Of Increased Service Competition?

    The authors explore the conditions under which service competition leads to customer defection from an incumbent and which customers are most vulnerable to its effects. They find that customers defect at a higher rate from the incumbent following increased service competition only when the incumbent offers high quality service relative...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Innovating At The World's Crossroads: How Multicultural Networks Promote Creativity

    This paper examines the effects of multicultural social networks on individuals' creative performance. Combining network analysis with experimental methods, two studies using different samples found that networks' degree of cultural heterogeneity positively predicts creativity on tasks that draw on varied cultural-knowledge resources but not on other tasks. The results also...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Rational Preference For Smaller Menus: Variability In Menu-Setting Ability And 401(k) Plans

    The economic literature on choice focuses on individuals' decisions when faced with a given menu. However, the menu itself is often the result of pre-selection by a menu setter. The authors develop a model to study the relation between the ability of the menu setter and the size and quality...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    When Power Makes Others Speechless: The Negative Impact Of Leader Power On Team Performance

    The authors examine the impact of subjective power on leadership behavior and demonstrate that the psychological effect of power on leaders spills over to impact team effectiveness. Specifically, drawing from the approach/inhibition theory of power, power-devaluation theory, and organizational research on the antecedents of employee voice, they argue that a...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Top Executive Background And Financial Reporting Choice: The Case Of Goodwill Impairment

    The authors study the role of executive functional background in explaining goodwill impairment choices. They focus on top executives (CEOs and CFOs) whose employment history includes experience in investment banking, auditing, or private equity/venture capital. On average, they find that former auditors are significantly more likely to impair goodwill. However,...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Risky Trust: How Multi-Entity Teams Develop Trust In A High Risk Endeavor

    This paper explicates the challenge of risky trust, which the authors define as trust that exists between parties vulnerable to high economic, legal or reputational risks at individual or organizational levels. Drawing from analyses of data collected in a grounded case study of a multi-million dollar construction project, they identify...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    Platform Competition, Compatibility, And Social Efficiency

    The authors study systems compatibility in settings with one-sided plat-forms and direct network effects. They consider systems compatibility in settings with two-sided platforms and indirect network effects to develop an explanation why markets with two-sided platforms are often characterized by incompatibility with one dominant player who may subsidize access to...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Oct 2008

    Platform Rules: Multi-Sided Platforms As Regulators

    This paper provides a basic conceptual framework for interpreting non-price instruments used by multi-sided platforms (MSPs) by analogizing MSPs as "Private regulators" who regulate access to and interactions around the platform. The authors present evidence on Facebook, TopCoder, Roppongi Hills and Harvard Business School to document the "Regulatory" role played...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Aug 2009

    Just Keep My Money! Supporting Tax-time Savings With US Savings Bonds

    This paper focuses the results of a 2007 experiment testing if specific process simplification can foster increased take-up rates for savings products, particularly by low-to-moderate income (LMI) households. Tax refund recipients at certain H&R Block tax preparation offices were given the option to purchase U.S. Savings Bonds with their tax...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    The Global Networks Of Multinational Firms

    The proliferation of multinational activities has led to the emergence of new industrial clusters around the world. In this paper, the authors examine how "First nature" location fundamentals and "Second nature" agglomeration economies jointly determine the global landscape of multinational firms. Using a unique worldwide plant dataset that reports detailed...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Global, Local, And Contagious Investor Sentiment

    The authors construct indexes of investor sentiment for six major stock markets and decompose them into one global and six local indexes. Relative market sentiment is correlated with the relative prices of dual-listed companies, validating the indexes. Both global and local sentiment is contrarian predictors of the time series of...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    A Darker Side To Decentralized Banks: Market Power And Credit Rationing In SME Lending

    The authors use loan-level data to study how the organizational structure of banks impacts small business lending. They find that decentralized banks - where branch managers have greater autonomy over lending decisions - give larger loans to small firms and those with "Soft information". However, decentralized banks are also more...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Oct 2010

    Coming Clean And Cleaning Up: Does Voluntary Self- Reporting Indicate Effective Self-Policing?

    Administrative agencies are increasingly establishing voluntary self-reporting programs both as an investigative tool and to encourage regulated firms to commit to policing themselves. The authors investigate whether self-reporting can reliably indicate effective self-policing efforts that might provide opportunities for enforcement efficiencies. They find that regulators used self-reports of legal violations...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Mar 2008

    Modeling Expert Opinions On Food Healthiness: A Nutrition Metric

    Research over the last several decades indicates the failure of existing nutritional labels to substantially improve the healthiness of consumers' food and beverage choices. The obstacle for policy-makers is to encapsulate a wide body of scientific knowledge into a labeling scheme that is also comprehensible to the average shopper. Here,...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    An Investigation Of Earnings Management Through Marketing Actions

    Prior research hypothesizes managers use 'real actions' including the reduction of discretionary expenditures, to manage earnings to meet or beat key benchmarks. This paper examines this hypothesis by testing how different types of marketing expenditures are used to boost earnings for a durable commodity consumer product which can be easily...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Leviathan As A Minority Shareholder: A Study Of Equity Purchases By The Brazilian National Development Bank (BNDES), 1995-2003

    There is a growing literature comparing the performance of private vs. state-owned companies. Yet, there is little work examining the effects of having the government as a minority shareholder of private companies. The authors conduct such a study using data for 296 publicly-traded corporations in Brazil, looking at the effects...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    What Makes The Bonding Stick? A Natural Experiment Involving The Supreme Court And Cross-Listed Firms

    Using a natural experiment to overcome the empirical challenges facing the debate over the bonding hypothesis, the authors analyze markets' reaction to a sudden radical change in the world of U.S.-listed foreign firms. They find no evidence that markets' reaction to this event related to the corporate governance and legal...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Error's Lessons: The Importance Of Work Context In Organizational Learning From Error

    This paper examines the implications of work context for learning from errors in organizations. Prior research has shown that attitudes and behaviors related to error vary between groups within organizations, but has not investigated or theorized the ways in which differences in task and context influence how organizational groups best...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Victorian Pioneers Of Corporate Sustainability

    Historical scholarship on business - environment interactions has largely sidestepped the study of corporate innovations that had both economic and environmental benefits. This issue is examined through late-nineteenth-century initiatives sponsored by the British Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, whose aim was to document and promote the...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Labor Regulations And European Private Equity

    European nations substitute between employment protection regulations and labor market expenditures for providing worker insurance. Employment regulations more directly tax firms making frequent labor adjustments than other labor insurance mechanisms. Venture capital and private equity investors are especially sensitive to these labor adjustment costs. Nations favoring labor expenditures as the...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Workplace Peers And Entrepreneurship

    The authors examine whether the likelihood of entrepreneurial activity is related to the prior career experiences of an individual's co-workers, using a unique matched employer-employee panel dataset. They find that an individual is more likely to become an entrepreneur if his or her co-workers have been entrepreneurs before. Peer influences...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    The Birth Of Joint-Stock Banking: England And New England Compared

    By the end of the nineteenth century, the banking systems of England and New England were very different. England possessed a small number of large-scale clearing banks that had established extensive branch networks and dominated the domestic market. In contrast, New England banking was characterized by a large number of...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Major Trends In The Historiography Of The Latin American Oil Industry

    The historiography of Latin America's oil industry has evolved since the period between the 1960s and the 1980s, when most scholars were focusing on the rise of nationalism in reaction to the multinationals' control of the oil sector. Beginning in the 1990s, the emergence of new methodologies enabled historians to...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Entrepreneurship And Capabilities In A "Beginner" Oil Multinational: The Case Of ENI

    The authors laid the groundwork for the company's growth during the 1950s and 1960s. Group of knowledgeable specialists, who were equipped with a complex set of capabilities that enabled them to oversee and perform operational tasks. The task of adapting that set of capabilities began in the latter half of...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Royal Dutch Shell: Company Strategies For Dealing With Environmental Issues

    The intricate interplay among environmental pressure groups, oil companies, and governments is revealed from the perspective of the Anglo-Dutch company Royal Dutch Shell. An examination of three environmental issues demonstrates the company's awareness of such problems and describes its efforts to contain potential damage to the degree permitted by existing...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Exploring The Duality Between Product And Organizational Architectures: A Test Of The "Mirroring" Hypothesis

    A variety of academic studies argue that a relationship exists between the structure of an organization and the design of the products that this organization produces. The authors explore this relationship in the software industry. The research takes advantage of a natural experiment, in that they observe products that fulfill...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Sep 2008

    Mental Accounting And Small Windfalls: Evidence From An Online Grocer

    The authors study the effect of small windfalls on consumer spending decisions by comparing the purchases online grocery customers make when redeeming $10-off coupons with the purchases they make without coupons. Controlling for customer fixed effects and other variables; they find that grocery spending increases by $1.59 when a $10-off...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Platform Envelopment

    Due to network effects and switching costs in platform markets, entrants generally must offer revolutionary functionality. The authors explore a second entry path that does not rely upon Schumpeterian innovation: platform envelopment. Through envelopment, a provider in one platform market can enter another platform market, combining its own functionality with...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Turning Waste Into By-Product

    This paper studies how a firm can create and capture value by converting a waste stream into a useful and saleable by-product. The authors show that BPS creates an operational synergy between two products that are jointly produced. In essence, BPS is a process innovation that reduces the marginal cost...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // May 2009

    It Is Okay For Artists To Make Money. No, Really, It's Okay

    In this paper, the authors examine the apparent conflict between artistic and commercial objectives within creative companies, taking as the point of departure a particularly energetic debate during a symposium at the 2007 Academy of Management meetings. They surface the assumptions that underlie such debates, compare them with findings from...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    Fluid Tasks And Fluid Teams: The Impact Of Diversity In Experience And Team Familiarity On Team Performance

    In this paper, the authors consider how the structures of tasks and teams interact to affect team performance. They study the effects of diversity in experience on a team's ability to respond to task changes, by separately examining interpersonal team diversity and intrapersonal team diversity. They also examine whether team...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Oct 2010

    Prices Or Knowledge? What Drives Demand For Financial Services In Emerging Markets?

    Financial development is critical for growth, but its micro-determinants are not well understood. The authors test leading theories of low demand for financial services in emerging markets, combining novel survey evidence from Indonesia and India with a field experiment. They find a strong correlation between financial literacy and behavior. However,...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Capitalizing On Innovation: The Case Of Japan

    Japan's industrial landscape is characterized by hierarchical forms of industry organization, which are increasingly inadequate in modern sectors, where innovation relies on platforms and horizontal ecosystems of firms producing complementary products. Using three case studies - software, animation and mobile telephony -, they illustrate two key sources of inefficiencies that...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // May 2010

    Taking A "Deep Div"?: What Only A Top Leader Can Do

    Unlike most historical accounts of strategic change inside large firms, empirical research on strategic management rarely uses the day-to-day behaviors of top executives as the unit of analysis. By examining the resource allocation process closely, they introduce the concept of a deep dive, an intervention when top management seizes hold...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Oct 2010

    Mixed Source

    The authors study competitive interaction between a profit-maximizing firm that sells software and complementary services and a free open source competitor. They examine the firm's choice of business model between the proprietary model, the open source model, and the mixed source model. When a module is opened, users can access...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Breakthrough Inventions And Migrating Clusters Of Innovation

    The authors investigate the speed at which clusters of invention for a technology migrate spatially following breakthrough inventions. They identify breakthrough inventions as the top one percent of US inventions for a technology during 1975-1984 in terms of subsequent citations. Patenting growth is significantly higher in cities and technologies where...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Clusters Of Entrepreneurship

    Employment growth is strongly predicted by smaller average establishment size, both across cities and across industries within cities, but there is little consensus on why this relationship exists. Traditional economic explanations emphasize factors that reduce entry costs or raise entrepreneurial returns, thereby increasing net returns and attracting entrepreneurs. A second...

    Provided By Harvard Business School

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    I Read Playboy For The Articles: Justifying And Rationalizing Questionable Preferences

    Humans are masters of lying and self-deception. The authors want others to believe good, fair, responsible and logical, and they place just as much importance on thinking of this way. Therefore, when people behave in ways that might appear selfish, prejudiced or perverted, they engage a host of strategies designed...

    Provided By Harvard Business School