Stanford University

Displaying 1-40 of 517 results

  • White Papers // Sep 2014

    Password Managers: Attacks and Defenses

    The authors study the security of popular password managers and their policies on automatically filling in web passwords. They examine browser built-in password managers, mobile password managers, and 3rd party managers. They observe significant differences in auto fill policies among password managers. Several auto fill policies can lead to disastrous...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2014

    An Experimental Study of TLS Forward Secrecy Deployments

    Forward secrecy guarantees that eavesdroppers simply cannot reveal secret data of past communications. While many TLS servers have deployed the ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (DH) key exchange to support forward secrecy, most sites use weak DH parameters resulting in a false sense of security. In this paper, the authors surveyed a total...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2013

    A Promising Direction for Web Tracking Countermeasures

    Web tracking continues to pose a vexing policy problem. Surveys have repeatedly demonstrated substantial consumer demand for control mechanisms, and policymakers worldwide have pressed for a Do Not Track system that effectuates user preferences. At present, however, consumers are left in the lurch: existing control mechanisms and countermeasures have spotty...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2012

    Channel Capacity Under General Nonuniform Sampling

    This paper develops the fundamental capacity limits of a sampled analog channel under a sub-Nyquist sampling rate constraint. In particular, the authors derive the capacity of sampled analog channels over a general class of time-preserving sampling methods including irregular non-uniform sampling. Their results indicate that the optimal sampling structures extract...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2012

    EyeQ: Practical Network Performance Isolation for the Multi-Tenant Cloud

    The shared multi-tenant nature of the cloud has raised serious concerns about its security and performance for high valued services. Of many shared resources like CPU, memory, etc., the network is pivotal for distributed applications. Benign, or perhaps malicious traffic interference between tenants can cause significant performance degradation that hurts...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2012

    Who Killed My Battery: Analyzing Mobile Browser Energy Consumption

    Despite the growing popularity of mobile web browsing, the energy consumed by a phone browser while surfing the web is poorly understood. The authors present an infrastructure for measuring the precise energy used by a mobile browser to render web pages. They then measure the energy needed to render financial,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2012

    Shannon Meets Nyquist: Capacity Limits of Sampled Analog Channels

    The authors explore two fundamental questions at the intersection of sampling theory and information theory: how is channel capacity affected by sampling below the channel's Nyquist rate, and what sub-Nyquist sampling strategy should be employed to maximize capacity. In particular, they first derive the capacity of sampled analog channels for...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2012

    Synthesis for Optimal Two-Player Decentralized Control Over TCP Erasure Channels With State Feedback

    Recent advances in communication networks and VLSI have made it possible to provide services remotely. In fact, an increasing number of current services and future deployments, such as distributed database management, grid computing, and the smart grid, are now being built over the cloud, making it inevitable that the control,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2012

    Coding Strategies for a Class of Decentralized Control Problems With Limited Communication

    The authors propose a large class of decentralized control problems with non-classical information structure for which a coding strategy is optimal. This class is a generalized version of the hats problem with statistically dependent hat colors where implicit communication via action is allowed. They propose a sufficient condition on the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Optimal Cooperative Control of Dynamically Decoupled Systems

    The authors consider optimal cooperative control problems where multiple dynamically decoupled players cooperate to optimize a coupled objective under limited communication between each player. They present the explicit optimal control in terms of the solutions to a series of Riccati equations, therefore it can be computed in a distributed manner...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Achievable Error Exponents in the Gaussian Channel With Rate-Limited Feedback

    The authors investigate the achievable error probability in communication over an AWGN discrete time memoryless channel with noiseless delay-less rate-limited feedback. For the case where the feedback rate RFB is lower than the data rate R transmitted over the forward channel, they show that the decay of the probability of...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Identity-Based Encryption Is Secure in the Quantum Random Oracle Model

    The authors give the first proof of security for an identity-based encryption scheme in the quantum random oracle model. This is the first unconditional proof of security for any scheme in this model. Their techniques are quite general and they use them to obtain (unconditional) security proofs for two random...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2012

    Improved Security for Linearly Homomorphic Signatures: A Generic Framework

    The authors propose a general framework that converts (ordinary) signature schemes having certain properties into linearly homomorphic signature schemes, i.e., schemes that allow authentication of linear functions on signed data. The security of the homomorphic scheme follows from the same computational assumption as is used to prove security of the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2012

    Header Space Analysis: Static Checking for Networks

    Today's networks typically carry or deploy dozens of protocols and mechanisms simultaneously such as MPLS, NAT, ACLs and route redistribution. Even when individual protocols function correctly, failures can arise from the complex interactions of their aggregate, requiring network administrators to be masters of detail. The authors' goal is to automatically...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2012

    Less is More: Trading a Little Bandwidth for Ultra-Low Latency in the Data Center

    Traditional measures of network goodness - goodput, quality of service, fairness - are expressed in terms of bandwidth. Network latency has rarely been a primary concern because delivering the highest level of bandwidth essentially entails driving up latency - at the mean and, especially, at the tail. Recently, however, there...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Initial Thoughts on Custom Network Processing Via Waypoint Services

    Network operators want additional functionality from the networks they manage. The current approach to add functionality is to deploy middleboxes. Unfortunately middle-boxes raise concerns regarding robustness, correctness, and efficiency due to their need to be deployed at chokepoints. This paper provides some initial thoughts for solving the middlebox problem in...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    SCD: A Scalable Coherence Directory With Flexible Sharer Set Encoding

    Large-scale CMPs with hundreds of cores require a directory-based protocol to maintain cache coherence. However, previously proposed coherence directories are hard to scale beyond tens of cores, requiring either excessive area or energy, complex hierarchical protocols, or inexact representations of sharer sets that increase coherence traffic and degrade performance. The...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Network Congestion Avoidance Through Speculative Reservation

    Congestion caused by hot-spot traffic can significantly degrade the performance of a computer network. In this paper, the authors present the Speculative Reservation Protocol (SRP), a new network congestion control mechanism that relieves the effect of hot-spot traffic in high bandwidth, low latency, lossless computer networks. Compared to existing congestion...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    A Methodology for Mapping Multiple Use-Cases Onto Networks on Chips

    A communication-centric design approach, Networks on Chips (NoCs), has emerged as the design paradigm for designing a scalable communication infrastructure for future Systems on Chips (SoCs). As technology advances, the number of applications or use-cases integrated on a single chip increases rapidly. The different use-cases of the SoC have different...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Mapping and Configuration Methods for Multi-Use-Case Networks on Chips

    To provide a scalable communication infrastructure for Systems on Chips (SoCs), Networks on Chips (NoCs), a communication centric design paradigm is needed. To be cost effective, SoCs are often programmable and integrate several different applications or use-cases on to the same chip. For the SoC platform to support the different...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    The Role of SNR in Achieving MIMO Rates in Cooperative Systems

    The authors compare the rate of a multiple-antenna relay channel to the capacity of multiple-antenna systems to characterize the cooperative capacity in different SNR regions. While it is known that in the asymptotic regime, at a high SNR or with a large number of cooperating nodes, cooperative systems lack full...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Architectural Support for the Stream Execution Model on General-Purpose Processors

    There has recently been much interest in stream processing, both in industry (e.g., Cell, NVIDIA G80, ATI R580) and academia (e.g., Stanford Merrimac, MIT RAW), with stream programs becoming increasingly popular for both media and more general-purpose computing. Although a special style of programming called stream programming is needed to...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Minimum Expected Distortion in Gaussian Layered Broadcast Coding With Successive Refinement

    A transmitter without Channel State Information (CSI) wishes to send a delay-limited Gaussian source over a slowly fading channel. The source is coded in superimposed layers, with each layer successively refining the description in the previous one. The receiver decodes the layers that are supported by the channel realization and...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2012

    Service Differentiation in the Internet to Support Multimedia Traffic

    The current best-effort infrastructure in the Internet lacks key characteristics in terms of delay, jitter, and loss, which are required for multimedia applications (voice, video, and data). Recently, significant progress has been made toward specifying the service differentiation to be provided in the Internet for supporting multimedia applications. In this...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2011

    Efficient Parallel Graph Exploration on Multi-Core CPU and GPU

    Graphs are a fundamental data representation that have been used extensively in various domains. In graph-based applications, a systematic exploration of the graph such as a Breadth-First Search (BFS) often serves as a key component in the processing of their massive data sets. In this paper, the authors present a...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2011

    Reduced-Dimension Multiuser Detection

    The authors present a Reduced-Dimension MultiUser Detector (RD-MUD) structure that significantly decreases the number of required correlation branches at the receiver front-end, while still achieving performance similar to that of the conventional Matched-Filter (MF) bank. RD-MUD exploits the fact that the number of active users is typically small relative to...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2011

    An Explicit Solution for Optimal Two-Player Decentralized Control Over TCP Erasure Channels With State Feedback

    The authors develop an optimal controller synthesis algorithm for decentralized control problems where control actions are transmitted through TCP-like erasure channels. They consider a simple two-player interconnected linear system and Bernoulli distributed erasure channels. They recast the problem to a centralized Partially Observed Markov Decision Process (POMDP) under the fictitious...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    Decoupling Datacenter Studies From Access to Large-Scale Applications: A Modeling Approach for Storage Workloads

    The cost and power impact of suboptimal storage configurations is significant in DataCenters (DCs) as inefficiencies are aggregated over several thousand servers and represent considerable losses in capital and operating costs. Designing performance, power and cost-optimized systems requires a deep understanding of target workloads, and mechanisms to effectively model different...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2011

    Micro-Interactions With NFC-Enabled Mobile Phones

    This paper coins the term micro-interactions to refer to the class of small exchanges between devices that occur almost instantaneously. For example, a mobile payment using Near-Field Communication (NFC) is a micro-interaction. The arrival of NFC on smart phones makes possible a wide array of applications using micro-interactions, from sharing...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Buffer Sizing in 802.11 Wireless Mesh Networks

    The authors analyze the problem of buffer sizing for TCP flows in 802.11-based Wireless Mesh Networks. Their objective is to maintain high network utilization while providing low queueing delays. The problem is complicated by the time-varying capacity of the wireless channel as well as the random access mechanism of 802.11...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Dynamic Fine-Grain Scheduling of Pipeline Parallelism

    Scheduling pipeline-parallel programs, defined as a graph of stages that communicate explicitly through queues, is challenging. When the application is regular and the underlying architecture can guarantee predictable execution times, several techniques exist to compute highly optimized static schedules. However, these schedules do not admit run-time load balancing, so variability...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    Black-Box Randomized Reductions in Algorithmic Mechanism Design

    The authors give the first black-box reduction from arbitrary approximation algorithms to truthful approximation mechanisms for a non-trivial class of multi-parameter problems. Specifically, they prove that every welfare-maximization problem that admits an FPTAS and can be encoded as a packing problem also admits a truthful-in-expectation randomized mechanism that is an...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2011

    On the Role of Mobility for Multi-Message Gossip

    In wireless ad hoc or social networks, a variety of scenarios require agents to share their individual information or resources with each other for mutual benefit. A partial list includes file sharing and rumor spreading, distributed computation and parameter estimation, and scheduling and control. Due to the huge centralization overhead...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2011

    Time and Cost-Efficient Modeling and Generation of Large-Scale TPCC/TPCE/TPCH Workloads

    Large-scale TPC workloads are critical for the evaluation of datacenter-scale storage systems. However, these workloads have not been previously characterized, in-depth, and modeled in a DC environment. In this paper, the authors categorize the TPC workloads into storage threads that have unique features and characterize the storage activity of TPCC,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2011

    Uplink Resource Allocation for Frequency Selective Channels and Fractional Power Control in LTE

    The authors consider the allocation of spectral and power resources every subframe (1 ms) on the uplink of the Long Term Evolution (LTE) wideband Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA) cellular network. System bandwidth is divided into multiple sub-bands. The fractional power control to manage interference is allowed to be...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    Targeted Malleability: Homomorphic Encryption for Restricted Computations

    The authors put forward the notion of targeted malleability: given a homomorphic encryption scheme, in various scenarios they would like to restrict the homomorphic computations one can perform on encrypted data. They introduced a precise framework, generalizing the foundational notion of non-malleability introduced by Dolev, Dwork, and Naor (SICOMP '00),...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    Parallelizing Machine Learning - Functionally

    Implementing machine learning algorithms for large data, such as the Web graph and social networks, is challenging. Even though much research has focused on making sequential algorithms more scalable, their running times continue to be prohibitively long. Meanwhile, parallelization remains a formidable challenge for this class of problems, despite frameworks...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // May 2011

    Innovate For America

    The presenter focuses on advancing technology and innovation to unlock national economic growth and prosperity. In this webcast, the presenter challenges students and entrepreneurs to take action now to bring innovation to the healthcare, education and government sectors.

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2011

    Performance Implications of Age-Based Allocation in On-Chip-Networks

    Age-based priority is a common mechanism used to improve the fairness and Quality-of-Service (QoS) characteristics of interconnection networks. Packet age can provide remote network state information that enables routers to service packets in a globally optimal fashion. In the Network-on-Chip (NoC) setting, age-based allocation is implemented by assigning priorities to...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • Webcasts // May 2011

    The Value Of True Partnerships

    The presenters are serial entrepreneurs who believe in the fundamental power of partnerships. Empowered by working in close collaboration for years, these co-founders have started multiple companies including Patagon, Lemon Bank and Bling Nation. In this webcast, the presenters describe the value of over-communication, the decision process in making a...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Vision Paper: Enabling Privacy for the Paranoids

    P3P is a set of standards that allow corporations to declare their privacy policies. Hippocratic Databases have been proposed to implement such policies within a corporation's datastore. From an end-user individual's point of view, both of these rest on an uncomfortable philosophy of trusting corporations to protect his/her privacy. Recent...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Two Can Keep a Secret: A Distributed Architecture for Secure Database Services

    Recent trends towards database outsourcing, as well as concerns and laws governing data privacy, have led to great interest in enabling secure database services. Previous approaches to enabling such a service have been based on data encryption, causing a large overhead in query processing. The authors propose a new, distributed...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2010

    Market Panic On Different Time-Scales

    Cross-sectional signatures of market panic were recently discussed on daily time scales in, extended here to a study of cross-sectional properties of stocks on intraday time scales. The authors confirm specific intraday patterns of dispersion and kurtosis, and find that the correlation across stocks increases in times of panic yielding...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    Software or Hardware: The Future of Green Enterprise Computing

    Over the last few years, interest in "Green computing" has motivated research into energy-saving techniques for enterprise systems, from network proxies and virtual machine migration to the return of thin clients. This paper tries to answer a possibly contentious question: would the authors be better served by the embarrassingly simple...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2009

    Language-Based Isolation of Untrusted JavaScript

    Web sites that incorporate untrusted content may use browser- or language-based methods to keep such content from maliciously altering pages, stealing sensitive information, or causing other harm. The authors study language based methods for filtering and rewriting JavaScript code, using Yahoo! ADSafe and Facebook FBJS as motivating examples. They explain...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    Isolating JavaScript With Filters, Rewriting, and Wrappers

    The authors study methods that allow web sites to safely combine JavaScript from untrusted sources. If implemented properly, filters can prevent dangerous code from loading into the execution environment, while rewriting allows greater expressiveness by inserting run-time checks. Wrapping properties of the execution environment can prevent misuse without requiring changes...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    One Torus to Rule Them All: Multidimensional Queries in P2P Systems

    Peer-to-peer systems enable access to data spread over an extremely large number of machines. Most P2P systems support only simple lookup queries. However, many new applications, such as P2P photo sharing and massively multi-player games, would benefit greatly from support for multi-dimensional range queries. The authors show how such queries...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2011

    NS2 & Networking Using Desktop Virtualization: An Application of Virtual Box

    Information technology has dominated almost all the areas of human life now. Education is not exception in this. How to utilize the technology for imparting the education effectively and efficiently is more important rather than just using the technology. Often users must access applications in Operating System (OS) environments other...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2010

    Bankruptcy As Implicit Health Insurance

    This paper examines the interaction between health insurance and the implicit insurance that people have because they can file (or threaten to file) for bankruptcy. With a simple model that captures key institutional features, the author demonstrates that the financial risk from medical shocks is capped by the assets that...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2011

    Targeted Malleability: Homomorphic Encryption for Restricted Computations

    The authors put forward the notion of targeted malleability: given a homomorphic encryption scheme, in various scenarios they would like to restrict the homomorphic computations one can perform on encrypted data. They introduced a precise framework, generalizing the foundational notion of non-malleability introduced by Dolev, Dwork, and Naor (SICOMP '00),...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2011

    CDE: Using System Call Interposition to Automatically Create Portable Software Packages

    It can be painfully difficult to take software that runs on one person's machine and get it to run on another machine. Online forums and mailing lists are filled with discussions of users' troubles with compiling, installing, and configuring software and their myriad of dependencies. To eliminate this dependency problem,...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2010

    Rehearse: Helping Programmers Adapt Examples by Visualizing Execution and Highlighting Related Code

    Instructive example code is a central part of programming. Web search enables programmers to quickly locate relevant examples. However, existing code editors offer little support for helping users interactively explore examples. This paper proposes that effective use of examples hinges on the programmer's ability to quickly identify a small number...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    Example-Centric Programming: Integrating Web Search Into the Development Environment

    The ready availability of online source code examples has changed the cost structure of programming by example modification. However, current search tools are wholly separate from editing tools. What benefits might be realized by integrating them? This paper describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of Blueprint, a tool that integrates...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Mar 2011

    Efficient Selective Identity-Based Encryption Without Random Oracles

    The authors construct two efficient Identity-Based Encryption (IBE) systems that admit selective-identity security reductions without random oracles in groups equipped with a bilinear map. Selective-identity secure IBE is a slightly weaker security model than the standard security model for IBE. In this model the adversary must commit ahead of time...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Framing Attacks on Smart Phones and Dumb Routers: Tap-Jacking and Geo-Localization Attacks

    While many popular web sites on the Internet use frame busting to defend against clickjacking, very few mobile sites use frame busting. Similarly, few embedded web sites such as those used on home routers use frame busting. In this paper the authors show that framing attacks on mobile sites and...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Busting Frame Busting: A Study of Clickjacking Vulnerabilities on Popular Sites

    Web framing attacks such as clickjacking use iframes to hijack a user's web session. The most common defense, called frame busting, prevents a site from functioning when loaded inside a frame. The authors study frame busting practices for the Alexa Top-500 sites and show that all can be circumvented in...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    Attacking an Obfuscated Cipher by Injecting Faults

    The authors study the strength of certain obfuscation techniques used to protect software from reverse engineering and tampering. They show that some common obfuscation methods can be defeated using a fault injection attack, namely an attack where during program execution an attacker injects errors into the program environment. By observing...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    Kamouflage: Loss-Resistant Password Management

    The authors introduce Kamouflage: a new architecture for building theft-resistant password managers. An attacker who steals a laptop or cell phone with a Kamouflage-based password manager is forced to carry out a considerable amount of online work before obtaining any user credentials. They implemented the proposal as a replacement for...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Symmetric Cryptography in Javascript

    The authors take a systematic approach to developing a symmetric cryptography library in Javascript. They study various strategies for optimizing the code for the Javascript interpreter, and observe that traditional crypto optimization techniques do not apply when implemented in Javascript. They propose a number of optimizations that reduce both running...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    Equivalence of SQL Queries In Presence of Embedded Dependencies

    The authors consider the problem of finding equivalent minimal size reformulations of SQL queries in presence of embedded dependencies. The focus is on Select-Project-Join (SPJ) queries with equality comparisons, also known as safe Conjunctive (CQ) Queries, possibly with grouping and aggregation. For SPJ queries, the semantics of the SQL standard...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Apr 2009

    Comparing Multilateral and Bilateral Exchange Models for Content Distribution

    Users of peer-to-peer systems are often incentivized to contribute their upload capacity in a bilateral manner: downloading is possible in return for uploading to the same peer (e.g., BitTorrent). An alternative is to use multilateral exchange to match user demand for content to available supply at other peers in the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2009

    Cascade Multiterminal Source Coding

    Distributed data collection, such as aggregating measurements in a sensor network, has been investigated from many angles. Various algorithms exist for passing messages to neighbors in order to collect information or compute functions of data. Here the authors join in the investigation of the minimum descriptions needed to quantize and...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    Algebraic Pseudorandom Functions With Improved Efficiency From the Augmented Cascade

    The authors construct an algebraic PseudoRandom Function (PRF) that is more efficient than the classic Naor-Reingold algebraic PRF. The PRF is the result of adapting the cascade construction, which is the basis of HMAC, to the algebraic settings. To do so they define an augmented cascade and prove it secure...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Implementation of the Trigonometric LMS Algorithm Using Original Cordic Rotation

    The LMS algorithm is one of the most successful adaptive filtering algorithms. It uses the instantaneous value of the square of the error signal as an estimate of the Mean-Square Error (MSE). The LMS algorithm changes (adapts) the filter tap weights so that the error signal is minimized in the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2009

    Exploiting Opportunistic Multiuser Detection in Decentralized Multiuser MIMO Systems

    This paper studies the design of a decentralized multiuser multi-antenna (MIMO) system for spectrum sharing over a fixed narrow band, where the coexisting users independently update their transmit covariance matrices for individual transmit-rate maximization via an iterative manner. This design problem was usually investigated in the literature by assuming that...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    Relaying Simultaneous Multicast Messages

    The problem of multicasting multiple messages with the help of a relay, which may also have an independent message of its own to multicast, is considered. As a first step to address this general model, referred to as the compound multiple access channel with a relay (cMACr), the capacity region...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2010

    Tree Histogram Coding for Mobile Image Matching

    For mobile image matching applications, a mobile device captures a query image, extracts descriptive features, and transmits these features wirelessly to a server. The server recognizes the query image by comparing the extracted features to its database and returns information associated with the recognition result. For slow links, query feature...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Building Book Inventories Using Smartphones

    Manual generation of a book inventory is time-consuming and tedious, while deployment of barcode and radio-frequency identification (RFID) management systems is costly and affordable only to large institutions. In this paper, the authors design and implement a mobile book recognition system for conveniently generating an inventory of books by snapping...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jul 2010

    Low-Cost Asset Tracking Using Location-Aware Camera Phones

    Maintaining an accurate and up-to-date inventory of one's assets is a labor-intensive, tedious, and costly operation. To ease this difficult but important task, the authors design and implement a mobile asset tracking system for automatically generating an inventory by snapping photos of the assets with a smartphone. Since smartphones are...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2010

    The Case for Ubiquitous Transport-Level Encryption

    Today, Internet traffic is encrypted only when deemed necessary. Yet modern CPUs could feasibly encrypt most traffic. Moreover, the cost of doing so will only drop over time. TCP-Crypt is a TCP extension designed to make end-to-end encryption of TCP traffic the default, not the exception. To facilitate adoption TCP-Crypt...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    InvisiType: Object-Oriented Security Policies

    Many modern software platforms today, including browsers, middleware server architectures, cell phone operating systems, web application engines, support third-party software extensions. This paper proposes InvisiType, an object-oriented approach that enables platform developers to efficiently enforce fine-grained safety checks on third-party extensions without requiring their cooperation. This allows people to harness...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Aug 2010

    Political Economy Of The Financial Crises In Japan & The United States

    Currently, the United States is suffering from a financial crisis. Japan also struggled with a financial crisis from the late 1990's to the early 2000's. What implications can be drawn from these crisis experiences of the two largest economies in the world? This paper examines, from the viewpoint of political...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Nov 2009

    Packet and Circuit Network Convergence With OpenFlow

    Wide area networks are expensive to own from a service provider perspective and it is widely understood that much of this cost is in operational expenses. However, service providers such as AT&T and Verizon are obliged to own and operate two distinct networks for IP and Transport. These networks are...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    Carving Research Slices Out of Your Production Networks With OpenFlow

    OpenFlow has been demonstrated as a way for researchers to run networking experiments in their production network. Last year, the authors demonstrated how an OpenFlow controller running on NOX could move VMs seamlessly around an OpenFlow network. While OpenFlow has potential to open control of the network, only one researcher...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    OpenRoads: Empowering Research in Mobile Networks

    Many researchers are working on mobility management. Continued innovation and development in this area can naturally be expected. The authors anticipate rapid progress will be made in the areas of handover between different technologies, separation of "Virtual" wireless service providers from the physical infrastructure, lossless handovers and multi-homing solutions. There...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Feb 2010

    Ordered Multisignatures and Identity-Based Sequential Aggregate Signatures, With Applications to Secure Routing

    The authors construct two new multiparty digital signature schemes that allow multiple signers to sequentially produce a compact, fixed-length signature. First, the authors introduce a new primitive that the authors call Ordered MultiSignatures (OMS), which allows signers to attest to a common message as well as the order in which...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Sep 2010

    Generalized Efficiency Bounds in Distributed Resource Allocation

    Game theory is emerging as a popular tool for distributed control of multiagent systems. In order to take advantage of these game theoretic tools the interactions of the autonomous agents must be designed within a game theoretic environment. A central component of this game theoretic design is the assignment of...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // May 2009

    Designing Network Protocols for Good Equilibria

    Designing and deploying a network protocol determines the rules by which end users interact with each other and with the network. The authors consider the problem of designing a protocol to optimize the equilibrium behavior of a network with selfish users. The authors consider network cost sharing games, where the...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Jan 2011

    CMC: A Pragmatic Approach to Model Checking Real Code

    Many system errors do not emerge unless some intricate sequence of events occurs. In practice, this means that most systems have errors that only trigger after days or weeks of execution. Model checking is an effective way to find such subtle errors. It takes a simplified description of the code...

    Provided By Stanford University

  • White Papers // Dec 2009

    Learning 3D Point Cloud Histograms

    In this paper the authors show how using histograms based on the angular relationships between a subset of point normals in a 3D point Cloud can be used in a machine learning algorithm in order to recognize different classes of objects given by the 3D point clouds. This approach extends...

    Provided By Stanford University