Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

Displaying 1-18 of 18 results

  • White Papers // Jul 2013

    Verifiable Delegation of Computation on Outsourced Data

    The authors address the problem in which a client stores a large amount of data with an untrusted server in such a way that, at any moment, the client can ask the server to compute a function on some portion of its outsourced data. In this paper, the client must...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Apr 2013

    A Note on Blocking Optimality in Distributed Real-Time Locking Protocols

    Lower and upper bounds on maximum priority inversion blocking (pi-blocking) are established under distributed multiprocessor real-time semaphore protocols (where resources may be accessed only from specific synchronization processors). Prior work on shared-memory multiprocessor semaphore protocols (which require resources to be accessible from potentially any processor) has established bounds of (m)...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Dec 2012

    Virtually Exclusive Resources

    Independence preservation, a desirable property in real-time locking protocols that isolates tasks from delays due to unrelated critical sections, is formalized. It is shown that independence preservation is impossible if temporary job migrations are disallowed. The OMIP, a new, asymptotically optimal, independence-preserving locking protocol for clustered scheduling based on migratory...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Oct 2012

    Improved Analysis and Evaluation of Real-Time Semaphore Protocols for P-FP Scheduling

    Several suspension-based multiprocessor real-time locking protocols for Partitioned Fixed-Priority (P-FP) scheduling have been proposed in prior work. These protocols differ in key design choices that affect implementation complexity, overheads, and worst-case blocking, and it is not obvious which is "Best" when implemented in a real OS. In particular, should blocked...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Sep 2012

    The Case for Migratory Priority Inheritance in Linux: Bounded Priority Inversions on Multiprocessors

    The Linux's real-time performance crucially depends on the priority inheritance because - on uniprocessors - it limits the maximum duration of priority inversion to one critical section per lock while ensuring that tasks remain fully preemptable even when holding locks. Unfortunately, priority inheritance is ineffective on the multiprocessors under non-global...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Sep 2012

    Making Geo-Replicated Systems Fast as Possible, Consistent When Necessary

    Online services distribute and replicate state across geographically diverse data centers and direct user requests to the closest or least loaded site. While effectively ensuring low latency responses, this approach is at odds with maintaining cross-site consistency. The authors make three contributions to address this tension; they propose RedBlue consistency,...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Jul 2012

    Distributed Key Generation in the Wild

    Distributed Key Generation (DKG) has been studied extensively in the cryptographic literature. However, it has never been examined outside of the synchronous setting, and the known DKG protocols cannot guarantee safety or liveness over the Internet. In this paper, the authors present the first realistic DKG protocol for use over...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Orchestrating the Deployment of Computations in the Cloud With Conductor

    When organizations move computation to the cloud, they must choose from a myriad of cloud services that can be used to outsource these jobs. The impact of this choice on price and performance is unclear, even for technical users. To further complicate this choice, factors like price fluctuations due to...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    The Transitive Composability of Relation Transition Systems

    Relation Transition Systems (RTSs) have recently been proposed as a foundation for reasoning effectively about program equivalence in higher-order imperative languages like ML. RTSs fruitfully synthesize the co-inductive style of bisimulation-based methods with the treatment of local state in recent work on Step-indexed Kripke Logical Relations (SKLRs). Like SKLRs, RTSs...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    Separation Logic in the Presence of Garbage Collection

    Separation logic has proven to be a highly effective tool for the verification of heap-manipulating programs. However, it has been applied almost exclusively in language settings where either memory is managed manually or the issue of memory management is ignored altogether. In this paper, the authors present a variant of...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // May 2010

    An Overview of Interrupt Accounting Techniques for Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems

    The importance of accounting for interrupts in multiprocessor real-time schedulability analysis is discussed and three interrupt accounting methods, namely quantum-centric, task-centric, and processor-centric accounting, are analyzed and contrasted. Additionally, two special cases, dedicated interrupt handling (i.e., all interrupts are processed by one processor) and timer multiplexing (i.e., all jobs are...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Flow Splitting With Fate Sharing in a Next Generation Transport Services Architecture

    The challenges of optimizing end-to-end performance over diverse Internet paths has driven widespread adoption of in-path optimizers, which can destructively interfere with TCP's end-to-end semantics and with each other, and are incompatible with end-to-end IPsec. The authors identify the architectural cause of these conflicts and resolve them in Tng, an...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    A Case for the Accountable Cloud

    For many companies, clouds are becoming an interesting alternative to a dedicated IT infrastructure. However, cloud computing also carries certain risks for both the customer and the cloud provider. The customer places his computation and data on machines he cannot directly control; the provider agrees to run a service whose...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // May 2009

    Towards Trusted Cloud Computing

    Cloud computing infrastructures enable companies to cut costs by outsourcing computations on-demand. However, clients of cloud computing services currently have no means of verifying the confidentiality and integrity of their data and computation. To address this problem one proposes the design of a trusted cloud computing platform (TCCP). TCCP enables...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // May 2009

    Subsumer-First: Steering Symbolic Reachability Analysis

    Symbolic reachability analysis provides a basis for the verification of software systems by offering algorithmic support for the exploration of the program state space when searching for proofs or counterexamples. The choice of exploration strategy employed by the analysis has direct impact on its success, whereas the ability to find...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    Cardinality Abstraction for Declarative Networking Applications

    Declarative Networking is a recent, viable approach to make distributed programming easier, which is becoming increasingly popular in systems and networking community. It offers the programmer a declarative, rule-based language, called P2, for writing distributed applications in an abstract, yet expressive way. This approach, however, imposes new challenges on analysis...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    Operational Semantics for Declarative Networking

    Declarative Networking has been recently promoted as a high-level programming paradigm to more conveniently describe and implement systems that run in a distributed fashion over a computer network. It has already been used to implement various networked systems, e.g., network overlays, Byzantine fault tolerance protocols, and distributed hash tables. Declarative...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Sep 2008

    Pretty Good Packet Authentication

    Internet offenders have been constantly indulging in illegal and malicious online activities under disguise that either remain untraceable or are traced to the source address of innocent internet users. This paper introduces one to Pretty Good Packet Authentication (PGPA), a simple service that can establish whether or not a given...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Sep 2012

    The Case for Migratory Priority Inheritance in Linux: Bounded Priority Inversions on Multiprocessors

    The Linux's real-time performance crucially depends on the priority inheritance because - on uniprocessors - it limits the maximum duration of priority inversion to one critical section per lock while ensuring that tasks remain fully preemptable even when holding locks. Unfortunately, priority inheritance is ineffective on the multiprocessors under non-global...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Apr 2013

    A Note on Blocking Optimality in Distributed Real-Time Locking Protocols

    Lower and upper bounds on maximum priority inversion blocking (pi-blocking) are established under distributed multiprocessor real-time semaphore protocols (where resources may be accessed only from specific synchronization processors). Prior work on shared-memory multiprocessor semaphore protocols (which require resources to be accessible from potentially any processor) has established bounds of (m)...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Oct 2012

    Improved Analysis and Evaluation of Real-Time Semaphore Protocols for P-FP Scheduling

    Several suspension-based multiprocessor real-time locking protocols for Partitioned Fixed-Priority (P-FP) scheduling have been proposed in prior work. These protocols differ in key design choices that affect implementation complexity, overheads, and worst-case blocking, and it is not obvious which is "Best" when implemented in a real OS. In particular, should blocked...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // May 2010

    An Overview of Interrupt Accounting Techniques for Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems

    The importance of accounting for interrupts in multiprocessor real-time schedulability analysis is discussed and three interrupt accounting methods, namely quantum-centric, task-centric, and processor-centric accounting, are analyzed and contrasted. Additionally, two special cases, dedicated interrupt handling (i.e., all interrupts are processed by one processor) and timer multiplexing (i.e., all jobs are...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Dec 2012

    Virtually Exclusive Resources

    Independence preservation, a desirable property in real-time locking protocols that isolates tasks from delays due to unrelated critical sections, is formalized. It is shown that independence preservation is impossible if temporary job migrations are disallowed. The OMIP, a new, asymptotically optimal, independence-preserving locking protocol for clustered scheduling based on migratory...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Orchestrating the Deployment of Computations in the Cloud With Conductor

    When organizations move computation to the cloud, they must choose from a myriad of cloud services that can be used to outsource these jobs. The impact of this choice on price and performance is unclear, even for technical users. To further complicate this choice, factors like price fluctuations due to...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Jul 2013

    Verifiable Delegation of Computation on Outsourced Data

    The authors address the problem in which a client stores a large amount of data with an untrusted server in such a way that, at any moment, the client can ask the server to compute a function on some portion of its outsourced data. In this paper, the client must...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // May 2009

    Towards Trusted Cloud Computing

    Cloud computing infrastructures enable companies to cut costs by outsourcing computations on-demand. However, clients of cloud computing services currently have no means of verifying the confidentiality and integrity of their data and computation. To address this problem one proposes the design of a trusted cloud computing platform (TCCP). TCCP enables...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    A Case for the Accountable Cloud

    For many companies, clouds are becoming an interesting alternative to a dedicated IT infrastructure. However, cloud computing also carries certain risks for both the customer and the cloud provider. The customer places his computation and data on machines he cannot directly control; the provider agrees to run a service whose...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Sep 2008

    Pretty Good Packet Authentication

    Internet offenders have been constantly indulging in illegal and malicious online activities under disguise that either remain untraceable or are traced to the source address of innocent internet users. This paper introduces one to Pretty Good Packet Authentication (PGPA), a simple service that can establish whether or not a given...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Flow Splitting With Fate Sharing in a Next Generation Transport Services Architecture

    The challenges of optimizing end-to-end performance over diverse Internet paths has driven widespread adoption of in-path optimizers, which can destructively interfere with TCP's end-to-end semantics and with each other, and are incompatible with end-to-end IPsec. The authors identify the architectural cause of these conflicts and resolve them in Tng, an...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // May 2009

    Subsumer-First: Steering Symbolic Reachability Analysis

    Symbolic reachability analysis provides a basis for the verification of software systems by offering algorithmic support for the exploration of the program state space when searching for proofs or counterexamples. The choice of exploration strategy employed by the analysis has direct impact on its success, whereas the ability to find...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Sep 2012

    Making Geo-Replicated Systems Fast as Possible, Consistent When Necessary

    Online services distribute and replicate state across geographically diverse data centers and direct user requests to the closest or least loaded site. While effectively ensuring low latency responses, this approach is at odds with maintaining cross-site consistency. The authors make three contributions to address this tension; they propose RedBlue consistency,...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Jul 2012

    Distributed Key Generation in the Wild

    Distributed Key Generation (DKG) has been studied extensively in the cryptographic literature. However, it has never been examined outside of the synchronous setting, and the known DKG protocols cannot guarantee safety or liveness over the Internet. In this paper, the authors present the first realistic DKG protocol for use over...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    Cardinality Abstraction for Declarative Networking Applications

    Declarative Networking is a recent, viable approach to make distributed programming easier, which is becoming increasingly popular in systems and networking community. It offers the programmer a declarative, rule-based language, called P2, for writing distributed applications in an abstract, yet expressive way. This approach, however, imposes new challenges on analysis...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    Operational Semantics for Declarative Networking

    Declarative Networking has been recently promoted as a high-level programming paradigm to more conveniently describe and implement systems that run in a distributed fashion over a computer network. It has already been used to implement various networked systems, e.g., network overlays, Byzantine fault tolerance protocols, and distributed hash tables. Declarative...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    The Transitive Composability of Relation Transition Systems

    Relation Transition Systems (RTSs) have recently been proposed as a foundation for reasoning effectively about program equivalence in higher-order imperative languages like ML. RTSs fruitfully synthesize the co-inductive style of bisimulation-based methods with the treatment of local state in recent work on Step-indexed Kripke Logical Relations (SKLRs). Like SKLRs, RTSs...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    Separation Logic in the Presence of Garbage Collection

    Separation logic has proven to be a highly effective tool for the verification of heap-manipulating programs. However, it has been applied almost exclusively in language settings where either memory is managed manually or the issue of memory management is ignored altogether. In this paper, the authors present a variant of...

    Provided By Max Planck Institute for Software Systems