Stanford University

Displaying 241-280 of 447 results

  • White Papers // May 2010

    Separation Logic and the Mashup Isolation Problem

    This paper was done as part of the author's PhD qualifier exam. The author's qualifier exam problem was to perform an in depth study of separation logic. In this paper, he surveys two variants of separation and then shows how they can apply to solve the isolation problem for mashups....

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2010

    Towards a Formal Foundation of Web Security

    This paper proposes a formal model of web security based on an abstraction of the web platform and use this model to analyze the security of several sample web mechanisms and applications. The authors identify three distinct threat models that can be used to analyze web applications, ranging from a...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    The Advantage Of Not Marketing

    Pandora CTO Tom Conrad invites start-ups to "Be genuine". Rather than investing in marketing, Pandora simply asks its users to a coffee. In lieu of a form letter, new users - all 50,000 of them daily - receive an automated email with the founder's true email address, and their feedback...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Podcasts // Apr 2010

    A Pandora's Box Of Start-Up Expertise

    After nearly two decades in the trenches of Pets.com, Apple Computer, and the You Don't Know Jack game series at Berkeley Systems, Tom Conrad (Pandora CTO) shares his acquired wisdom on succeeding in the consumer internet space. He discusses agility, crisp decision making, and focus, and peppers his lessons with...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Look For Opportunities To "Go Deep"

    Miles wide and a quarter-of-an-inch deep, recalls Tom Conrad, Pandora CTO, of the work experience that he had while working at Apple. Employees were expected to dabble in all areas, from engineering to product design. Conrad contrasts this with his experience at Berkeley Systems, where he had the opportunity to...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Dwarfed By Metrics

    With over 50 million listeners, Pandora is easily one of the most popular online music vehicles. But as compared to the entire mass radio spectrum, Pandora remains a mere blip on the airwaves. CTO Tom Conrad states that a key strategy in remaining focused comes from the metrics enterprises choose...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    The Second Time's The Charm

    After initially turning down the opportunity to work for Pandora (formerly called Savage Beast), Tom Conrad, CTO, shares an anecdote about how following his passion led to tremendous personal and professional success. Though he eventually accepted the job with reservations, six weeks later it became the exact position he had...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Strive To Remain Agile

    Despite the company's growing size, Pandora CTO Tom Conrad states that his company resists the urge to make any long-term plans. In fact, they never plan an operating schedule more than three months in advance. Though this practice makes some operations more difficult, the flexibility allows the upstart enterprise to...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Success Is Not About You

    Being humble isn't merely a kind gesture; it's the only way to still respect yourself in the midst of a trying start-up experience. Pandora CTO Tom Conrad urges entrepreneurs to resist the cult of personality that can permeate a company, and instead revel in the combined success of your team...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Career Resources & Services For The Mechanical Engineering Department

    It is estimated that there are more than 200,000 mechanical engineers employed in the United States and twice that worldwide. The employers of these engineers are academia, the government and private industry - with industry employing more than half. Whatever path you choose, you will find that mechanical engineers are...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Venture Capital's Improved Navigation Of Clean Tech

    Emerging technologies in the field of energy have the potential for tremendous pay out. But the flip side of that equation also means that some ventures require substantial investment to launch. Miox CEO Carlos Perea offers an interesting industry perspective on the state of venture funding in clean technologies. In...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Podcasts // Apr 2010

    The Ebb And Flow Of Clean Tech And Entrepreneurs

    Twenty percent of the world's population does not have access to clean drinking water, says Miox CEO Carlos Perea. What's an entrepreneur to do? Ideally, find a way to clean and reuse the global water supply that's, "Twice as good at half the cost" of conventional chlorine decontamination. In this...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Creating True Value Proposition In Clean Tech

    Improved safety and water quality aren't the only results of displacing chlorine as a water purifier. Carlos Perea, Miox CEO, points out that saving money is the main reason that his private and municipal customers utilize his company's water treatment capabilities. He states that Miox's focus is always on driving...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    The Challenges Of Building A Company

    Improved safety and water quality aren't the only results of displacing chlorine as a water purifier. Carlos Perea, Miox CEO, points out that saving money is the main reason that his private and municipal customers utilize his company's water treatment capabilities. He states that Miox's focus is always on driving...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Attracting A Motivated Team

    Miox CEO Carlos Perea was able to lure top talent to his venture by allowing the product to sell itself. He shares an anecdote about how his employee learned first-hand the power and impact of clean drinking water while on a trip to Honduras, and how this urged him to...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Don't Lose Faith In Your Start-up

    Frazzled feelings and brick walls are frequently part of the trying path to start-up success. In this inspiring webcast from Miox CEO Carlos Perea, he shares in that frustration, and also shares an anecdote that rekindles his company's opportunity to save lives and improve living conditions worldwide. Perea urges other...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Certified Lies: Detecting And Defeating Government Interception Attacks Against SSL

    This paper introduces compelled certificate creation attack, in which government agencies may compel a certificate authority to issue false SSL certificates that can be used by intelligence agencies to covertly intercept and hijack individuals' secure Web-based communications. Although, no direct evidences are available that this form of active surveillance is...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Exposing More "Surfaces"

    By appropriating knowledge and thinkers from a broader scope of learning - i.e. exposing more "Surfaces" - John Seely Brown, Independent Co-Chairman from the Deloitte Center for the Edge, states that knowledge from outside a field of expertise can be banked and extremely valuable to stirring up innovation in one's...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Pulling The Core To The Edge

    Rather than trickling new innovations from the edge to the core, is it possible, rather, for the edge to dominate? The creative thinking of John Seely Brown, Deloitte Center for the Edge Independent Co-Chairman and former Chief Scientist of Xerox PARC, seeks to bring this flavor of creative thinking to...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    The Business School Of Extreme Aerial Surfing

    Entrepreneurship isn't just a sport; it's extreme. John Seely Brown, Deloitte Center for the Edge's Independent Co-Chairman, paid attention when suddenly five of the globe's top aerial surfers originated from the same place. Why the sudden regional success? Though fierce competitors, they all knew one another and collectively benchmarked from...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Shaping Serendipity

    Success is based on more than just luck. By choosing the right kind of environment and cultivating the practices that will help find new ideas, one can take inspiration from unlikely sources. Furthermore, deep listening with reciprocity - meaning not only digging for good ideas from others, but offering them...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Material Science Start-Ups In The Modern Age

    With just ten people and as little as $50,000, new garage-based enterprises that used to require hefty start-up costs and infrastructure can grow larger and more productive with fewer resources than ever before, says Deloitte Center for the Edge Independent Co-Chairman John Seely Brown. Entrepreneurs in the 21st century need...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Podcasts // Apr 2010

    Collaborative Innovation And A Pull Economy

    What can extreme surfing and World of Warcraft teach the enterprise? Independent Co-Chairman of the Deloitte Center for the Edge and former Xerox PARC Chief Scientist John Seely Brown holds them as examples of the power of frequent benchmarking and full industry info-share. He also uses them to show how...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    The Knowledge Economy Of World Of Warcraft

    Within the guilds of this popular computer game, real innovation is taking place. Thousands of new ideas happen daily through crowdsourcing. In addition, all performance is measured and critiqued, both as a group and individually. Guilds also work collaboratively on larger projects, allowing for radical, exponential learning and results. Deloitte...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Investment Arenas Of 2010

    Randy Komisar, a partner with VC firm KPCB, opines on the most recent trends for investment as of Spring of 2010. He points out that the consumer internet is a difficult business to gauge, and gives that sector a yellow light. However, he gives a green light to green and...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    The Benefits Of Mapping Plan A

    Though Randy Komisar, KPCB partner and seasoned entrepreneur, proposes that most successful ventures do not find success in their initial business idea, he still maintains that there's value in constructing a thoughtful initial business plan. "Plan A" should help flesh out your business' assumptions, challenges, and risk mitigation. Those critical...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Identifying Leaps Of Faith

    Don't avoid taking a leap of faith, says partner at KPCB Randy Komisar, but be certain to correctly define it. What's key in successfully making the jump is that it prioritizes three questions you're forced to answer, providing extreme market and product focus. The result will either flatten your idea...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Beyond The Social Web

    The early days of the Web were focused around email and one-on-one communication. The Web then evolved into a valuable resource for information. Later, it became a media hub, and today it runs on social networking powered by people. In this thoughtful clip, KPCB's Randy Komisar ponders not only the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Are Business Plans A Work Of Fiction?

    Can one truly develop a business plan before having a product or a customer in-hand? Not very successfully, contends KPCB partner Randy Komisar. In this webcast, Komisar discusses the premise for his book, Getting to Plan B, in which he points out how often the theory of a start-up succumbs...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Podcasts // Apr 2010

    Getting To Plan B

    While Plan A may begin the backbone on which an entrepreneurial idea is hinged, succinct data gathering and constant market evaluation more often lead to profit with the next idea in line. The tech sector breeds innovation, says KPCB partner and frequent speaker Randy Komisar, and to do so it...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    A Customer's Unknown Delight

    In conversation with Stanford's Tina Seelig, KPCB's Randy Komisar points out that while customer feedback is a good idea, it should not be the de facto driver for products and solutions. Too often, consumers miss the mark on inventions (such as ATM's and mobile phones) because they can't conceive that...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Preventing Pollution Attacks in Multi-Source Network Coding

    Network coding is a method for achieving channel capacity in networks. The key idea is to allow network routers to linearly mix packets as they traverse the network so that recipients receive linear combinations of packets. Network coded systems are vulnerable to pollution attacks where a single malicious node floods...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Leadership: A Personnel Economics Approach

    A theory of leadership is proposed and tested. Leaders are characterized as those who have the ability to choose the right direction more frequently than their peers. The theory implies that leaders tend to be more able, place themselves in visible decision making situations more frequently, and are generalists. Also,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Faster Algorithms for Minimum-Energy Scheduling of Wireless Data Transmissions

    This paper considers the problem of minimizing the energy used in transmitting a given sequence of packets with specified completion deadlines from a node in a wireless packet network. The packets have to be transmitted in first-in-first-out order. Packets can be destined to different receivers. The channel conditions to each...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Fingerprinting Mobile User Positions in Sensor Networks

    The authors demonstrate that the network flux over the sensor network provides them fingerprint information about the mobile users within the field. Such information is exoteric in the physical space and easy to access through passive sniffing. They present a theoretical model to abstract the network flux according to the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Evaluating Bufferless Flow Control for On-Chip Networks

    With the emergence of on-chip networks, the power consumed by router buffers has become a primary concern. Bufferless flow control addresses this issue by removing router buffers, and handles contention by dropping or deflecting flits. This paper compares virtual-channel (buffered) and deflection (packet-switched bufferless) flow control. The authors' evaluation includes...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Making Aggregation Work in Uncertain and Probabilistic Databases

    The authors describe how aggregation is handled in the Trio system for uncertain and probabilistic data. Because "Exact" aggregation in uncertain databases can produce exponentially-sized results, they provide three alternatives: a low bound on the aggregate value, a high bound on the value, and the expected value. These variants return...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    A Large-Scale Architecture for Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    Deep Belief Nets (DBNs) are an emerging application in the machine learning domain, which use Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) as their basic building block. Although small scale DBNs have shown great potential, the computational cost of RBM training has been a major challenge in scaling to large networks. In this...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    CHOKe a Stateless Mechanism for Providing Quality of Service in the Internet

    The authors investigate the problem of providing a fair bandwidth allocation to each of n flows that share the outgoing link of a congested router. The buffer at the outgoing link is a simple FIFO, shared by packets belonging to the n flows. They devise a simple packet dropping scheme,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Homomorphic MACs: MAC-Based Integrity for Network Coding

    Network coding has been shown to improve the capacity and robustness in networks. However, since intermediate nodes modify packets en-route, integrity of data cannot be checked using traditional MACs and checksums. In addition, network coded systems are vulnerable to pollution attacks where a single malicious node can flood the network...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Cycle-Accurate Simulation of Energy Consumption in Embedded Systems

    This paper presents a methodology for cycle-accurate simulation of energy dissipation in embedded systems. The ARM Ltd instruction-level cycle-accurate simulator is extended with energy models for the processor the L2 cache, the memory the interconnect and the DC-DC converter. A SmartBadge which can be seen as an embedded system consisting...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Event-Driven Power Management of Portable Systems

    The policy optimization problem for dynamic power management has received considerable attention in the recent past. The authors formulate policy optimization as a constrained optimization problem on continuous-time Semi-Markov Decision Processes (SMDP). SMDPs generalize the stochastic optimization approach based on discrete-time Markov Decision Processes (DTMDP) presented in the earlier work...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    The Future of the Internet is Coordination

    The key functionality of a Coordinated Internet would be that the Internet actively watches what people do (analogous to search completion on desktops today), correlates these activities, and actively notifies people when and how their current tasks affect and are affected by the activities of other people. Such a Coordinated...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Enterprise Coordination on the Internet

    Enterprises are now connected internally and externally to other Enterprises via the Internet in ways that are increasingly difficult to manage, especially as these interconnections become more dynamic. Current methods of coordinating the effects of change as they propagate through these networks of connections are not likely to scale. What...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2010

    An Exit Rule For Monetary Policy

    A simple exit rule from the extraordinary measures taken by the Federal Reserve in the past two years is proposed. The rule describes the joint path of the interest rate and the level of reserves. The rule has several attractive properties including a predictable return to traditional monetary policy which...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Applications of Multilinear Forms to Cryptography

    The authors study the problem of finding efficiently computable non-degenerate multilinear maps from Gn 1 to G2, where G1 and G2 are groups of the same prime order, and where computing discrete logarithms in G1 is hard. They present several applications to cryptography, explore directions for building such maps, and...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Aggregate and Verifiably Encrypted Signatures From Bilinear Maps

    An aggregate signature scheme is a digital signature that supports aggregation: Given n signatures on n distinct messages from n distinct users, it is possible to aggregate all these signatures into a single short signature. This single signature (and the n original messages) will convince the verifier that the n...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Functional Encryption: Definitions and Challenges

    The authors initiate the formal study of functional encryption by giving precise definitions of the concept and its security. Roughly speaking, functional encryption supports restricted secret keys that enable a key holder to learn a specific function of encrypted data, but learn nothing else about the data. For example, given...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    Kamouflage: Loss-Resistant Password Management

    The authors introduce Kamouflage: a new architecture for building theft-resistant password managers. An attacker who steals a laptop or cell phone with a Kamouflage-based password manager is forced to carry out a considerable amount of online work before obtaining any user credentials. They implemented the proposal as a replacement for...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Symmetric Cryptography in Javascript

    The authors take a systematic approach to developing a symmetric cryptography library in Javascript. They study various strategies for optimizing the code for the Javascript interpreter, and observe that traditional crypto optimization techniques do not apply when implemented in Javascript. They propose a number of optimizations that reduce both running...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Identity-Based Encryption From the Weil Pairing

    The authors propose a fully functional Identity-Based Encryption scheme (IBE). The scheme has chosen ciphertext security in the random oracle model assuming a variant of the computational Diffie-Hellman problem. The system is based on bilinear maps between groups. The Weil pairing on elliptic curves is an example of such a...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2011

    Efficient Selective Identity-Based Encryption Without Random Oracles

    The authors construct two efficient Identity-Based Encryption (IBE) systems that admit selective-identity security reductions without random oracles in groups equipped with a bilinear map. Selective-identity secure IBE is a slightly weaker security model than the standard security model for IBE. In this model the adversary must commit ahead of time...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Framing Attacks on Smart Phones and Dumb Routers: Tap-Jacking and Geo-Localization Attacks

    While many popular web sites on the Internet use frame busting to defend against clickjacking, very few mobile sites use frame busting. Similarly, few embedded web sites such as those used on home routers use frame busting. In this paper the authors show that framing attacks on mobile sites and...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Busting Frame Busting: A Study of Clickjacking Vulnerabilities on Popular Sites

    Web framing attacks such as clickjacking use iframes to hijack a user's web session. The most common defense, called frame busting, prevents a site from functioning when loaded inside a frame. The authors study frame busting practices for the Alexa Top-500 sites and show that all can be circumvented in...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Attacking an Obfuscated Cipher by Injecting Faults

    The authors study the strength of certain obfuscation techniques used to protect software from reverse engineering and tampering. They show that some common obfuscation methods can be defeated using a fault injection attack, namely an attack where during program execution an attacker injects errors into the program environment. By observing...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Perspective: Semantic Data Management for the Home

    An increasing number of home and personal electronic devices create, use, and display digitized forms of music, images, and videos, as well as more conventional files (e.g., financial records and contact lists). In-home networks enable these devices to communicate, and a variety of device-specific and datatype-specific tools are emerging. The...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Preventing Pollution Attacks in Multi-Source Network Coding

    Network coding is a method for achieving channel capacity in networks. The key idea is to allow network routers to linearly mix packets as they traverse the network so that recipients receive linear combinations of packets. Network coded systems are vulnerable to pollution attacks where a single malicious node floods...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2010

    Linearly Homomorphic Signatures Over Binary Fields and New Tools for Lattice-Based Signatures

    The authors propose a linearly homomorphic signature scheme that authenticates vector subspaces of a given ambient space. The system has several novel properties not found in previous proposals: It is the first such scheme that authenticates vectors defined over binary fields; previous proposals could only authenticate vectors with large or...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    Computing on Authenticated Data

    In tandem with recent progress on computing on encrypted data via fully homomorphic encryption, the authors present a framework for computing on authenticated data via the notion of slightly homomorphic signatures, or P-homomorphic signatures. With such signatures, it is possible for a third party to derive a signature on the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Improved Efficiency for CCA-Secure Cryptosystems Built Using Identity-Based Encryption

    Recently, Canetti, Halevi, and Katz showed a general method for constructing CCA-secure encryption schemes from identity-based encryption schemes in the standard model. The authors improve the efficiency of their construction, and show two specific instantiations of the resulting scheme which offer the most efficient encryption (and, in one case, key...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Client Side Caching for TLS

    The authors propose two new mechanisms for caching handshake information on TLS clients. The "Fast-track" mechanism provides a client side cache of a server's public parameters and negotiated parameters in the course of an initial, enabling handshake. These parameters need not be resent on subsequent handshakes. Fast-track reduces both network...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Remote Timing Attacks Are Practical

    Timing attacks are usually used to attack weak computing devices such as smartcards. The authors show that timing attacks apply to general software systems. Specifically, they devise a timing attack against OpenSSL. The experiments show that they can extract private keys from an OpenSSL-based web server running on a machine...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Homomorphic MACs: MAC-Based Integrity for Network Coding

    Network coding has been shown to improve the capacity and robustness in networks. However, since intermediate nodes modify packets en-route, integrity of data cannot be checked using traditional MACs and checksums. In addition, network coded systems are vulnerable to pollution attacks where a single malicious node can flood the network...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    A Secure Signature Scheme From Bilinear Maps

    The authors present a new class of signature schemes based on properties of certain bilinear algebraic maps. These signatures are secure against existential forgery under a chosen message attack in the standard model (without using the random oracle model). Security is based on the computational Diffie-Hellman problem. The concrete schemes...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Implementation of the Trigonometric LMS Algorithm Using Original Cordic Rotation

    The LMS algorithm is one of the most successful adaptive filtering algorithms. It uses the instantaneous value of the square of the error signal as an estimate of the Mean-Square Error (MSE). The LMS algorithm changes (adapts) the filter tap weights so that the error signal is minimized in the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    Equivalence of SQL Queries In Presence of Embedded Dependencies

    The authors consider the problem of finding equivalent minimal size reformulations of SQL queries in presence of embedded dependencies. The focus is on Select-Project-Join (SPJ) queries with equality comparisons, also known as safe Conjunctive (CQ) Queries, possibly with grouping and aggregation. For SPJ queries, the semantics of the SQL standard...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    Algebraic Pseudorandom Functions With Improved Efficiency From the Augmented Cascade

    The authors construct an algebraic PseudoRandom Function (PRF) that is more efficient than the classic Naor-Reingold algebraic PRF. The PRF is the result of adapting the cascade construction, which is the basis of HMAC, to the algebraic settings. To do so they define an augmented cascade and prove it secure...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2009

    Decomposing a Scene Into Geometric and Semantically Consistent Regions

    High-level, or holistic, scene understanding involves reasoning about objects, regions, and the 3D relationships between them. This requires a representation above the level of pixels that can be endowed with high-level attributes such as class of object/region, its orientation, and (rough 3D) location within the scene. Towards this goal, the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    NS2 & Networking Using Desktop Virtualization: An Application of Virtual Box

    Information technology has dominated almost all the areas of human life now. Education is not exception in this. How to utilize the technology for imparting the education effectively and efficiently is more important rather than just using the technology. Often users must access applications in Operating System (OS) environments other...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Characteristics of Network Delays in Wide Area File Transfers

    In this paper, the authors present an analysis of over 236,000 file transfers between 10 widely distributed Internet hosts. The goal of this paper is to broaden the understanding of how network path and congestion properties contribute to delays in TCP file transfers. The first part of the analysis investigates...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Emerson: Scripting for Federated Virtual Worlds

    The authors introduce Emerson, a scripting language for virtual worlds that are seamless, scalable, and federated. These worlds present a number of unique challenges. Most importantly, scripts that specify the behavior of the world are distributed across many hosts and users may generate and host scripts. These constraints imply features...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    Identifying Energy Waste Through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring

    PowerNet is a hybrid sensor network for monitoring the power and utilization of computing systems in a large academic building. PowerNet comprises approximately 140 single-plug wired and wireless hardware power meters and 23 software sensors that monitor PCs, laptops, network switches, servers, LCD screens, and other office equipment. PowerNet has...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Corporate Credit Spreads Under Parameter Uncertainty

    In this paper, the authors examine the impact of parameter uncertainty on corporate bond credit spreads. Using data for 5,300 firm-years between 1994 and 2008, they find that parameter uncertainty explains up to 40% of the credit spread that is typically attributed to liquidity, taxes and jump risk, without significantly...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    CDE: Using System Call Interposition to Automatically Create Portable Software Packages

    It can be painfully difficult to take software that runs on one person's machine and get it to run on another machine. Online forums and mailing lists are filled with discussions of users' troubles with compiling, installing, and configuring software and their myriad of dependencies. To eliminate this dependency problem,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2010

    Rehearse: Helping Programmers Adapt Examples by Visualizing Execution and Highlighting Related Code

    Instructive example code is a central part of programming. Web search enables programmers to quickly locate relevant examples. However, existing code editors offer little support for helping users interactively explore examples. This paper proposes that effective use of examples hinges on the programmer's ability to quickly identify a small number...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Data Leakage Detection

    In a perfect world there would be no need to hand over sensitive data to agents that may unknowingly or maliciously leak it. And even if one had to hand over sensitive data, in a perfect world one could watermark each object so that one could trace its origins with...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Reallocating Innovative Resources Around Growth Bottlenecks

    Economy-wide increasing returns to scale embodied in a General Purpose Technology (GPT) and its applications are often a key source of long-run growth. Yet the successful exploitation of increasing returns calls for coordination on a particular technological direction, reducing flexibility and choice ex post and potentially creating a growth bottleneck....

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    Conversational Databases: Explaining Structured Queries to Users

    Many applications offer a form-based environment for naive users for accessing databases without being familiar with the database schema or a structured query language. Do-It-Yourself, database-driven web application platforms empower non-programmers to rapidly create applications. User's interactions are translated to structured queries and executed. However, as a user is unlikely...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Leadership: A Personnel Economics Approach

    A theory of leadership is proposed and tested. Leaders are characterized as those who have the ability to choose the right direction more frequently than their peers. The theory implies that leaders tend to be more able, place themselves in visible decision making situations more frequently, and are generalists. Also,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2010

    Bankruptcy As Implicit Health Insurance

    This paper examines the interaction between health insurance and the implicit insurance that people have because they can file (or threaten to file) for bankruptcy. With a simple model that captures key institutional features, the author demonstrates that the financial risk from medical shocks is capped by the assets that...

    Provided By Stanford University