Project Smart

Displaying 1-16 of 16 results

  • White Papers // May 2010

    Change Management: The Horror Of It All

    The failure rate of all significant change initiatives is approximately 70%. A global survey conducted in 2008 by McKinsey and Company offered the insight that organisations could only hope to survive by constantly changing, but approximately two thirds of all change initiatives fail. A Computer Weekly study in 2003 of...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Nothing Stays The Same: Leadership Techniques To Empower People During Change Initiatives

    Every organisation is affected by change, especially during times of economic volatility. However, project managers tasked with leading change initiatives are all too aware of the alarming failure rates that can occur. The critical missing piece is largely the failure to take into account how change affects an organisation's people....

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Feb 2010

    Common Project Management Mistakes: Badly Handled Changes

    No matter how well a project is planned and how well the requirements are defined, there will always be requests to change something about the project, usually the product being delivered. There are good reasons for this; business doesn't stand still while your project is going on so one expects...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Three Myths About Organizational Change

    No one will deny the importance of leadership driving and reinforcing the change process throughout the organisation. But does change need to start with leadership? The answer is a definite "No." There are numerous examples of large-scale organisational changes that started as either grass-roots efforts or small trials without much...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Change Management: 3 Key Reasons For The Catastrophic 70% Failure Rate

    Failure reasons in change management are many and varied. But one thing is painfully clear. Any organisational initiative that creates change, or has a significant change element to it, has a 70% chance of not achieving what was originally envisaged. There are 3 main reasons for failure: The gap between...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    Controlling Change Requests

    Changes are an important part of any project. There are two factors at work that guarantee the generation of change requests: changes that happen to the marketplace the project is aimed at, and an unclear understanding of the goals and objectives of the project. The first factor is immutable, one...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Using Change Management And Change Control Within A Project

    In any project, change is inevitable whether it comes from within the project or from external sources, therefore it makes sense to have an agreed process in order to identify, assess and control any potential and approved changes to what was originally agreed for the project. What is needed is...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    The Three P's Of Project Management

    This paper presents the three P's of project management. The three P's are to take into account the elements and structure of project management. People Management is essential in regards to project management. It takes the leadership of the project manager to guide a team towards working together in symmetry...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Mar 2009

    The Corporate Advantages Of A Project Management Process

    A Project Management (PM) process is a process that wraps sound and repeatable structure around a series of events that lead to a projects completion or implementation. In most cases, you will see a structured diagram that lists the project management process groups used to manage a project. In most...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Feb 2009

    Project Plans: 10 Essential Elements

    Many people (and a distressing number of project managers, too) think only of a Gantt chart when they think of a project plan. You may recognise it as what you get from Microsoft Project. This is better called a project schedule, in that it shows when we expect the various...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Jan 2009

    The Ideal Project Manager Specification

    This paper provides the ideal project manager specification including general requirements they must meet along with the 'Hard Skills', the 'Soft Skills', the attitudes and the behaviours that we should look for in our project managers. Successful project management is a combination of approximately 20% hard skills and 80% soft...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Jan 2009

    The Importance Of Communication In Project Management

    If project staff do not know what their tasks are, or how to accomplish them, then the entire project will grind to a halt. If you do not know what the project staff are (not) doing then you will be unable to monitor project progress. And if you are uncertain...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Dec 2008

    Project Portfolio Management: Managing The Project Pipeline

    For most service departments the demand for new projects will occasionally outweigh the department's capacity to do them. Whether it's due to financial constraints or skills being completely exhausted elsewhere, sometimes you just have to say "No." Saying "no" is easy, it's deciding who to say "No" to. Projects that...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Oct 2008

    Your Risk Management Process: A Practical And Effective Approach

    A risk management process does not have to be complicated or time consuming to be effective. By following a simple, tested, and proven approach that involves seven steps taken at the beginning of each project (fewer if a generic list of project risks has already been established), the project team...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Apr 2008

    The Purpose Of Project Management And Setting Objectives

    Project Management has developed in order to plan, co-ordinate and control the complex and diverse activities of modern industrial and commercial projects. All projects share one common characteristic - the projection of ideas and activities into new endeavours. The purpose of project management is to foresee or predict as many...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Mar 2008

    The 3 Different Types Of Project Management Offices

    This paper explains about 3 basic types of Project Management Office (PMO) organisations, varying in the degree of control and influence they have on projects within the organisation. You will need to determine which type you need to establish in order to have an effective project office. Being aware of...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Feb 2009

    Project Plans: 10 Essential Elements

    Many people (and a distressing number of project managers, too) think only of a Gantt chart when they think of a project plan. You may recognise it as what you get from Microsoft Project. This is better called a project schedule, in that it shows when we expect the various...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Oct 2008

    Your Risk Management Process: A Practical And Effective Approach

    A risk management process does not have to be complicated or time consuming to be effective. By following a simple, tested, and proven approach that involves seven steps taken at the beginning of each project (fewer if a generic list of project risks has already been established), the project team...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Mar 2009

    The Corporate Advantages Of A Project Management Process

    A Project Management (PM) process is a process that wraps sound and repeatable structure around a series of events that lead to a projects completion or implementation. In most cases, you will see a structured diagram that lists the project management process groups used to manage a project. In most...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Jan 2009

    The Importance Of Communication In Project Management

    If project staff do not know what their tasks are, or how to accomplish them, then the entire project will grind to a halt. If you do not know what the project staff are (not) doing then you will be unable to monitor project progress. And if you are uncertain...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Jan 2009

    The Ideal Project Manager Specification

    This paper provides the ideal project manager specification including general requirements they must meet along with the 'Hard Skills', the 'Soft Skills', the attitudes and the behaviours that we should look for in our project managers. Successful project management is a combination of approximately 20% hard skills and 80% soft...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Dec 2008

    Project Portfolio Management: Managing The Project Pipeline

    For most service departments the demand for new projects will occasionally outweigh the department's capacity to do them. Whether it's due to financial constraints or skills being completely exhausted elsewhere, sometimes you just have to say "No." Saying "no" is easy, it's deciding who to say "No" to. Projects that...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Mar 2008

    The 3 Different Types Of Project Management Offices

    This paper explains about 3 basic types of Project Management Office (PMO) organisations, varying in the degree of control and influence they have on projects within the organisation. You will need to determine which type you need to establish in order to have an effective project office. Being aware of...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Apr 2008

    The Purpose Of Project Management And Setting Objectives

    Project Management has developed in order to plan, co-ordinate and control the complex and diverse activities of modern industrial and commercial projects. All projects share one common characteristic - the projection of ideas and activities into new endeavours. The purpose of project management is to foresee or predict as many...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    The Three P's Of Project Management

    This paper presents the three P's of project management. The three P's are to take into account the elements and structure of project management. People Management is essential in regards to project management. It takes the leadership of the project manager to guide a team towards working together in symmetry...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Three Myths About Organizational Change

    No one will deny the importance of leadership driving and reinforcing the change process throughout the organisation. But does change need to start with leadership? The answer is a definite "No." There are numerous examples of large-scale organisational changes that started as either grass-roots efforts or small trials without much...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Using Change Management And Change Control Within A Project

    In any project, change is inevitable whether it comes from within the project or from external sources, therefore it makes sense to have an agreed process in order to identify, assess and control any potential and approved changes to what was originally agreed for the project. What is needed is...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Feb 2010

    Common Project Management Mistakes: Badly Handled Changes

    No matter how well a project is planned and how well the requirements are defined, there will always be requests to change something about the project, usually the product being delivered. There are good reasons for this; business doesn't stand still while your project is going on so one expects...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // May 2010

    Change Management: The Horror Of It All

    The failure rate of all significant change initiatives is approximately 70%. A global survey conducted in 2008 by McKinsey and Company offered the insight that organisations could only hope to survive by constantly changing, but approximately two thirds of all change initiatives fail. A Computer Weekly study in 2003 of...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Change Management: 3 Key Reasons For The Catastrophic 70% Failure Rate

    Failure reasons in change management are many and varied. But one thing is painfully clear. Any organisational initiative that creates change, or has a significant change element to it, has a 70% chance of not achieving what was originally envisaged. There are 3 main reasons for failure: The gap between...

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Nothing Stays The Same: Leadership Techniques To Empower People During Change Initiatives

    Every organisation is affected by change, especially during times of economic volatility. However, project managers tasked with leading change initiatives are all too aware of the alarming failure rates that can occur. The critical missing piece is largely the failure to take into account how change affects an organisation's people....

    Provided By Project Smart

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    Controlling Change Requests

    Changes are an important part of any project. There are two factors at work that guarantee the generation of change requests: changes that happen to the marketplace the project is aimed at, and an unclear understanding of the goals and objectives of the project. The first factor is immutable, one...

    Provided By Project Smart