University of Chicago (Booth)

Displaying 1-40 of 53 results

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    From Farm To Fork: innovations In The Chicago Food Industry

    The Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship at the University Of Chicago Booth School Of Business and the Chicagoland Entrepreneurial Center (CEC) are pleased to sponsor and present this White Paper, From Farm to Fork: Innovations in the Chicago Food Industry. This paper and a conference by the same name held in...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Understanding The Mechanisms Through Which An In Uential Early Childhood Program Boosted Adult Outcomes James Heckman, Lena Malofeeva, Rodrigo Pinto, and Peter Savelyev

    The Perry Preschool program was a randomized social experiment with long run followup that supplemented the early environments of disadvantaged African Ameri-can children. Evidence from the program is widely used in support of claims of the effectiveness of early childhood intervention programs. The Perry program has been shown to boost...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Jan 2010

    Chicago Booth Podcast: Faculty Panel On Ethics And Wall Street

    Booth faculty members Steve N. Kaplan, Tobias Moskowitz and Luigi Zingales spoke at a Myron Scholes Global Market Forum event sponsored by the Initiative on Global Markets. They offered advice to MBA students about making ethical decisions on the job.

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Changing Nature Of Unemployment: Understanding The Trend Toward Long-Term Joblessness

    Unemployment in the United States rose for 15 years (1968-83) and fell over the next 17 years (1983-2000), with cyclical swings in between. In the 1990s, the unemployment rate fell below 4 percent for the first time since 1969. While overall unemployment levels of the late 1990s were nearly as...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Spin Cycle: Truth And Lies In The Market For News

    Editors and reporters have many different methods by which to shape the facts and vary the impression conveyed by their news stories. Different stories may be based on the same set of facts, but each outlet may convey a radically different version of the same story via selective omission, choice...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    A Phenomenon Of The Market: Stock Market-Based Mergers And Acquisitions

    New research explains who acquires whom, whether payment is made in cash or stock, what valuation consequences arise from mergers, and why there are merger waves. In the late 1990s, the United States and world economies experienced a large wave of mergers and acquisitions, culminating in the bursting of the...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Consumers And Their Satellite Dishes: How Strong Is The Bond?

    A new study shows that cable companies have a greater degree of market power than satellite companies. Home satellite systems provide the only alternative to local cable television companies for most Americans. The number of satellite customers has grown from 400,000 in 1994 to 10 million in 1999, making satellite...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Pack Mentality: A Behavioral Finance View Of Stock Price Comovement

    By looking carefully at data on individual stock prices, it is easy to find many examples of "Comovement"-groups of stocks whose prices tend to move together. For instance, prices of stocks in the same industry tend to move together, as do the prices of small-cap stocks, value stocks, and closed-end...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Gender And Competition: Do Competitive Environments Favor Men More Than Women?

    From evolutionary biology to discrimination to personal preferences, science and society have offered many reasons for why women have not caught up with men in the workforce. New research suggests that part of the answer lies in the different ways men and women react to the incentive of competition. Gender...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Building A High-Tech Neighborhood: What Does It Take To Create The Economic Environment For Entrepreneurship?

    Policymakers around the world have sought to emulate the industrial conditions that gave rise to the Silicon Valley economic dynamo of the 1990s. Although theories about the factors that underlie regional entrepreneurship rates are in abundant supply, there has been little systematic, empirical research to support these theories. New research...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Value Of Control: Protecting Minority Shareholders And Developing Better Financial Markets

    U.S. corporate scandals such as Enron and Tyco have highlighted the fact that insiders enjoy benefits above and beyond those of the average shareholder-the so-called "Private benefits of control." How widespread are these benefits? What effects do they have on the development of a country's securities market? Furthermore, how can...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    How Much are Nonexistent Earnings Worth?: Throwing Away Cash To Report False Earnings

    How much will firms spend to perpetuate accounting fraud? New research indicates that some firms are willing to burn through their cash to inflate their financial statements. Today, accounting fraud remains a topic of concern for businesses, investors, and the government. However, coverage of recent massive accounting frauds in the...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Don't Blame The System: Why Capitalism Must Be Saved From The Capitalists

    Capitalism has always been seen as an instrument for the rich to get richer. A new book turns this view upside down: Capitalism is instead a system that fundamentally benefits everyone, especially the have-nots. The paradox we are suggesting is that true capitalism is very much a threat for the...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The $4 Trillion Question: How To Judge Mutual Fund Managers

    New research suggests that mutual fund managers are best evaluated by looking at the company they keep. Suppose an individual chooses a mutual fund manager with a stellar three-year history and invests all his retirement money with that manager," says Lubos P?stor, an assistant professor at the University of Chicago...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Banner Ads Click With Consumers: Online Advertising For Customer Retention

    Banner advertising helps companies retain customers by bringing them back to a company's Web site faster and encouraging them to spend more. Total spending on Internet advertising now exceeds spending on some traditional media, but despite the quick adoption of online marketing by many firms, remarkably little is known about...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Glass Is Not Broken: Evaluating The State Of U.S. Corporate Governance

    To a casual observer, the United States corporate governance system may seem as if it is beyond repair. New research poses the question: If U.S. corporate governance is so bad, why has performance been so good? For the past two years, enormous media attention has been trained on the alleged...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    What Drives Companies To Repurchase Their Stock?: The Relationship between Employee Stock Options And Stock Repurchases

    In the late 1990s, the use of employee stock options increased dramatically, as did the use of stock repurchases. Both affect a company's earnings per share. New research goes beyond the anecdotes to determine whether financial reporting incentives affect corporate managers' decisions to repurchase their company's stock. While the intricacies...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Junior Must Pay: Privatizing Social Security-Costs Vs. Benefits

    As the baby boomer generation nears retirement age, fixing the U.S. Social Security system becomes an even more pressing issue. New research finds that privatizing Social Security is a risk worth taking. One facet of the larger debate on Social Security reform has been the proposal to invest a modest...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Tainted Knowledge Vs. Tempting Knowledge: Rivalry, Self-Esteem, And Patterns Of Learning

    People want to have positive views of themselves, and organize much of their lives around maintaining, enhancing, and protecting their self-esteem. By simply comparing oneself to more successful rivals, one's self-esteem may become threatened. These comparisons are particularly intense in the business world when rivals are members of the same...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Wireless Revolution: Pioneering Uses Of Information Technology In Trucking

    Wireless networking applications in trucking have yielded significant increases in productivity. The economic value of many applications of Information Technology (IT) rest on the same principles: information improves decision making, and better systems of communication enable people to implement those decisions more efficiently. For every industry, productivity reflects not only...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Beyond The Protestant Work Ethic: Religion And Economic Attitudes

    New research suggests a link between religion and attitudes that are conducive to economic growth. Economists, sociologists, and political scientists have long been interested in explaining the economic success of certain countries and the persistent poverty of others. The first, and most famous example, is the German sociologist Max Weber....

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Save More Tomorrow: A Simple Plan To Increase Retirement Saving

    The Save More Tomorrow plan allows employees to allocate a portion of their future salary increases toward retirement savings. In the past decade, there has been a rapid shift among employers from defined benefit plans to defined contribution plans. As a result, employees now bear much more responsibility for their...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Business Of Managing Decisions: Understanding The Place Of Uncertainty

    If introducing a new product line creates a small probability of losing a few million dollars and a large probability of earning many billions of dollars, it seems clear that the new product line should be introduced. But does what we know about managerial decision making suggest that the new...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Not Beyond Repair: How Organizational Practices Can Compensate For Individual Shortcomings

    More than 30 years of research in cognitive psychology has resulted in rather mixed reviews for human judgment and reasoning. Some researchers have marveled at what the human brain can accomplish. Others have concluded that human reasoning is seriously riddled with flaws, self-serving biases, and shortcomings. How can we explain...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Measuring Media Slant:How Market Forces Influence Newspaper Content

    Political pundits on both sides of the aisle accuse newspapers of maintaining a liberal or conservative bias. New research suggests that newspapers choose their political slant based on what their readers prefer. To develop a measure of political positioning, the authors examined all phrases used by members of Congress in...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    For Richer Or For Poorer: Working Spouses And Labor Inequality

    Since the 1960s, have married women increased their participation in the labor force to compensate for the decline in employment and disappointing earnings growth of their husbands? Are married men working less today because their wives are working more? This paper examines differing levels of men's income, rather than wages...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Cheating Curve: What Are The Costs Of High-Stakes Testing?

    The emphasis placed on standardized tests in elementary and secondary education has been steadily increasing over the past decade. Recent research examines how the pressure to boost test scores can lead to cheating by teachers and administrators. Standardized test scores are designed to provide an objective measure of student achievement....

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Inefficiency Is A Matter Of Perspective: The Limits Of Bureaucracy

    Bureaucracies are widely perceived as inefficient. However, what is considered inefficient in comparison to the private sector may simply be inherent to bureaucracies. A recent study suggests that the solution may involve changing the nature of bureaucratic oversight. According to University of Chicago Graduate School of Business professor Canice Prendergast,...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Working With Pay Pals: Creating Incentive Pay Programs

    Recent research suggests that productivity is substantially higher when employees' monetary incentives are based solely on individual effort. One of the most common incentive programs in American business bases an employee's pay on individual performance as compared to the performance of co-workers. It is believed that this "Relative" incentive system...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Racial Bias In Hiring: Are Emily And Brendan More Employable Than Latisha And Jamal?

    Though racial inequality in the U.S. labor market is understood as a persistent problem even today, it has been difficult to measure how such discrimination works. Do employers actively discriminate against African-American job applicants? Can such discrimination be proven? What is the effect of improved credentials for African-Americans? This study...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Nov 2009

    Chicago Booth Podcast: Household Leverage And The Recession Of 2007 To 2009

    Associate Professor of Finance Amir Sufitalked to students at a Becker Brown Bag Series sponsored by the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory about research that suggests household leverage plays an important role in recessions.

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Oct 2009

    Chicago Booth Podcast: Inflation Or Deflation?

    John H. Cochrane, AQR Capital Management Professor of Finance spoke at a Myron Scholes Global Market Forum event sponsored by the Initiative on Global Markets. He discusses his research on fiscal and monetary policy in 2008 - 09 as he seeks to determine whether the U.S. is headed for a...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Oct 2009

    Chicago Booth Podcast: Market-Based Health Insurance Reform

    AQR Capital Management Professor of Finance John H. Cochrane talked to students at a Becker Brown Bag Series sponsored by the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory about proposed solutions to public policies distorting the health care market.

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Dominant Use: How Customers Influence The Evolution Of New Products

    Paying attention to how customers use a new product can help companies become more successful in the marketplace. How customers use a technology generates important information about its performance, design, and operational characteristics. As customers began to use the automobile in hilly and wet terrains, for example, they learned about...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Neighbor Networks: Understanding The Power Of Networks

    A surprising finding on the value of colleague networks leads to an even more remarkable revelation of how networks truly work. Is it who you know rather than what you know that really matters? People hope that they will be rewarded for their ability and effort, but fear that rewards...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Forums Vs. Fountains: Universities And The Evolution Of Knowledge Networks

    Universities can help boost a mature industrial economy by reinvigorating the flow of new ideas in the community. But universities can approach this task in different ways, each leading to vastly different outcomes. Long before Silicon Valley, cities like Akron, Ohio, and Rochester, New York, were known as America's centers...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    What Should GAAP Look Like? A Survey And Economic Analysis

    Based on extant literature, the authors articulate a positive theory of GAAP under the assumption that the objective is to facilitate the efficient allocation of capital within an economy. The theory predicts that GAAP's principal focus, as shaped by the demand for and supply of financial information, is on the...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Jun 2009

    Chicago Booth Podcast: The Future Of Markets

    In the midst of the worst recession since the 1930s, six Chicago Booth faculty members reexamined the role of government in the economy at a special forum at the 57th annual Management Conference in Chicago. Veteran journalist Ray Suarez moderated the panel.

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    Leveraged Buyouts And Private Equity

    In a leveraged buyout, a company is acquired by a specialized investment firm using a relatively small portion of equity and a relatively large portion of outside debt financing. The leveraged buyout investment firms today refer to themselves (and are generally referred to) as private equity firms. In a typical...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // May 2009

    Chicago Booth Podcast: Why Regulations Must Be Consistent Across Financial And Geographical Borders

    The Vice Chairman of Deutsche Bank's Global Group, Malcom Knight, spoke at a Myron Scholes Global Markets Forum on the need to address regulatory arbitrage across financial and geographical borders.

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Nov 2008

    Is That Car Smiling At Me?:Anthropomorphizing Brands And Products

    Would a car that seems to smile at you make you like it more? Perhaps, but only if a marketer succeeds in making you see the product as human. It could be a face in the clouds or the side of a mountain, or a pair of ducks that seem...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Dominant Use: How Customers Influence The Evolution Of New Products

    Paying attention to how customers use a new product can help companies become more successful in the marketplace. How customers use a technology generates important information about its performance, design, and operational characteristics. As customers began to use the automobile in hilly and wet terrains, for example, they learned about...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2009

    Why I Support A Privatized Individual Account Social Security System

    Republicans and Democrats are passionately arguing about the future of Social Security. Although there is merit in each side's argument, neither side is portraying the situation accurately. In the author's view, movement toward a privatized individual account Social Security system offers the best option, where individuals save and accumulate assets...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Neighbor Networks: Understanding The Power Of Networks

    A surprising finding on the value of colleague networks leads to an even more remarkable revelation of how networks truly work. Is it who you know rather than what you know that really matters? People hope that they will be rewarded for their ability and effort, but fear that rewards...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Changing Nature Of Unemployment: Understanding The Trend Toward Long-Term Joblessness

    Unemployment in the United States rose for 15 years (1968-83) and fell over the next 17 years (1983-2000), with cyclical swings in between. In the 1990s, the unemployment rate fell below 4 percent for the first time since 1969. While overall unemployment levels of the late 1990s were nearly as...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Spin Cycle: Truth And Lies In The Market For News

    Editors and reporters have many different methods by which to shape the facts and vary the impression conveyed by their news stories. Different stories may be based on the same set of facts, but each outlet may convey a radically different version of the same story via selective omission, choice...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Oct 2009

    Forums Vs. Fountains: Universities And The Evolution Of Knowledge Networks

    Universities can help boost a mature industrial economy by reinvigorating the flow of new ideas in the community. But universities can approach this task in different ways, each leading to vastly different outcomes. Long before Silicon Valley, cities like Akron, Ohio, and Rochester, New York, were known as America's centers...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    A Phenomenon Of The Market: Stock Market-Based Mergers And Acquisitions

    New research explains who acquires whom, whether payment is made in cash or stock, what valuation consequences arise from mergers, and why there are merger waves. In the late 1990s, the United States and world economies experienced a large wave of mergers and acquisitions, culminating in the bursting of the...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Consumers And Their Satellite Dishes: How Strong Is The Bond?

    A new study shows that cable companies have a greater degree of market power than satellite companies. Home satellite systems provide the only alternative to local cable television companies for most Americans. The number of satellite customers has grown from 400,000 in 1994 to 10 million in 1999, making satellite...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Pack Mentality: A Behavioral Finance View Of Stock Price Comovement

    By looking carefully at data on individual stock prices, it is easy to find many examples of "Comovement"-groups of stocks whose prices tend to move together. For instance, prices of stocks in the same industry tend to move together, as do the prices of small-cap stocks, value stocks, and closed-end...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Gender And Competition: Do Competitive Environments Favor Men More Than Women?

    From evolutionary biology to discrimination to personal preferences, science and society have offered many reasons for why women have not caught up with men in the workforce. New research suggests that part of the answer lies in the different ways men and women react to the incentive of competition. Gender...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Building A High-Tech Neighborhood: What Does It Take To Create The Economic Environment For Entrepreneurship?

    Policymakers around the world have sought to emulate the industrial conditions that gave rise to the Silicon Valley economic dynamo of the 1990s. Although theories about the factors that underlie regional entrepreneurship rates are in abundant supply, there has been little systematic, empirical research to support these theories. New research...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Value Of Control: Protecting Minority Shareholders And Developing Better Financial Markets

    U.S. corporate scandals such as Enron and Tyco have highlighted the fact that insiders enjoy benefits above and beyond those of the average shareholder-the so-called "Private benefits of control." How widespread are these benefits? What effects do they have on the development of a country's securities market? Furthermore, how can...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    How Much are Nonexistent Earnings Worth?: Throwing Away Cash To Report False Earnings

    How much will firms spend to perpetuate accounting fraud? New research indicates that some firms are willing to burn through their cash to inflate their financial statements. Today, accounting fraud remains a topic of concern for businesses, investors, and the government. However, coverage of recent massive accounting frauds in the...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Don't Blame The System: Why Capitalism Must Be Saved From The Capitalists

    Capitalism has always been seen as an instrument for the rich to get richer. A new book turns this view upside down: Capitalism is instead a system that fundamentally benefits everyone, especially the have-nots. The paradox we are suggesting is that true capitalism is very much a threat for the...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The $4 Trillion Question: How To Judge Mutual Fund Managers

    New research suggests that mutual fund managers are best evaluated by looking at the company they keep. Suppose an individual chooses a mutual fund manager with a stellar three-year history and invests all his retirement money with that manager," says Lubos P?stor, an assistant professor at the University of Chicago...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Banner Ads Click With Consumers: Online Advertising For Customer Retention

    Banner advertising helps companies retain customers by bringing them back to a company's Web site faster and encouraging them to spend more. Total spending on Internet advertising now exceeds spending on some traditional media, but despite the quick adoption of online marketing by many firms, remarkably little is known about...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Glass Is Not Broken: Evaluating The State Of U.S. Corporate Governance

    To a casual observer, the United States corporate governance system may seem as if it is beyond repair. New research poses the question: If U.S. corporate governance is so bad, why has performance been so good? For the past two years, enormous media attention has been trained on the alleged...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    What Drives Companies To Repurchase Their Stock?: The Relationship between Employee Stock Options And Stock Repurchases

    In the late 1990s, the use of employee stock options increased dramatically, as did the use of stock repurchases. Both affect a company's earnings per share. New research goes beyond the anecdotes to determine whether financial reporting incentives affect corporate managers' decisions to repurchase their company's stock. While the intricacies...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Junior Must Pay: Privatizing Social Security-Costs Vs. Benefits

    As the baby boomer generation nears retirement age, fixing the U.S. Social Security system becomes an even more pressing issue. New research finds that privatizing Social Security is a risk worth taking. One facet of the larger debate on Social Security reform has been the proposal to invest a modest...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Tainted Knowledge Vs. Tempting Knowledge: Rivalry, Self-Esteem, And Patterns Of Learning

    People want to have positive views of themselves, and organize much of their lives around maintaining, enhancing, and protecting their self-esteem. By simply comparing oneself to more successful rivals, one's self-esteem may become threatened. These comparisons are particularly intense in the business world when rivals are members of the same...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Wireless Revolution: Pioneering Uses Of Information Technology In Trucking

    Wireless networking applications in trucking have yielded significant increases in productivity. The economic value of many applications of Information Technology (IT) rest on the same principles: information improves decision making, and better systems of communication enable people to implement those decisions more efficiently. For every industry, productivity reflects not only...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Beyond The Protestant Work Ethic: Religion And Economic Attitudes

    New research suggests a link between religion and attitudes that are conducive to economic growth. Economists, sociologists, and political scientists have long been interested in explaining the economic success of certain countries and the persistent poverty of others. The first, and most famous example, is the German sociologist Max Weber....

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Save More Tomorrow: A Simple Plan To Increase Retirement Saving

    The Save More Tomorrow plan allows employees to allocate a portion of their future salary increases toward retirement savings. In the past decade, there has been a rapid shift among employers from defined benefit plans to defined contribution plans. As a result, employees now bear much more responsibility for their...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    The Business Of Managing Decisions: Understanding The Place Of Uncertainty

    If introducing a new product line creates a small probability of losing a few million dollars and a large probability of earning many billions of dollars, it seems clear that the new product line should be introduced. But does what we know about managerial decision making suggest that the new...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Not Beyond Repair: How Organizational Practices Can Compensate For Individual Shortcomings

    More than 30 years of research in cognitive psychology has resulted in rather mixed reviews for human judgment and reasoning. Some researchers have marveled at what the human brain can accomplish. Others have concluded that human reasoning is seriously riddled with flaws, self-serving biases, and shortcomings. How can we explain...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Mar 2009

    What's Advertising Content Worth?: Evidence From A Consumer Credit Marketing Field Experiment

    Firms spend billions of dollars developing advertising content, yet there is little field evidence on how much or how it affects demand. The authors analyze a direct mail field experiment in South Africa implemented by a consumer lender that randomized advertising content, loan price, and loan offer deadlines simultaneously. The...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Feb 2009

    The Economics And Psychology Of Inequality And Human Development

    Recent research on the economics of human development deepens understanding of the origins of inequality and excellence. It draws on and contributes to personality psychology and the psychology of human development. Inequalities in family environments and investments in children are substantial. They causally affect the development of capabilities. Both cognitive...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    Understanding The Mechanisms Through Which An In Uential Early Childhood Program Boosted Adult Outcomes James Heckman, Lena Malofeeva, Rodrigo Pinto, and Peter Savelyev

    The Perry Preschool program was a randomized social experiment with long run followup that supplemented the early environments of disadvantaged African Ameri-can children. Evidence from the program is widely used in support of claims of the effectiveness of early childhood intervention programs. The Perry program has been shown to boost...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Mar 2010

    From Farm To Fork: innovations In The Chicago Food Industry

    The Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship at the University Of Chicago Booth School Of Business and the Chicagoland Entrepreneurial Center (CEC) are pleased to sponsor and present this White Paper, From Farm to Fork: Innovations in the Chicago Food Industry. This paper and a conference by the same name held in...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Mar 2009

    Audit Quality And Auditor Reputation: Evidence From Japan

    At the same time that Japan is holding itself out as a high quality participant in world capital markets, there has been a string of high-profile accounting scandals, including those at Sanyo, Nikko Cordial, Kanebo, and Livedoor. Regulators at the Japanese FSA have reacted strongly to these scandals, arresting auditors...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Sep 2009

    What Should GAAP Look Like? A Survey And Economic Analysis

    Based on extant literature, the authors articulate a positive theory of GAAP under the assumption that the objective is to facilitate the efficient allocation of capital within an economy. The theory predicts that GAAP's principal focus, as shaped by the demand for and supply of financial information, is on the...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jun 2009

    Leveraged Buyouts And Private Equity

    In a leveraged buyout, a company is acquired by a specialized investment firm using a relatively small portion of equity and a relatively large portion of outside debt financing. The leveraged buyout investment firms today refer to themselves (and are generally referred to) as private equity firms. In a typical...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • White Papers // Jan 2010

    Measuring Media Slant:How Market Forces Influence Newspaper Content

    Political pundits on both sides of the aisle accuse newspapers of maintaining a liberal or conservative bias. New research suggests that newspapers choose their political slant based on what their readers prefer. To develop a measure of political positioning, the authors examined all phrases used by members of Congress in...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Jan 2010

    Chicago Booth Podcast: Faculty Panel On Ethics And Wall Street

    Booth faculty members Steve N. Kaplan, Tobias Moskowitz and Luigi Zingales spoke at a Myron Scholes Global Market Forum event sponsored by the Initiative on Global Markets. They offered advice to MBA students about making ethical decisions on the job.

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Oct 2009

    Chicago Booth Podcast: Inflation Or Deflation?

    John H. Cochrane, AQR Capital Management Professor of Finance spoke at a Myron Scholes Global Market Forum event sponsored by the Initiative on Global Markets. He discusses his research on fiscal and monetary policy in 2008 - 09 as he seeks to determine whether the U.S. is headed for a...

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Nov 2009

    Chicago Booth Podcast: Household Leverage And The Recession Of 2007 To 2009

    Associate Professor of Finance Amir Sufitalked to students at a Becker Brown Bag Series sponsored by the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory about research that suggests household leverage plays an important role in recessions.

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Feb 2009

    Chicago Booth Podcast: Should Executive Pay Be Regulated?

    This broadcast features faculty member and former Federal Reserve Governor Randall Kroszner talking about the financial crisis and reform. He discussed his first-hand experiences including the Bear Stearns meltdown at a Global Leadership Series event in London.

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Oct 2009

    Chicago Booth Podcast: Market-Based Health Insurance Reform

    AQR Capital Management Professor of Finance John H. Cochrane talked to students at a Becker Brown Bag Series sponsored by the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory about proposed solutions to public policies distorting the health care market.

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)

  • Podcasts // Jun 2009

    Chicago Booth Podcast: The Future Of Markets

    In the midst of the worst recession since the 1930s, six Chicago Booth faculty members reexamined the role of government in the economy at a special forum at the 57th annual Management Conference in Chicago. Veteran journalist Ray Suarez moderated the panel.

    Provided By University of Chicago (Booth)