Stanford University

Displaying 321-360 of 718 results

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Relieving the Data Acquisition Bottleneck in Word Sense Disambiguation

    Supervised learning methods for WSD yield better performance than unsupervised methods. Yet the availability of clean training data for the former is still a severe challenge. This paper presents an unsupervised bootstrapping approach for WSD which exploits huge amounts of automatically generated noisy data for training within a supervised learning...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Switch Scheduling Via Randomized Edge Coloring

    The essence of an Internet router is an n x n switch which routes packets from input to output ports. Such a switch can be viewed as a bipartite graph with the input and output ports as the two vertex sets. Packets arriving at input port i and destined for...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Tenet: An Architecture for Tiered Embedded Networks

    Future large-scale sensor network deployments will be tiered, with the motes providing dense sensing and a higher tier of 32-bit master nodes with more powerful radios providing increased overall network capacity. This paper describes a functional architecture for wireless sensor networks that leverages this structure to simplify the overall system....

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    An Architecture for Content Routing Support in the Internet

    The primary use of the Internet is content distribution the delivery of web pages, audio, and video to client applications yet the Internet was never architected for scalable content delivery. The result has been a proliferation of proprietary protocols and ad hoc mechanisms to meet growing content demand. In this...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    DAML-S: Web Service Description for the Semantic Web

    This paper presents DAML-S, DAML + OIL ontology for describing the properties and capabilities of Web Services. Web Services Web-accessible programs and devices - are garnering a great deal of interest from industry, and standards are emerging for low-level descriptions of Web Services. DAML-S complements this effort by providing Web...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Crawler-Friendly Web Servers

    A web crawler is a program that automatically downloads pages from the Web. A typical crawler starts with a seed set of pages (e.g., yahoo.com and aol.com). It then downloads these pages, extracts hyperlinks and crawls pages pointed to by these new hyperlinks. The crawler repeats this step until there...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Case For Stakeholder Engagement

    This paper explores the experiences of the Davis Foundation and other grantmakers as they work more closely with important stakeholders, and the benefits that this engagement brings to grantmakers, grantees, and the communities they both serve. The benefits that come from engagement are many, including developing a deeper understanding of...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Social Pressures Affect Corporate Strategy And Performance

    Greater social pressure can result in better social performance. In other words, firms step up responsible behavior in response to pressure. Nike became an industry leader in promoting better working conditions in apparel and footwear factories in Asia and elsewhere after activists made the company a prominent target in the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Building Sustainable Organizations: The Human Factor

    Although most of the research and public pressure concerning sustainability has been focused on the effects of business and organizational activity on the physical environment, companies and their management practices profoundly affect the human and social environment as well. This paper briefly reviews the literature on the direct and indirect...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Policy Perspectives On OTC Derivatives Market Infrastructure

    In the wake of the recent financial crisis, Over-The-Counter (OTC) derivatives have been blamed for increasing systemic risk. Although OTC derivatives were not a central cause of the crisis, the complexity and limited transparency of the market reinforced the potential for excessive risk-taking, as regulators did not have a clear...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    All Entrepreneurship Is Social

    Over the past decade or so, the term social entrepreneur has become a fashionable way of describing individuals and organizations that, in their attempts at large-scale change, blur the traditional boundaries between the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Given the ceaseless appearance of innovations and new institutional forms, we should welcome...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    A Modular Correctness Proof of IEEE 802.11i and SSL/TLS

    When networks are required to have mutual authentication between network access point and user devices, the IEEE 802.11i wireless networking protocol is often put to use. This authentication is usually provided before user connectivity and it comprises several parts such as an 802.1X authentication phase, allowing TLS over EAP, the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Beating The Crowd At Picking Stocks

    Charles Lee's portfolio management style requires accounting for human biases to nudge prices closer to their real value. By now, the fallout from the epic financial crisis is both familiar and tangible: foreclosed mortgages, failed banks, lost jobs, recession. On the less tangible side, the meltdown also shook faith in...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Outsourcing May Hurt Fashion Manufacturers' Bottom Line

    Fast fashion-designing products that capture the latest consumer trends, and then spending extra money to get them to market quickly, can be well worth the extra expense, increasing profits exponentially, says Stanford Graduate School of Business Professor Robert Swinney, coauthor of a recent study. Most companies in the fashion industry...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Services Market Is Key To Open Source Software

    Open source software has become a major and fast-growing presence in the computer industry in recent years. Professor Tunay Tunca of Stanford Graduate School of Business and his co-authors argue that the key factor in whether to create open source software is the strength of the market for support, integration,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Sales Simulator Throws Curveballs To Students

    Sloan Fellow Jonathan Solomon has renewed sympathy for sales managers - particularly those he used to employ. That's because he took a Business School elective titled Building and Managing Professional Sales Organizations, a class that simulates the world of selling portable ultrasound devices. "I used to crush the VP of...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Ground Station Virtualization

    This paper discusses the application of the end-to-end principle to ground station systems. It states that lower layers of systems should support the widest possible variety of services and functions. This is applied to ground stations to derive a core set of services that are used across multiple missions while...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Single-Source Stochastic Routing

    This paper introduces and studies the following model for routing un-certain demands through a network. The authors are given a capacitated multicommodity flow network with a single source and multiple sinks, and demands that have known values but unknown sizes. The authors assume that the sizes of demands are governed...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Information Flow Based Messaging Middleware for Building Loosely Coupled Distributed Applications

    Messaging middleware supports the integration of distributed components of an application by collecting messages from information producers and disseminating applicable messages to interested information consumers. This paper present a flexible new model, the Information Flow Graph (IFG), for specifying and implementing the flow of information in a messaging application. The...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Increased-Liability Equity: A Proposal To Improve Capital Regulation Of Large Financial Institutions

    While it is recognized that the high degree of leverage used by financial institutions creates systemic risks and other negative externalities, many argue that financial institutions must rely on extensive debt financing since equity financing is "Expensive." Some of the reasons debt is attractive to financial institutions, such as tax...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Reserve Prices In Internet Advertising Auctions: A Field Experiment

    The author presents the results of a large field experiment on setting reserve prices in auctions for online advertisements, guided by the theory of optimal auction design suitably adapted to the sponsored search setting. Consistent with the theory, following the introduction of new reserve prices revenues in these auctions have...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Using Strategy Objectives for Network Security Analysis

    The anticipation game framework is an extension of attack graphs based on game theory. It is used to anticipate and analyze intruder and administrator concurrent interactions with the network. Like attack-graph-based model checking, the goal of an anticipation game is to prove that a safety property holds. However using this...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Learning 3D Point Cloud Histograms

    In this paper the authors show how using histograms based on the angular relationships between a subset of point normals in a 3D point Cloud can be used in a machine learning algorithm in order to recognize different classes of objects given by the 3D point clouds. This approach extends...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Unifying Packet and Circuit Switched Networks With OpenFlow

    There have been many attempts to unify the control and management of circuit and packet switched networks, but none have taken hold. This paper proposes a simple way to unify both types of network using OpenFlow. The basic idea is that a simple flow abstraction fits well with both types...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Efficient Topologies for Large-Scale Cluster Networks

    Increasing integrated-circuit pin bandwidth has motivated a corresponding increase in the degree or radix of interconnection networks and their routers. This paper describes the flattened butterfly, a cost-efficient topology for high-radix networks. On benign (load-balanced) traffic, the flattened butterfly approaches the cost/performance of a butterfly network and has roughly half...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    The Case for RAMClouds: Scalable High-Performance Storage Entirely in DRAM

    Disk-oriented approaches to online storage are becoming increasingly problematic: they do not scale gracefully to meet the needs of large-scale Web applications, and improvements in disk capacity have far outstripped improvements in access latency and bandwidth. This paper argues for a new approach to datacenter storage called RAMCloud, where information...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    Packet and Circuit Network Convergence With OpenFlow

    Wide area networks are expensive to own from a service provider perspective and it is widely understood that much of this cost is in operational expenses. However, service providers such as AT&T and Verizon are obliged to own and operate two distinct networks for IP and Transport. These networks are...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    Hard Data on Soft Errors: A Large-Scale Assessment of Real-World Error Rates in GPGPU

    Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are gaining widespread use in computational chemistry and other scientific simulation contexts because of their huge performance advantages relative to conventional CPUs. However, the reliability of GPUs in error-intolerant applications is largely unproven. In particular, a lack of Error Checking and Correcting (ECC) capability in the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    XCS: Cross Channel Scripting and Its Impact on Web Applications

    The authors study the security of embedded web servers used in consumer electronic devices, such as security cameras and photo frames, and for IT infrastructure, such as wireless access points and lights-out management systems. All the devices the authors examine turn out to be vulnerable to a variety of web...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2009

    An Entrepreneur's Checklist

    No matter what business vertical you're entering, serial entrepreneur Steve Blank outlines a few points of necessary focus for the emerging business start-up, including market opportunity, market regulations and distribution, competitors and complimentors, and technology breakthroughs. He notes that the customer is not always the same thing as the payer,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2009

    Market Risk And Technology Risk

    Market risk is the concern that you'll find your customers before you run out of funding. A technical risk asks if the innovation is in place to bring your start-up idea to market successfully. Both of these concerns are paramount for an entrepreneurial venture, says serial entrepreneur Steve Blank, and...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2009

    Is First-To-Market Best?

    Why is it a bad idea to be the first and only player in a market? Steve Blank, serial entrepreneur, outlines a host of reasons, including limited market opportunity, the expense of defining a new market, and the positioning risk involved in setting the market standard. Blank cautions that it...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2009

    Vertical Vs. Horizontal Markets

    In this webcast, the difference between vertical markets - niche players serving a specific need or customer set; and horizontal markets - goods or services that enable a platitude of businesses - are defined for the student of entrepreneurship. The needs of start-ups differ dramatically by vertical, says serial entrepreneur...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    Multiple Description Coding of Discrete Ergodic Sources

    The authors investigate the problem of Multiple Description (MD) coding of discrete ergodic processes. They introduce the notion of MD stationary coding, and characterize its relationship to the conventional block MD coding. In stationary coding, in addition to the two rate constraints normally considered in the MD problem, they consider...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2009

    Soliciting Fan-Base Feedback

    Waiting for the right deal, rather than the merchandizing deal at-hand, is a trade-off that artist/entrepreneur Chamillionaire is willing to wait for, with a keen eye toward authenticity at every turn. Quincy Jones III adds that a successful musical artist product roll-out requires thinking across multiple platforms and multiple media....

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2009

    Anyone Can Be An Entrepreneur

    Artists Quincy Jones III and Chamilionaire discuss the myriad ways that online media and technology have leveled the playing field for "e-hustling", or the pursuit of entrepreneurship. Jones equates the Internet to the turntable when it comes to its thumbprint on hip-hop culture, whereas Chamillionaire extols Twitter as a frighteningly...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Nov 2009

    Changing The World through Innovation

    Stanford President John Hennessy kicks off the 2009 Global Innovation Tournament by challenging students to solve the world's major problems through innovation.

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Podcasts // Nov 2009

    Successful Independent Promotion: From Artist To Entrepreneur

    Hip-hop artists Quincy Jones III and Chamillionaire discuss mastering the business side of the music industry. Keeping up with cutting-edge technologies, production logistics, and finding creative ways to gain direct audience contact are essential tactics for the self-produced artist in the digital age.

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    An Antitrust Analysis of the Case for Wireless Network Neutrality

    The ongoing debate about possible implementation of regulatory rules requiring "Network Neutrality" for wireless telecommunications services is inherently about whether to impose prohibitions on the ability of network operators to control their vertical relationships. Antitrust analysis is well suited to analyze whether a wireless network neutrality rule is socially beneficial....

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    Nonparametric Estimation Of Marketing-Mix Effects Using A Regression Discontinuity Design

    We discuss how regression discontinuity designs arise naturally in settings where firms target marketing activity at consumers, and discuss how this aspect may be exploited for econometric inference of causal effects of marketing effort. The papers main insight is to use commonly observed discreteness and kinks in the heuristics by...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2008

    Cost Of Capital And Earnings Transparency

    The authors provide evidence that firms with more transparent earnings enjoy a lower cost of capital. They develop an earnings transparency measure that captures cross-sectional and intertemporal variation in the extent to which earnings and change in earnings covary contemporaneously with stock returns. They find that firms with more transparent...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2008

    Explaining Supplier Behavior On Global Account Management

    Using globalization and contingency theory, this paper develops a supplier-based model of Global Account Management (GAM). The model comprises the multinational supplier's industry globalization drivers, the multinational customers' extent of globally coordinated buying, such customers' demand for GAM services, the supplier's response in terms of using various aspects of GAM,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2009

    Selling Vs. Selling Out

    The real question is not whether social investing will become real, or whether it will become a more important asset class. Social investment is growing, and its growth is in line with societal trends that are both on the rise in their acceptance and in line with the realities of...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2009

    "The Time Vs. Money Effect": Shifting Product Attitudes And Decisions Through Personal Connection

    The results of five field and laboratory experiments reveal a "Time versus money effect" whereby activating time (vs. money) leads to a favorable shift in product attitudes and decisions. Because time increases focus on product experience, activating time (vs. money) augments one's personal connection with the product, thereby boosting attitudes...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Two Roads To Updating Brand Personality Impressions: Trait Versus Evaluative Inferencing

    This paper examines the dynamic process of inference updating. The authors present a framework that delineates two mechanisms that guide the updating of personality trait inferences about brands. The results of three experiments show that chronics (those for whom the trait is accessible) update their initial inferences on the basis...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2008

    Rating The Ratings: How Good Are Commercial Governance Ratings?

    Proxy advisory and corporate governance rating firms play an increasingly important role in U.S. public markets. Proxy advisory firms provide voting recommendations to shareholders on proxy proposals and sometimes take an active role persuading management to change governance arrangements. Corporate governance rating firms provide indices to evaluate the effectiveness of...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2010

    Certified Lies: Detecting And Defeating Government Interception Attacks Against SSL

    This paper introduces compelled certificate creation attack, in which government agencies may compel a certificate authority to issue false SSL certificates that can be used by intelligence agencies to covertly intercept and hijack individuals' secure Web-based communications. Although, no direct evidences are available that this form of active surveillance is...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    An Improved Method For The Quantitative Assessment Of Customer Priorities

    A number of marketing contexts require the quantitative assessment of customer priorities like - Consider the introduction of a newer version of a product, or consider enhancing a service such as a hotel or a airline. The focus in this paper is on measuring the importance's (or values) customers attach...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    The Stock Market's Pricing Of Customer Satisfaction

    A number of recent marketing studies examine the stock market's response to the release of American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) scores. The broad purpose of these studies is to investigate the stock market's valuation of customer satisfaction. However, a key focus is on whether customer satisfaction information predicts long-run returns....

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Building Sustainable Organizations: The Human Factor

    Although most of the research and public pressure concerning sustainability has been focused on the effects of business and organizational activity on the physical environment, companies and their management practices profoundly affect the human and social environment as well. This paper briefly reviews the literature on the direct and indirect...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Policy Perspectives On OTC Derivatives Market Infrastructure

    In the wake of the recent financial crisis, Over-The-Counter (OTC) derivatives have been blamed for increasing systemic risk. Although OTC derivatives were not a central cause of the crisis, the complexity and limited transparency of the market reinforced the potential for excessive risk-taking, as regulators did not have a clear...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2009

    The Time Vs. Money Effect: Shifting Product Attitudes And Decisions Through Personal Connection

    The results of five field and laboratory experiments reveal a "Time vs. money effect" whereby activating time (vs. money) leads to a favorable shift in product attitudes and decisions. Because time increases focus on product experience, activating time (vs. money) augments one's personal connection with the product, thereby boosting attitudes...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Increased-Liability Equity: A Proposal To Improve Capital Regulation Of Large Financial Institutions

    While it is recognized that the high degree of leverage used by financial institutions creates systemic risks and other negative externalities, many argue that financial institutions must rely on extensive debt financing since equity financing is "Expensive." Some of the reasons debt is attractive to financial institutions, such as tax...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2009

    Information Aggregation In Dynamic Markets With Strategic Traders

    This paper studies information aggregation in dynamic markets with a finite number of partially informed strategic traders. It shows that for a broad class of securities, information in such markets always gets aggregated. Trading takes place in a bounded time interval, and in every equilibrium, as time approaches the end...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2010

    A Comparative Analysis Of Strategies And Strategy-Making In The U.S. And China

    The comparative studies indicate that change toward adoption of the electric car and clean coal within the U.S. and China, as well as transnational change toward developing clean energy and reducing global warming, is likely to be slower than many would wish. While it is frustrating to have to come...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2009

    Organizational Ambidexterity: IBM And Emerging Business Opportunities

    The empirical evidence is that only a tiny fraction of organizations live to age 40. Why this should be is a puzzle, since when firms are doing well they have all the resources (financial, physical, and intellectual) to continue to be successful. Yet the evidence is that most organizations fail....

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2010

    Performance-Based Incentives For Internal Monitors

    This study examines the use of performance-based incentives for internal monitors (general counsel and chief internal auditor) and whether these incentives impair monitors' independence by aligning their interests with the interests of those being monitored. Some evidences found that incentives are greater when monitors' job duties contribute more to the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    "Green Shoots" For New Philanthropic Forms

    There are two kinds of philanthropy products: financial products and information products. They used to be bundled together, in the form of foundation staff, personal advisors, or community foundation program officers. In these forms a donor got both services - a place to manage the financial assets that fueled their...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2009

    Generations Converge At The Intersection Of Money And Meaning

    The social capital markets are convening at the intersection of money and meaning. Sometimes that intersection acts like an asset class, and sometimes it shows up more as a movement driven by a passionate desire to get more out of the professional part of life than the exchange that traditional...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2009

    Social Entrepreneurship Revisited

    Social entrepreneurship is one of the most alluring terms on the problem-solving landscape today, and is in use even in the new Obama administration. The President is quite familiar with the term and has embraced a first-of-its-kind investment fund for social entrepreneurship. The question is not whether social entrepreneurship is...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    All Entrepreneurship Is Social

    Over the past decade or so, the term social entrepreneur has become a fashionable way of describing individuals and organizations that, in their attempts at large-scale change, blur the traditional boundaries between the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Given the ceaseless appearance of innovations and new institutional forms, we should welcome...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    Enhancing Business Education For Rural Entrepreneurs

    PDA is a micro lender that provides villagers with loans free of the stringent collateral requirements of traditional banks. It also requires loan seekers to participate in a comprehensive education and mentoring program to help grow their businesses into profitable enterprises. The teacher guides a discussion about the two approaches...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Oct 2008

    Diversity In Innovation

    The low-hanging fruit of problem-solving has been plucked, says Judy Estrin, CEO of JLABS, and the remaining modern challenges are so complex, they can only be solved by a group effort. Teams working toward innovation not only require talent, but also a genuine blend of cognitive diversity - members with...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Oct 2008

    Beyond Socially Responsible Business

    Any "ism" is an extreme and dangerous thing, says William McDonough, McDonough + Partners. And finding that balance between capitalism, socialism, and ecologism is the engineering of good design and sustainable development. Using a mathematical fractal paradigm, in this webcast McDonough puts forth questions that every ecologically- and socially-minded entrepreneur...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // May 2008

    The Three Phases Of Yahoo!

    In the early days of the company, the market was on fire, and global outreach was key. At the turn of the millennium, the company gained strength and began to monetize their web presence. And since 2006, the company has been striving to reorganize and funnel its content around an...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2009

    Trump Yourself - Or The Competition Will

    When you're in the technology industry,... if you're not reinventing yourself, you're just slowly dying, says NVIDIA Co-Founder Jensen Huang. In this webcast, Huang talks about market leaders' need to constantly cannibalize their own products, and how new ideas will force companies to abandon their own technology and processes on...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // May 2008

    Recruiting More .Org's

    Larry Brilliant, Executive Director for Google.org, confesses that the company stole the idea for a profit-driven non-profit from Salesforce.com. Brilliant reminds us that only privately-held companies can give their money to charity, but that Google is optimistic about recruiting other large enterprises to work in the public interest.

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2008

    Bluffing Millions In Financial Backing

    Inspired by Charles Lindberg's Spirit of St. Louis, X PRIZE founder and space entrepreneur Peter Diamandis explains to interviewer George Zachary of Charles River Ventures that offering a high profile cash reward can often be more financially advantageous - and more aggressive in moving forward a societal push - than...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // May 2008

    Graduating New Technologies

    Ninety percent of KPCB's new technologies come from university research, reports partner Beth Seidenberg. But how do the pieces come together? It all may begin with a good idea, but even the most brilliant and innovative technology needs a practical application for building a sustainable entity.

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2010

    How Costly Is Diversity? Affirmative Action In Light Of Gender Differences In Competitiveness

    Affirmative action is often criticized for causing reverse discrimination and lowering the qualifications of those selected under the policy. However the magnitude of such adverse effects depends on whether the best suited candidate is hired absent the policy. Indeed an attraction of affirmative action is that it can compensate for...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Feb 2009

    Seizing The Economic Bull

    The economic depression of early 2009 is a great boon for venture capitalists, and an even better time for aspiring entrepreneurs. So says Tim Draper, Founder and a Managing Director of Draper Fisher Jurvetson, who points out that some of the globe's most dominant brands were initiated during depressions and...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Feb 2009

    Bringing Metrics Into The Daily Routine

    Active users, engagement time, and revenue per user. Every Cooliris employee is issued a toothbrush with reminders of these metrics printed on the back, designed to motivate them to think about how to achieve the company goals as part of the daily routine. All of these metrics are critical yard...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // May 2009

    Case Studies Of Failure

    After designing about a dozen computer products, Numenta's Jeff Hawkins recalls that two - among them the Palm Pilot - were very successful, half were good, and the remaining were market failures. In this webcast, Hawkins discusses his thinking behind some of his product flops. He also tells the story...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Sep 2009

    The Lean Startup: Debunking Myths Of Entrepreneurship

    A startup is not a "Doll house" version of a larger enterprise. It's a human institution trying to start something new under extreme conditions of uncertainty, says author Eric Ries. It's not that some founders have better ideas than others, and this is what dictates success. What differentiates a successfully...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2009

    Scaling Vision, Products, And Yourself

    What wisdom does Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook COO, pass to the next generation of entrepreneurs and business leaders? The importance of impact, and the necessity for that impact to be scalable. Plan for your operations to entice change with a decreasing marginal cost, and for new ventures to grow legs and...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Oct 2008

    Shaping The Future With Entrepreneurship

    Vinod Khosla, founder of Khosla Ventures, predicted that the emergence of free long distance phone calls would be free, and that the large telecoms' reliance on those profits would make them fall like a deck of phone cards. But Khosla also uses this turn of events as a case study...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Apr 2010

    Are Business Plans A Work Of Fiction?

    Can one truly develop a business plan before having a product or a customer in-hand? Not very successfully, contends KPCB partner Randy Komisar. In this webcast, Komisar discusses the premise for his book, Getting to Plan B, in which he points out how often the theory of a start-up succumbs...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Oct 2008

    The Benefits Of Constructive Failure

    Nobody wants to fail, but we need to be willing to take that plunge - and self-analyze to learn from our failures, says JLABS CEO Judy Estrin. If not given the opportunity to fall short of new goals, engineers and thinkers will be incapable of setting their sights high. Luckily...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // Feb 2009

    Take A Chance At The Edge Of Innovation

    Universities and research labs force people to live on the edge of technology, says John Hennessy, President of Stanford University. And this exploration, he points out, helps them to uncover that which is not obvious. Hennessy recalls a case study to prove his point. Thinking back to his first interaction...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // May 2009

    Historical And Global Change Through Clean Technology

    With the long-term health of the planet at risk and the history of alternative energies in the making, Steve Westly, former CFO for the state of California and founder of VC firm The Westly Group, challenges students and entrepreneurs to leave their hand print on the changing shape of the...

    Provided By Stanford University