Stanford University

Displaying 1-40 of 428 results

  • White Papers // Oct 2014

    Hardware System Synthesis from Domain-Specific Languages

    Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are very versatile devices, but their complicated programming model has stymied their widespread usage. While modern High-Level Synthesis (HLS) tools provide better programming models, the interface they offer is still too low-level. In order to produce good quality hardware designs with these tools, the users...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2014

    Password Managers: Attacks and Defenses

    The authors study the security of popular password managers and their policies on automatically filling in web passwords. They examine browser built-in password managers, mobile password managers, and 3rd party managers. They observe significant differences in auto fill policies among password managers. Several auto fill policies can lead to disastrous...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2014

    An Experimental Study of TLS Forward Secrecy Deployments

    Forward secrecy guarantees that eavesdroppers simply cannot reveal secret data of past communications. While many TLS servers have deployed the ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (DH) key exchange to support forward secrecy, most sites use weak DH parameters resulting in a false sense of security. In this paper, the authors surveyed a total...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2013

    pFabric: Minimal Near-Optimal Datacenter Transport

    In this paper, the authors present pFabric, a minimalistic datacenter transport design that provides near theoretically optimal flow completion times even at the 99th percentile for short flows, while still minimizing average flow completion time for long flows. Moreover, pFabric delivers this performance with a very simple design that is...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2013

    A Promising Direction for Web Tracking Countermeasures

    Web tracking continues to pose a vexing policy problem. Surveys have repeatedly demonstrated substantial consumer demand for control mechanisms, and policymakers worldwide have pressed for a Do Not Track system that effectuates user preferences. At present, however, consumers are left in the lurch: existing control mechanisms and countermeasures have spotty...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2012

    Channel Capacity Under General Nonuniform Sampling

    This paper develops the fundamental capacity limits of a sampled analog channel under a sub-Nyquist sampling rate constraint. In particular, the authors derive the capacity of sampled analog channels over a general class of time-preserving sampling methods including irregular non-uniform sampling. Their results indicate that the optimal sampling structures extract...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2012

    EyeQ: Practical Network Performance Isolation for the Multi-Tenant Cloud

    The shared multi-tenant nature of the cloud has raised serious concerns about its security and performance for high valued services. Of many shared resources like CPU, memory, etc., the network is pivotal for distributed applications. Benign, or perhaps malicious traffic interference between tenants can cause significant performance degradation that hurts...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2012

    Who Killed My Battery: Analyzing Mobile Browser Energy Consumption

    Despite the growing popularity of mobile web browsing, the energy consumed by a phone browser while surfing the web is poorly understood. The authors present an infrastructure for measuring the precise energy used by a mobile browser to render web pages. They then measure the energy needed to render financial,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2012

    Shannon Meets Nyquist: Capacity Limits of Sampled Analog Channels

    The authors explore two fundamental questions at the intersection of sampling theory and information theory: how is channel capacity affected by sampling below the channel's Nyquist rate, and what sub-Nyquist sampling strategy should be employed to maximize capacity. In particular, they first derive the capacity of sampled analog channels for...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2012

    Synthesis for Optimal Two-Player Decentralized Control Over TCP Erasure Channels With State Feedback

    Recent advances in communication networks and VLSI have made it possible to provide services remotely. In fact, an increasing number of current services and future deployments, such as distributed database management, grid computing, and the smart grid, are now being built over the cloud, making it inevitable that the control,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2012

    Coding Strategies for a Class of Decentralized Control Problems With Limited Communication

    The authors propose a large class of decentralized control problems with non-classical information structure for which a coding strategy is optimal. This class is a generalized version of the hats problem with statistically dependent hat colors where implicit communication via action is allowed. They propose a sufficient condition on the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Optimal Cooperative Control of Dynamically Decoupled Systems

    The authors consider optimal cooperative control problems where multiple dynamically decoupled players cooperate to optimize a coupled objective under limited communication between each player. They present the explicit optimal control in terms of the solutions to a series of Riccati equations, therefore it can be computed in a distributed manner...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Achievable Error Exponents in the Gaussian Channel With Rate-Limited Feedback

    The authors investigate the achievable error probability in communication over an AWGN discrete time memoryless channel with noiseless delay-less rate-limited feedback. For the case where the feedback rate RFB is lower than the data rate R transmitted over the forward channel, they show that the decay of the probability of...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Identity-Based Encryption Is Secure in the Quantum Random Oracle Model

    The authors give the first proof of security for an identity-based encryption scheme in the quantum random oracle model. This is the first unconditional proof of security for any scheme in this model. Their techniques are quite general and they use them to obtain (unconditional) security proofs for two random...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Improved Security for Linearly Homomorphic Signatures: A Generic Framework

    The authors propose a general framework that converts (ordinary) signature schemes having certain properties into linearly homomorphic signature schemes, i.e., schemes that allow authentication of linear functions on signed data. The security of the homomorphic scheme follows from the same computational assumption as is used to prove security of the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2012

    Header Space Analysis: Static Checking for Networks

    Today's networks typically carry or deploy dozens of protocols and mechanisms simultaneously such as MPLS, NAT, ACLs and route redistribution. Even when individual protocols function correctly, failures can arise from the complex interactions of their aggregate, requiring network administrators to be masters of detail. The authors' goal is to automatically...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2012

    Less is More: Trading a Little Bandwidth for Ultra-Low Latency in the Data Center

    Traditional measures of network goodness - goodput, quality of service, fairness - are expressed in terms of bandwidth. Network latency has rarely been a primary concern because delivering the highest level of bandwidth essentially entails driving up latency - at the mean and, especially, at the tail. Recently, however, there...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Initial Thoughts on Custom Network Processing Via Waypoint Services

    Network operators want additional functionality from the networks they manage. The current approach to add functionality is to deploy middleboxes. Unfortunately middle-boxes raise concerns regarding robustness, correctness, and efficiency due to their need to be deployed at chokepoints. This paper provides some initial thoughts for solving the middlebox problem in...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    SCD: A Scalable Coherence Directory With Flexible Sharer Set Encoding

    Large-scale CMPs with hundreds of cores require a directory-based protocol to maintain cache coherence. However, previously proposed coherence directories are hard to scale beyond tens of cores, requiring either excessive area or energy, complex hierarchical protocols, or inexact representations of sharer sets that increase coherence traffic and degrade performance. The...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Network Congestion Avoidance Through Speculative Reservation

    Congestion caused by hot-spot traffic can significantly degrade the performance of a computer network. In this paper, the authors present the Speculative Reservation Protocol (SRP), a new network congestion control mechanism that relieves the effect of hot-spot traffic in high bandwidth, low latency, lossless computer networks. Compared to existing congestion...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Architectural Support for the Stream Execution Model on General-Purpose Processors

    There has recently been much interest in stream processing, both in industry (e.g., Cell, NVIDIA G80, ATI R580) and academia (e.g., Stanford Merrimac, MIT RAW), with stream programs becoming increasingly popular for both media and more general-purpose computing. Although a special style of programming called stream programming is needed to...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Service Differentiation in the Internet to Support Multimedia Traffic

    The current best-effort infrastructure in the Internet lacks key characteristics in terms of delay, jitter, and loss, which are required for multimedia applications (voice, video, and data). Recently, significant progress has been made toward specifying the service differentiation to be provided in the Internet for supporting multimedia applications. In this...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Minimum Expected Distortion in Gaussian Layered Broadcast Coding With Successive Refinement

    A transmitter without Channel State Information (CSI) wishes to send a delay-limited Gaussian source over a slowly fading channel. The source is coded in superimposed layers, with each layer successively refining the description in the previous one. The receiver decodes the layers that are supported by the channel realization and...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    A Methodology for Mapping Multiple Use-Cases Onto Networks on Chips

    A communication-centric design approach, Networks on Chips (NoCs), has emerged as the design paradigm for designing a scalable communication infrastructure for future Systems on Chips (SoCs). As technology advances, the number of applications or use-cases integrated on a single chip increases rapidly. The different use-cases of the SoC have different...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Mapping and Configuration Methods for Multi-Use-Case Networks on Chips

    To provide a scalable communication infrastructure for Systems on Chips (SoCs), Networks on Chips (NoCs), a communication centric design paradigm is needed. To be cost effective, SoCs are often programmable and integrate several different applications or use-cases on to the same chip. For the SoC platform to support the different...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    The Role of SNR in Achieving MIMO Rates in Cooperative Systems

    The authors compare the rate of a multiple-antenna relay channel to the capacity of multiple-antenna systems to characterize the cooperative capacity in different SNR regions. While it is known that in the asymptotic regime, at a high SNR or with a large number of cooperating nodes, cooperative systems lack full...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2011

    Efficient Parallel Graph Exploration on Multi-Core CPU and GPU

    Graphs are a fundamental data representation that have been used extensively in various domains. In graph-based applications, a systematic exploration of the graph such as a Breadth-First Search (BFS) often serves as a key component in the processing of their massive data sets. In this paper, the authors present a...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2011

    Reduced-Dimension Multiuser Detection

    The authors present a Reduced-Dimension MultiUser Detector (RD-MUD) structure that significantly decreases the number of required correlation branches at the receiver front-end, while still achieving performance similar to that of the conventional Matched-Filter (MF) bank. RD-MUD exploits the fact that the number of active users is typically small relative to...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2011

    An Explicit Solution for Optimal Two-Player Decentralized Control Over TCP Erasure Channels With State Feedback

    The authors develop an optimal controller synthesis algorithm for decentralized control problems where control actions are transmitted through TCP-like erasure channels. They consider a simple two-player interconnected linear system and Bernoulli distributed erasure channels. They recast the problem to a centralized Partially Observed Markov Decision Process (POMDP) under the fictitious...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    Decoupling Datacenter Studies From Access to Large-Scale Applications: A Modeling Approach for Storage Workloads

    The cost and power impact of suboptimal storage configurations is significant in DataCenters (DCs) as inefficiencies are aggregated over several thousand servers and represent considerable losses in capital and operating costs. Designing performance, power and cost-optimized systems requires a deep understanding of target workloads, and mechanisms to effectively model different...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    Micro-Interactions With NFC-Enabled Mobile Phones

    This paper coins the term micro-interactions to refer to the class of small exchanges between devices that occur almost instantaneously. For example, a mobile payment using Near-Field Communication (NFC) is a micro-interaction. The arrival of NFC on smart phones makes possible a wide array of applications using micro-interactions, from sharing...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Buffer Sizing in 802.11 Wireless Mesh Networks

    The authors analyze the problem of buffer sizing for TCP flows in 802.11-based Wireless Mesh Networks. Their objective is to maintain high network utilization while providing low queueing delays. The problem is complicated by the time-varying capacity of the wireless channel as well as the random access mechanism of 802.11...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Dynamic Fine-Grain Scheduling of Pipeline Parallelism

    Scheduling pipeline-parallel programs, defined as a graph of stages that communicate explicitly through queues, is challenging. When the application is regular and the underlying architecture can guarantee predictable execution times, several techniques exist to compute highly optimized static schedules. However, these schedules do not admit run-time load balancing, so variability...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Black-Box Randomized Reductions in Algorithmic Mechanism Design

    The authors give the first black-box reduction from arbitrary approximation algorithms to truthful approximation mechanisms for a non-trivial class of multi-parameter problems. Specifically, they prove that every welfare-maximization problem that admits an FPTAS and can be encoded as a packing problem also admits a truthful-in-expectation randomized mechanism that is an...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    On the Role of Mobility for Multi-Message Gossip

    In wireless ad hoc or social networks, a variety of scenarios require agents to share their individual information or resources with each other for mutual benefit. A partial list includes file sharing and rumor spreading, distributed computation and parameter estimation, and scheduling and control. Due to the huge centralization overhead...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2011

    Time and Cost-Efficient Modeling and Generation of Large-Scale TPCC/TPCE/TPCH Workloads

    Large-scale TPC workloads are critical for the evaluation of datacenter-scale storage systems. However, these workloads have not been previously characterized, in-depth, and modeled in a DC environment. In this paper, the authors categorize the TPC workloads into storage threads that have unique features and characterize the storage activity of TPCC,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2011

    Uplink Resource Allocation for Frequency Selective Channels and Fractional Power Control in LTE

    The authors consider the allocation of spectral and power resources every subframe (1 ms) on the uplink of the Long Term Evolution (LTE) wideband Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA) cellular network. System bandwidth is divided into multiple sub-bands. The fractional power control to manage interference is allowed to be...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    Targeted Malleability: Homomorphic Encryption for Restricted Computations

    The authors put forward the notion of targeted malleability: given a homomorphic encryption scheme, in various scenarios they would like to restrict the homomorphic computations one can perform on encrypted data. They introduced a precise framework, generalizing the foundational notion of non-malleability introduced by Dolev, Dwork, and Naor (SICOMP '00),...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    Parallelizing Machine Learning - Functionally

    Implementing machine learning algorithms for large data, such as the Web graph and social networks, is challenging. Even though much research has focused on making sequential algorithms more scalable, their running times continue to be prohibitively long. Meanwhile, parallelization remains a formidable challenge for this class of problems, despite frameworks...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // May 2011

    Innovate For America

    The presenter focuses on advancing technology and innovation to unlock national economic growth and prosperity. In this webcast, the presenter challenges students and entrepreneurs to take action now to bring innovation to the healthcare, education and government sectors.

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2002

    Seasonality and Competition in Time: An Empirical Analysis of Release Date Decisions in the U.S. Motion Picture Industry

    Strong seasonality in demand, a short product life cycle, and the absence of any price competition make the release date of first-run movies one of the main strategic decisions taken by movies? distributors. The absence of good observable measures of product quality creates a difficulty in separately identifying the two...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Blueprint for Introducing Innovation Into the Wireless Networks We Use Every Day

    Few changes are occurred in the past couple of years in wireless industry: Handsets have become mobile computers running user-contributed applications on (potentially) open operating systems. It seems world is on an unstoppable path towards a more open ecosystem; one that has been previously closed and proprietary. The biggest winners...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Ground Station Virtualization

    This paper discusses the application of the end-to-end principle to ground station systems. It states that lower layers of systems should support the widest possible variety of services and functions. This is applied to ground stations to derive a core set of services that are used across multiple missions while...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Evidence-Based Management For Entrepreneurial Environments: Faster And Better Decisions With Less Risk

    Entrepreneurship is risky. Most new technologies and new businesses fail. Two things seem to be true. First, evidence-based management could improve entrepreneurial decision-making, reducing risks, costs, and wasted time and effort - just as an evidence-based approach could benefit most if not all organizations and just as evidence-based medicine has...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Sales Simulator Throws Curveballs To Students

    Sloan Fellow Jonathan Solomon has renewed sympathy for sales managers - particularly those he used to employ. That's because he took a Business School elective titled Building and Managing Professional Sales Organizations, a class that simulates the world of selling portable ultrasound devices. "I used to crush the VP of...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Certified Lies: Detecting And Defeating Government Interception Attacks Against SSL

    This paper introduces compelled certificate creation attack, in which government agencies may compel a certificate authority to issue false SSL certificates that can be used by intelligence agencies to covertly intercept and hijack individuals' secure Web-based communications. Although, no direct evidences are available that this form of active surveillance is...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Eliminating Sales Quotas May Stimulate Profits

    Eliminating sales quotas boosts company profits says Professor Harikesh Nair. In one case, the new sales compensation plan without quotas resulted in a 9% improvement in overall revenues, which translates to about $1 million of incremental revenues per month. How do you pay your sales force in a way that...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Outsourcing May Hurt Fashion Manufacturers' Bottom Line

    Fast fashion-designing products that capture the latest consumer trends, and then spending extra money to get them to market quickly, can be well worth the extra expense, increasing profits exponentially, says Stanford Graduate School of Business Professor Robert Swinney, coauthor of a recent study. Most companies in the fashion industry...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    All Entrepreneurship Is Social

    Over the past decade or so, the term social entrepreneur has become a fashionable way of describing individuals and organizations that, in their attempts at large-scale change, blur the traditional boundaries between the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Given the ceaseless appearance of innovations and new institutional forms, we should welcome...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Case For Stakeholder Engagement

    This paper explores the experiences of the Davis Foundation and other grantmakers as they work more closely with important stakeholders, and the benefits that this engagement brings to grantmakers, grantees, and the communities they both serve. The benefits that come from engagement are many, including developing a deeper understanding of...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Social Pressures Affect Corporate Strategy And Performance

    Greater social pressure can result in better social performance. In other words, firms step up responsible behavior in response to pressure. Nike became an industry leader in promoting better working conditions in apparel and footwear factories in Asia and elsewhere after activists made the company a prominent target in the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Switch Scheduling Via Randomized Edge Coloring

    The essence of an Internet router is an n x n switch which routes packets from input to output ports. Such a switch can be viewed as a bipartite graph with the input and output ports as the two vertex sets. Packets arriving at input port i and destined for...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2010

    Nonprofits Are Seen As Warm And For-Profits As Competent: Firm Stereotypes Matter

    Consumers use warmth and competence, two fundamental dimensions that govern social judgments of people, to form perceptions of firms. Three experiments showed that consumers perceive nonprofits as being warmer than for-profits but as less competent. Further, consumers are less willing to buy a product made by a nonprofit than a...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Beating The Crowd At Picking Stocks

    Charles Lee's portfolio management style requires accounting for human biases to nudge prices closer to their real value. By now, the fallout from the epic financial crisis is both familiar and tangible: foreclosed mortgages, failed banks, lost jobs, recession. On the less tangible side, the meltdown also shook faith in...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    An Architecture for Content Routing Support in the Internet

    The primary use of the Internet is content distribution the delivery of web pages, audio, and video to client applications yet the Internet was never architected for scalable content delivery. The result has been a proliferation of proprietary protocols and ad hoc mechanisms to meet growing content demand. In this...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Reserve Prices In Internet Advertising Auctions: A Field Experiment

    The author presents the results of a large field experiment on setting reserve prices in auctions for online advertisements, guided by the theory of optimal auction design suitably adapted to the sponsored search setting. Consistent with the theory, following the introduction of new reserve prices revenues in these auctions have...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Services Market Is Key To Open Source Software

    Open source software has become a major and fast-growing presence in the computer industry in recent years. Professor Tunay Tunca of Stanford Graduate School of Business and his co-authors argue that the key factor in whether to create open source software is the strength of the market for support, integration,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2010

    Matching In Networks With Bilateral Contracts

    This paper introduces a model in which firms trade goods via bilateral contracts which specify a buyer, a seller, and the terms of the exchange. This setting subsumes (manyto-many) matching with contracts, as well as supply chain matching. When firms' relationships do not exhibit a supply chain structure, stable allocations...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2010

    A Comparative Analysis Of Strategies And Strategy-Making In The U.S. And China

    The comparative studies indicate that change toward adoption of the electric car and clean coal within the U.S. and China, as well as transnational change toward developing clean energy and reducing global warming, is likely to be slower than many would wish. While it is frustrating to have to come...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Building Sustainable Organizations: The Human Factor

    Although most of the research and public pressure concerning sustainability has been focused on the effects of business and organizational activity on the physical environment, companies and their management practices profoundly affect the human and social environment as well. This paper briefly reviews the literature on the direct and indirect...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Policy Perspectives On OTC Derivatives Market Infrastructure

    In the wake of the recent financial crisis, Over-The-Counter (OTC) derivatives have been blamed for increasing systemic risk. Although OTC derivatives were not a central cause of the crisis, the complexity and limited transparency of the market reinforced the potential for excessive risk-taking, as regulators did not have a clear...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2010

    Performance-Based Incentives For Internal Monitors

    This study examines the use of performance-based incentives for internal monitors (general counsel and chief internal auditor) and whether these incentives impair monitors' independence by aligning their interests with the interests of those being monitored. Some evidences found that incentives are greater when monitors' job duties contribute more to the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Increased-Liability Equity: A Proposal To Improve Capital Regulation Of Large Financial Institutions

    While it is recognized that the high degree of leverage used by financial institutions creates systemic risks and other negative externalities, many argue that financial institutions must rely on extensive debt financing since equity financing is "Expensive." Some of the reasons debt is attractive to financial institutions, such as tax...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    DAML-S: Web Service Description for the Semantic Web

    This paper presents DAML-S, DAML + OIL ontology for describing the properties and capabilities of Web Services. Web Services Web-accessible programs and devices - are garnering a great deal of interest from industry, and standards are emerging for low-level descriptions of Web Services. DAML-S complements this effort by providing Web...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2010

    How Costly Is Diversity? Affirmative Action In Light Of Gender Differences In Competitiveness

    Affirmative action is often criticized for causing reverse discrimination and lowering the qualifications of those selected under the policy. However the magnitude of such adverse effects depends on whether the best suited candidate is hired absent the policy. Indeed an attraction of affirmative action is that it can compensate for...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Jan 2010

    Playing It Small Doesn't Mean Not Making Money

    Skewed expectations present a major risk when accepting venture capital. Most venture capitalists expect to make a lot of money, and they expect the company they help to become billion-dollar ventures. David Heinemeier Hansson, partner at 37signals, compares this type of risk to putting all of your money on red...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2009

    An Entrepreneur's Checklist

    No matter what business vertical you're entering, serial entrepreneur Steve Blank outlines a few points of necessary focus for the emerging business start-up, including market opportunity, market regulations and distribution, competitors and complimentors, and technology breakthroughs. He notes that the customer is not always the same thing as the payer,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2003

    Market Potential: GameBoy

    Erin Turner, a producer at Electronic Arts specializing in action-hero titles, explains that the GameBoy has a pretty substantial market with 40 million sold worldwide. The mission with the GameBoy is to create some unique draw or additional fun factor, since it does not have nearly the graphical capabilities as...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Crawler-Friendly Web Servers

    A web crawler is a program that automatically downloads pages from the Web. A typical crawler starts with a seed set of pages (e.g., yahoo.com and aol.com). It then downloads these pages, extracts hyperlinks and crawls pages pointed to by these new hyperlinks. The crawler repeats this step until there...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // May 2010

    Who Makes The Best VC?

    Is an operations background a mandatory prerequisite for running a start-up? Not necessarily, but it helps, says serial entrepreneur Marc Andreessen. While nearly anyone with any experience can manage a successful enterprise, it helps to have had hands-on experience in the event of layoffs, restructuring, and the like.

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Sep 2009

    China's Labor Demands In Computer Science

    More than 700,000 computer science-related engineering students graduate each year in China, but few from this labor pool have the experience necessary to help an innovative company grow, says Robin Li, CEO of search engine Baidu. And, he points out, the management opportunities on a global scale are tremendous. That...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Oct 2009

    The Fight For Corporate Control

    We learn from the index and not the table of contents, says Bing Gordon, partner at KPCB. In this webcast, Gordon and Zynga CEO Mark Pincus talk about how an effective CEO can make strategy and mission happen when they are not physically present in the room. Pincus also discusses...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Oct 2009

    The Growing Demand For Engineering Talent

    To keep up with the engineering demands of Moore's Law, Craig Barrett, former Intel Chairman of the Board, discusses how the education and labor requirements of talent have evolved with the industry. While developing the first semiconductors took a team of only three people, today's market requires several hundred engineers...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Success Is Not About You

    Being humble isn't merely a kind gesture; it's the only way to still respect yourself in the midst of a trying start-up experience. Pandora CTO Tom Conrad urges entrepreneurs to resist the cult of personality that can permeate a company, and instead revel in the combined success of your team...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2009

    Anyone Can Be An Entrepreneur

    Artists Quincy Jones III and Chamilionaire discuss the myriad ways that online media and technology have leveled the playing field for "e-hustling", or the pursuit of entrepreneurship. Jones equates the Internet to the turntable when it comes to its thumbprint on hip-hop culture, whereas Chamillionaire extols Twitter as a frighteningly...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2009

    Changing The World through Innovation

    Stanford President John Hennessy kicks off the 2009 Global Innovation Tournament by challenging students to solve the world's major problems through innovation.

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Sep 2009

    The Lean Startup: Debunking Myths Of Entrepreneurship

    A startup is not a "Doll house" version of a larger enterprise. It's a human institution trying to start something new under extreme conditions of uncertainty, says author Eric Ries. It's not that some founders have better ideas than others, and this is what dictates success. What differentiates a successfully...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Are Business Plans A Work Of Fiction?

    Can one truly develop a business plan before having a product or a customer in-hand? Not very successfully, contends KPCB partner Randy Komisar. In this webcast, Komisar discusses the premise for his book, Getting to Plan B, in which he points out how often the theory of a start-up succumbs...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Sep 2009

    The Five Whys

    Understand and question deeply the root causes - i.e. the "Human problems" - behind every technical mishap, else your startup will be hindered in its progress. So advises entrepreneur and author Eric Ries, who suggests a layered analysis of decisions and procedures behind every technical undertaking. Follow up these questions...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Sep 2009

    Harnessing The Power Of Early Adopters

    After a very hi-profile startup failure, author Eric Ries and other co-founders launched a second startup product in just six months - with technically hazardous results. Rather than investing the resources necessary to craft quality software, they decided to switch tactics and release a buggy version quickly to determine if...

    Provided By Stanford University