Princeton University

Displaying 1-40 of 206 results

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Serval: An End-Host Stack for Service-Centric Networking

    Internet services run on multiple servers in different locations, serving clients that are often mobile and multi-homed. This does not match well with today's network stack, designed for communication between fixed hosts with topology-dependent addresses. As a result, online service providers resort to clumsy and management intensive work-arounds - forfeiting...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    An Analytical Approach to the Adoption of Asymmetric Bidirectional Firewalls: Need for Regulation?

    Recent incidents of cyber-security violations have revealed the importance of having firewalls and other intrusion detection systems to monitor traffic entering and leaving access networks. But the adoption of such security measures is often stymied by 'Free-riding' effects and 'Shortsightedness' among Internet Service Providers (ISPs). In this paper, the authors...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Feb 2012

    Network Formation Games Among Relay Stations in Next Generation Wireless Networks

    The introduction of Relay Station (RS) nodes is a key feature in next generation wireless networks such as 3GPP's Long Term Evolution Advanced (LTE-Advanced), or the forthcoming IEEE 802.16j WiMAX standard. This paper presents, using game theory, a novel approach for the formation of the tree architecture that connects the...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Commensal Cuckoo: Secure Group Partitioning for Large-Scale Services

    The authors present commensal cuckoo, a secure group partitioning scheme for large-scale systems that maintains the correctness of many small groups, despite a Byzantine adversary that controls a constant (global) fraction of all nodes. In particular, the adversary is allowed to repeatedly rejoin faulty nodes to the system in an...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    ILC: A Foundation for Automated Reasoning About Pointer Programs

    This paper shows how to use Girard's intuitionistic linear logic extended with a classical sublogic to reason about pointer programs. More specifically, first, the paper defines the proof theory for ILC (Intuitionistic Linear logic with Constraints) and shows it is well-defined via a proof of cut elimination. Second, inspired by...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    A Distributed Sorting Framework for Ad Hoc Wireless Sensor Networks

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are distributed, self-organizing, pervasive systems, which perform collaborative computations to provide useful information about the underlying stochastic phenomenon. In this paper, the authors explore the ranking and sorting problems in distributed sensor networks which provide perspectives in understanding certain fundamental issues in WSN, as well as...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Dec 2011

    Multi-Resource Allocation: Fairness-Efficiency Tradeoffs in a Unifying Framework

    Quantifying the notion of fairness is under-explored when users request different ratios of multiple distinct resource types. A typical example is datacenters processing jobs with heterogeneous resource requirements on CPU, memory, etc. A generalization of max-min fairness to multiple resources was recently proposed in, but may suffer from significant loss...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Dec 2011

    Language Abstractions for Software-Defined Networks

    For the past 30 years, networks have been built the same way: out of special-purpose devices running distributed algorithms that provide functionality such as topology discovery, routing, traffic monitoring, and access control. Recent years, however, have seen growing interest in a new kind of network architecture in which a logically-centralized...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Nov 2011

    LearnPADS++ Incremental Inference of Ad Hoc Data Formats

    An ad hoc data source is any semi-structured, non-standard data source. The format of such data sources is often evolving and frequently lacking documentation. Consequently, off-the-shelf tools for processing such data often do not exist, forcing analysts to develop their own tools, a costly and time-consuming process. In this paper,...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Oct 2011

    Pricing by Timing: Innovating Broadband Data Plans

    Wireless Internet data usage is doubling every year. Users are consuming more of high-bandwidth data applications, with usage concentrated on several peak hours in a day. The authors review many of the pricing schemes in practice today and analyze why they do not solve this problem of growing data traffic....

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    The Diversity-Multiplexing-Delay Tradeoff in MIMO Multihop Networks With ARQ

    The authors study the tradeoff between reliability, data rate, and delay for half-duplex MIMO multi-hop networks that utilize the Automatic-Retransmission-reQuest (ARQ) protocol both in the asymptotic high Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) regime and in the finite SNR regime. They propose novel ARQ protocol designs that optimize these tradeoffs. In particular, they...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Fair Greening of Broadband Access: Spectrum Management for Energy-Efficient DSL Networks

    Dynamic Spectrum Management (DSM) is recognized as a promising technology to reduce power consumption in DSL access networks. However, the correct formulation of power-aware DSM problem statements requires a proper understanding of greening, i.e., reducing power consumption. In this paper, the authors therefore investigate greening and show that it can...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Toward a Lightweight Model of BGP Safety

    For the past ten years, researchers have used the Stable Paths Problem (SPP) to analyze the stability properties of the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP). Analysis of SPP has revealed several combinations of topologies and routing configurations (or gadgets) where BGP cannot converge to a unique stable solution. Researchers typically analyze...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Commensal Cuckoo: Secure Group Partitioning for LargeScale Services

    The authors present commensal cuckoo, a secure group partitioning scheme for large-scale systems that maintains the correctness of many small groups, despite a Byzantine adversary that controls a constant (global) fraction of all nodes. In particular, the adversary is allowed to repeatedly rejoin faulty nodes to the system in an...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    ARIADNE: Agnostic Reconfiguration in a Disconnected Network Environment

    Extreme transistor technology scaling is causing increasing concerns in device reliability: the expected lifetime of individual transistors in complex chips is quickly decreasing, and the problem is expected to worsen at future technology nodes. With complex designs increasingly relying on Networks-on-Chip (NoCs) for on-chip data transfers, a NoC must continue...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jul 2011

    Hiding Amongst the Clouds: A Proposal for Cloud-Based Onion Routing

    Internet censorship and surveillance have made anonymity tools increasingly critical for free and open Internet access. Tor, and its associated ecosystem of volunteer traffic relays, provides one of the most secure and widely-available means for achieving Internet anonymity today. Unfortunately, Tor has limitations, including poor performance, inadequate capacity, and a...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    Coercing Clients Into Facilitating Failover for Object Delivery

    Application-level protocols used for object delivery, such as HTTP, are built atop TCP/IP and inherit its host-to-host abstraction. Given that these services are replicated for scalability, this unnecessarily exposes failures of individual servers to their clients. While changes to both client and server applications can be used to mask such...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Levels of Awareness: Design Considerations for Web Crawlers and Censorware Detection

    Search engines are tremendous force-multipliers for end-hosts trying to discover content on the Web. As the amount of content online grows, so does dependence on web crawlers to discover content. The desire for adversaries to censor search engines from detecting content on the Internet has scaled accordingly. Web crawlers, programs...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    Identifying Performance Bottlenecks in CDNs Through TCP-Level Monitoring

    Content Distribution Networks (CDNs) need to make decisions, such as server selection and routing, to improve performance for their clients. The performance may be limited by various factors such as packet loss in the network, a small receive buffer at the client, or constrained server CPU and disk resources. Conventional...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    A List-Machine Benchmark for Mechanized Metatheory

    The authors propose a benchmark to compare theorem-proving systems on their ability to express proofs of compiler correctness. In contrast to the first POPL-mark, they emphasize the connection of proofs to compiler implementations, and they point out that much can be done without binders or alpha-conversion. They propose specific criteria...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    Modular Protections Against Non-Control Data Attacks

    This paper introduces YARRA, a conservative extension to C to protect applications from non-control data attacks. YARRA programmers specify their data integrity requirements by declaring critical data types and ascribing these critical types to important data structures. YARRA guarantees that such critical data is only written through pointers with the...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2011

    Frenetic: A Network Programming Language

    Modern networks provide a variety of interrelated services including routing, traffic monitoring, load balancing, and access control. Unfortunately, the languages used to program today's networks lack modern features they are usually defined at the low level of abstraction supplied by the underlying hardware and they fail to provide even rudimentary...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2011

    Time-Dependent Broadband Pricing: Feasibility and Benefits

    Charging different prices for Internet access at different times induces users to spread out their bandwidth consumption across times of the day. Potential impact on ISP revenue, congestion management, and consumer behavior can be significant, yet some fundamental questions remain: is it feasible to operate time dependent pricing and how...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2011

    Profiling Network Performance for Multi-Tier Data Center Applications

    Network performance problems are notoriously tricky to diagnose, and this is magnified when applications are often split into multiple tiers of application components spread across thousands of servers in a data center. Problems often arise in the communication between the tiers, where either the application or the network (or both!)...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2011

    SSDAlloc: Hybrid SSD/RAM Memory Management Made Easy

    The authors introduce SSDAlloc, a hybrid main memory management system that allows developers to treat Solid-State Disk (SSD) as an extension of the RAM in a system. SSDAlloc moves the SSD upward in the memory hierarchy, usable as a larger, slower form of RAM instead of just a cache for...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    A Macroeconomic Model With A Financial Sector

    This paper studies the full equilibrium dynamics of an economy with financial frictions. Due to highly non-linear amplification effects, the economy is prone to instability and occasionally enters volatile episodes. Risk is endogenous and asset price correlations are high in down turns. In an environment of low exogenous risk experts...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Investing In Schooling In Chile: The Role Of Information About Financial Aid For Higher Education

    Recent economic research shows that imperfect information about Mincer returns to education (in developing countries) or about financial aid (in the US) may undermine investments in schooling and exacerbate inequalities in access to education. The authors extend this literature by presenting the results of an experiment that provided children and...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Let the Market Drive Deployment: A Strategy for Transitioning to BGP Security

    With a cryptographic root-of-trust for Internet routing (RPKI) on the horizon, the authors can finally start planning the deployment of one of the secure interdomain routing protocols proposed over a decade ago (Secure BGP, secure origin BGP). However, if experience with IPv6 is any indicator, this will be no easy...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    A Survey of Virtual LAN Usage in Campus Networks

    VLANs are widely used in today's enterprise networks to improve Ethernet scalability and support network policies. However, manuals and textbooks offer very little information about how VLANs are actually used in practice. Through discussions with network administrators and analysis of configuration data, the authors describe how three university campuses and...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    A Service Access Layer, at Your Service

    Historically, Internet services provided clients with access to the resources of a particular host. However, today's services are no longer defined by a single host or confined to a fixed location. Yet, the network architecture continues to impose an unfortunate coupling between hosts and services by binding connections to topology-dependent...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Is There Learning By Exporting: Evidence From The Automobile Industry In China

    Do exporters learn from their exporting experience? While this question seems to have been proven in theory, it nevertheless needs to be tested empirically. In this paper, the author uses an approach, suggested by De Loecker, which corrects for econometric and consistency problems, to estimate productivity. Using data from the...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    There's Something About MRAI: Timing Diversity May Exponentially Worsen BGP Convergence

    To better support interactive applications, individual network operators are decreasing the timers that affect BGP convergence, leading to greater diversity in the timer settings across the Internet. While decreasing timers is intended to improve routing convergence, the authors show that, ironically, the resulting timer heterogeneity can make routing convergence substantially...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    BGP Safety With Spurious Updates

    The authors explore BGP safety, the question of whether a BGP system converges to a stable routing, in light of several BGP implementation features that have not been fully included in the previous theoretical analyses. They show that Route Flap Damping, MRAI timers, and other intra-router features can cause a...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Job Search And Job Finding In A Period Of Mass Unemployment: Evidence From High-Frequency Longitudinal Data

    Several findings in this paper shed light on job search behavior in a depressed job market. Some findings are consistent with the Mortensen (1977) sequential job search model and others are inconsistent with it. In contrast to the prediction of sequential, stationary job search model, the authors find that the...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Routing as a Service

    In Internet routing, there is a fundamental tussle between the end users who want control over the end-to-end paths and the Autonomous Systems (ASes) who want control over the flow of traffic through their infrastructure. To resolve this tussle and offer flexible routing control across multiple routing domains, the authors...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Optimality Certificate of Dynamic Spectrum Management in Multi-Carrier Interference Channels

    The multi-carrier interference channel where interference is treated as additive white Gaussian noise, is a very active topic of research, particularly important in the area of Dynamic Spectrum Management (DSM) for Digital Subscriber Lines (DSL). Here, multiple users optimize their transmit power spectra so as to maximize the total weighted...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Route Optimization in IP Networks

    The performance and reliability of the Internet depend, in large part, on the operation of the underlying routing protocols. Today's IP routing protocols compute paths based on the network topology and configuration parameters, without regard to the current traffic load on the routers and links. The responsibility for adapting the...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Solving Nonconvex Power Control Problems in Wireless Networks: Low SIR Regime and Distributed Algorithms

    In wireless cellular networks that are interference-limited, a variety of power control problems can be formulated as nonlinear optimization with a system-wide objective, e.g., maximizing total system throughput under many QoS constraints from individual users. Previous work have been done in the high SIR regime by turning these problems with...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    PlanetSeer: Internet Path Failure Monitoring and Characterization in Wide-Area Services

    Detecting network path anomalies generally requires examining large volumes of traffic data to find misbehavior. The authors observe that wide-area services, such as peer-to-peer systems and content distribution networks, exhibit large traffic volumes, spread over large numbers of geographically-dispersed endpoints. This makes them ideal candidates for observing wide-area network behavior....

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    A General and Flexible Access-Control System for the Web

    The authors describe the design, implementation, and performance of a new system for access control on the web. To achieve greater flexibility in forming access-control policies-in particular, to allow better interoperability across administrative boundaries-the authors base the system on the ideas of Proof-Carrying Authorization (PCA). The authors extend PCA with...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    Coercing Clients Into Facilitating Failover for Object Delivery

    Application-level protocols used for object delivery, such as HTTP, are built atop TCP/IP and inherit its host-to-host abstraction. Given that these services are replicated for scalability, this unnecessarily exposes failures of individual servers to their clients. While changes to both client and server applications can be used to mask such...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Experiences With CoralCDN: A Five-Year Operational View

    CoralCDN is a self-organizing web content distribution network (CDN). Publishing through CoralCDN is as simple as making a small change to a URL's hostname; a decentralized DNS layer transparently directs browsers to nearby participating cache nodes, which in turn cooperate to minimize load on the origin webserver. CoralCDN has been...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    Secrecy Throughput of MANETs With Malicious Nodes

    MANETs represent one of the most innovative emerging networking technologies, with broad potential applications in personal area networks, emergency and rescue operations, military battlefield applications, etc. The unique features of MANETs, such as mobility and wireless communication, make MANETs a very flexible technology for establishing communication in areas with limited...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Nov 2011

    LearnPADS++ Incremental Inference of Ad Hoc Data Formats

    An ad hoc data source is any semi-structured, non-standard data source. The format of such data sources is often evolving and frequently lacking documentation. Consequently, off-the-shelf tools for processing such data often do not exist, forcing analysts to develop their own tools, a costly and time-consuming process. In this paper,...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Feb 2012

    Network Formation Games Among Relay Stations in Next Generation Wireless Networks

    The introduction of Relay Station (RS) nodes is a key feature in next generation wireless networks such as 3GPP's Long Term Evolution Advanced (LTE-Advanced), or the forthcoming IEEE 802.16j WiMAX standard. This paper presents, using game theory, a novel approach for the formation of the tree architecture that connects the...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    A List-Machine Benchmark for Mechanized Metatheory

    The authors propose a benchmark to compare theorem-proving systems on their ability to express proofs of compiler correctness. In contrast to the first POPL-mark, they emphasize the connection of proofs to compiler implementations, and they point out that much can be done without binders or alpha-conversion. They propose specific criteria...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Serval: An End-Host Stack for Service-Centric Networking

    Internet services run on multiple servers in different locations, serving clients that are often mobile and multi-homed. This does not match well with today's network stack, designed for communication between fixed hosts with topology-dependent addresses. As a result, online service providers resort to clumsy and management intensive work-arounds - forfeiting...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Commensal Cuckoo: Secure Group Partitioning for Large-Scale Services

    The authors present commensal cuckoo, a secure group partitioning scheme for large-scale systems that maintains the correctness of many small groups, despite a Byzantine adversary that controls a constant (global) fraction of all nodes. In particular, the adversary is allowed to repeatedly rejoin faulty nodes to the system in an...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    ILC: A Foundation for Automated Reasoning About Pointer Programs

    This paper shows how to use Girard's intuitionistic linear logic extended with a classical sublogic to reason about pointer programs. More specifically, first, the paper defines the proof theory for ILC (Intuitionistic Linear logic with Constraints) and shows it is well-defined via a proof of cut elimination. Second, inspired by...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    A Distributed Sorting Framework for Ad Hoc Wireless Sensor Networks

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are distributed, self-organizing, pervasive systems, which perform collaborative computations to provide useful information about the underlying stochastic phenomenon. In this paper, the authors explore the ranking and sorting problems in distributed sensor networks which provide perspectives in understanding certain fundamental issues in WSN, as well as...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Oct 2008

    Interference Alignment for Secrecy

    This paper studies the frequency/time selective K-user Gaussian interference channel with secrecy constraints. Two distinct models, namely the interference channel with confidential messages and the one with an external eavesdropper, are analyzed. The key difference between the two models is the lack of Channel State Information (CSI) about the external...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    ARIADNE: Agnostic Reconfiguration in a Disconnected Network Environment

    Extreme transistor technology scaling is causing increasing concerns in device reliability: the expected lifetime of individual transistors in complex chips is quickly decreasing, and the problem is expected to worsen at future technology nodes. With complex designs increasingly relying on Networks-on-Chip (NoCs) for on-chip data transfers, a NoC must continue...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Sep 2008

    Ergodic Two-User Interference Channels: Is Separability Optimal?

    The optimality of separable encoding and decoding over parallel channels (fading states) for ergodic fading two-user InterFerence Channels (IFCs) is studied using a one-sided IFC as a model. For an ergodic fading one-sided IFC with non-fading direct links and a fading cross-channel link, it is shown that separability can be...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    An Analytical Approach to the Adoption of Asymmetric Bidirectional Firewalls: Need for Regulation?

    Recent incidents of cyber-security violations have revealed the importance of having firewalls and other intrusion detection systems to monitor traffic entering and leaving access networks. But the adoption of such security measures is often stymied by 'Free-riding' effects and 'Shortsightedness' among Internet Service Providers (ISPs). In this paper, the authors...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Dec 2011

    Multi-Resource Allocation: Fairness-Efficiency Tradeoffs in a Unifying Framework

    Quantifying the notion of fairness is under-explored when users request different ratios of multiple distinct resource types. A typical example is datacenters processing jobs with heterogeneous resource requirements on CPU, memory, etc. A generalization of max-min fairness to multiple resources was recently proposed in, but may suffer from significant loss...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2011

    Time-Dependent Broadband Pricing: Feasibility and Benefits

    Charging different prices for Internet access at different times induces users to spread out their bandwidth consumption across times of the day. Potential impact on ISP revenue, congestion management, and consumer behavior can be significant, yet some fundamental questions remain: is it feasible to operate time dependent pricing and how...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Sep 2010

    CloneCloud: Boosting Mobile Device Applications Through Cloud Clone Execution

    Mobile applications are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and provide ever richer functionality on mobile devices. At the same time, such devices often enjoy strong connectivity with more powerful machines ranging from laptops and desktops to commercial clouds. This paper presents the design and implementation of CloneCloud, a system that automatically transforms...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    The Diversity-Multiplexing-Delay Tradeoff in MIMO Multihop Networks With ARQ

    The authors study the tradeoff between reliability, data rate, and delay for half-duplex MIMO multi-hop networks that utilize the Automatic-Retransmission-reQuest (ARQ) protocol both in the asymptotic high Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) regime and in the finite SNR regime. They propose novel ARQ protocol designs that optimize these tradeoffs. In particular, they...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Sep 2008

    Uplink Sum-Rate Analysis of a Multicell System With Feedback

    The capacity region of a Multiple Access Channel can be increased by feedback to the sources, since feedback enables cooperative transmission. Focusing on a linear cellular system (as for a highway or a corridor), a novel transmission strategy is proposed that exploits feedback from the neighboring Mobile Stations (MSs). The...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jul 2009

    Maximizing Sum Rate and Minimizing MSE on Multiuser Downlink: Optimality, Fast Algorithms and Equivalence Via Max-Min SIR

    Maximizing the minimum weighted SIR, minimizing the weighted sum MSE and maximizing the weighted sum rate in a multiuser downlink system are three important performance objectives in joint transceiver and power optimization, where all the users have a total power constraint. The authors show that, through connections with the nonlinear...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Fair Greening of Broadband Access: Spectrum Management for Energy-Efficient DSL Networks

    Dynamic Spectrum Management (DSM) is recognized as a promising technology to reduce power consumption in DSL access networks. However, the correct formulation of power-aware DSM problem statements requires a proper understanding of greening, i.e., reducing power consumption. In this paper, the authors therefore investigate greening and show that it can...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // May 2009

    Fair Greening for DSL Broadband Access

    Given that broadband access networks are an integral part of the ICT infrastructure and that DSL is the most widely deployed broadband access technology, greening DSL has become important. The authors' recent work demonstrated a promising trade-off between data rate performance and energy conservation. However, more greening still implies possibly...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Optimality Certificate of Dynamic Spectrum Management in Multi-Carrier Interference Channels

    The multi-carrier interference channel where interference is treated as additive white Gaussian noise, is a very active topic of research, particularly important in the area of Dynamic Spectrum Management (DSM) for Digital Subscriber Lines (DSL). Here, multiple users optimize their transmit power spectra so as to maximize the total weighted...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    Scheduling and Resource Allocation for SVC Streaming Over OFDM Downlink Systems

    The authors consider the problem of scheduling and resource allocation for multi-user video streaming over downlink OFDM channels. The video streams are precoded using the SVC scheme which offers both quality and temporal scalabilities. The OFDM technology provides the maximum flexibility of resource allocation in terms of time, frequency, and...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    The Squam Lake Report: Fifteen Economists In Search Of Financial Reform

    The Squam Lake Report is a volume by economists for economists. It offers the fruits of the labors of 15 top economists who met at Squam Lake, New Hampshire, to discuss financial reform. While somewhat disjointed, and avoiding many important issues, the book is nonetheless a tour du force. Its...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Investing In Schooling In Chile: The Role Of Information About Financial Aid For Higher Education

    Recent economic research shows that imperfect information about Mincer returns to education (in developing countries) or about financial aid (in the US) may undermine investments in schooling and exacerbate inequalities in access to education. The authors extend this literature by presenting the results of an experiment that provided children and...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2009

    Deciphering The Liquidity And Credit Crunch 2007-2008

    The financial market turmoil in 2007 and 2008 has led to the most severe financial crisis since the Great Depression and threatens to have large repercussions on the real economy. The bursting of the housing bubble forced banks to write down several hundred billion dollars in bad loans caused by...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jul 2011

    Hiding Amongst the Clouds: A Proposal for Cloud-Based Onion Routing

    Internet censorship and surveillance have made anonymity tools increasingly critical for free and open Internet access. Tor, and its associated ecosystem of volunteer traffic relays, provides one of the most secure and widely-available means for achieving Internet anonymity today. Unfortunately, Tor has limitations, including poor performance, inadequate capacity, and a...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    The Multi-Way Relay Channel

    The multiuser communication channel, in which multiple users exchange information with the help of a relay terminal, termed the multi-way Relay Channel (mRC), is introduced. In this model, multiple interfering clusters of users communicate simultaneously, where the users within the same cluster wish to exchange messages among themselves. It is...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    Compound Relay Channel With Informed Relay and Destination

    A two-state compound relay channel is considered where the relay and the destination are informed about the channel state while the source is not. Achievable rates and upper bounds are derived for discrete memoryless and Gaussian models, and specialized to a scenario with orthogonal components. It is shown that, apart...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    Multirelay Channel With Non-Ergodic Link Failures

    A multi-relay network is considered in which communication from source to relays takes place over a (discrete or Gaussian) broadcast channel, while the relays are connected to the receiver via orthogonal finite-capacity links. Unbeknownst to the source and relays, link failures may take place between any subset of relays and...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Feb 2009

    A Broadcast Approach to Robust Communications Over Unreliable Multi-Relay Networks

    A multi-relay network is studied in which communication from source to relays takes place over a Gaussian broadcast channel, while the relays are connected to the receiver via orthogonal finite-capacity links. Unbeknownst to the source and relays, link failures may take place between any subset of relays and the destination...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Nov 2008

    Three-User Gaussian Multiple Access Channel With Partially Cooperating Encoders

    A three-user Gaussian Multiple Access Channel (MAC) with encoders partially cooperating over a ring of finite-capacity uni-directional links is studied. The model is a simple extension of the classical two-user MAC with conferencing encoders. Upper and lower bounds on the maximum achievable common rate are derived. The lower bound is...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Nov 2008

    Enhancing Uplink Throughput Via Local Base Station Cooperation

    Joint decoding at the base stations of a cellular wireless network enables inter-cell interference mitigation, thus enhancing the system throughput. However, deployment of joint multicell decoding depends critically on the availability of backhaul links connecting the base stations to a central processor. This paper studies a scenario in which finite-capacity...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Implementing Utility-Optimal CSMA

    Hundreds of papers over the last two decades have studied the theory of distributed scheduling in wireless networks, including a number of them on stability or utility maximizing random access. Several publications in 2008 studied an adaptive CSMA that in theory can approach utility optimality without any message passing under...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Oct 2011

    Pricing by Timing: Innovating Broadband Data Plans

    Wireless Internet data usage is doubling every year. Users are consuming more of high-bandwidth data applications, with usage concentrated on several peak hours in a day. The authors review many of the pricing schemes in practice today and analyze why they do not solve this problem of growing data traffic....

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Partial Information Capacity for Interference Channels

    In distributed wireless networks, nodes often do not know the complete channel gain information of the network. Thus, they have to compute their transmission and reception parameters in a distributed fashion. In this paper, the authors consider the cases when each transmitter knows the channel gain to its intended receiver...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Dec 2011

    Language Abstractions for Software-Defined Networks

    For the past 30 years, networks have been built the same way: out of special-purpose devices running distributed algorithms that provide functionality such as topology discovery, routing, traffic monitoring, and access control. Recent years, however, have seen growing interest in a new kind of network architecture in which a logically-centralized...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    Some Consequences of Paper Fingerprinting for Elections

    Recent research has demonstrated that individual pieces of paper can be fingerprinted and re-identified later at low cost, using commodity scanners. The authors consider the consequences of this fact for electronic voting. The most obvious consequence is negative: the ability to fingerprint paper endangers the secrecy of ballots in any...

    Provided By Princeton University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    P2P Streaming Capacity Under Node Degree Bound

    Two of the fundamental problems in Peer-To-Peer (P2P) streaming are as follows: what is the maximum streaming rate that can be sustained for all receivers, and what peering algorithms can achieve close to this maximum? These problems of computing and approaching the P2P streaming capacity are often challenging because of...

    Provided By Princeton University