Five signs that you aren't cut out to be a CIO

April 29, 2008, 1:27 AM PST | Length: 245


For many IT professionals, the ultimate job in technology is Chief Information Officer (CIO), but do you really know what a CIO does? This episode of Sanity Savers for IT Executives looks at what the CIO job involves and provides five warning signs that you may not be cut out to be a CIO.

Once you've watched the video, you can read the original TechRepublic article, download a PDF version of the article, and read what your peers have to say about this topic in the companion blog post.

6 comments
yemi_adeyinka
yemi_adeyinka

Please can you post the transcript of this video

wbenton0
wbenton0

I was expecting something a bit more high-level. I mean, to me... all five of the things mentioned are absolute musts in my world, but I guess for those "not-in-the-know"... this would be quite useful.

Aaron Mason
Aaron Mason

Hi, What you say about getting a system to a state of rock-solidness is true, though the reasons for doing so, I believe, are misrepresented. Much of the reason for adversity to change is that systems administration isn't a solved problem in computing, and by constantly changing a system, you're robbing yourself and those around you the opportunity for expertise that can only come with time. Constant change can also turn into a security risk as a lack of understanding of a system can mean that crucial security parameters get missed. On the flip side, if such adversity gets in the way of finding out about technologies that can increase the stability, security, availability or otherwise of current systems without having to turning them inside out and relearn them all over again, then it is a problem. It really depends on what sort of technologies you're referring to at the end of the day - those that replace the system are in the scope of the first problem, while those that would improve the system in some way while retaining the same functionality fit the second. That's my $0.02.

Jim from Indy
Jim from Indy

I think the presenter was correct. It's a CIO's job to consider alternatives in every sense of the word... He needs to have an excellent feel for the strategic direction of the company, and explore alternatives that will meet those strategic goals. Since IT change has a long lead time, it's critical for the CIO to be thinking a fair distance in the future. It's critical for his/her subordinate managers to maintain a stable, cost-effective environment and be willing to help the CIO evaluate the cost, impact, risk, and effectiveness of alternatives, no matter how far "out of the box." If you're not comfortable with the notion of exploding everything you're doing and reassembling the parts into a completely different shape, don't apply to be a CIO. You'll get fired and never see it coming.

mrdelurk
mrdelurk

Did you consider the possibility of getting off the XP / Vista / Win7 upgrade treadmill altogether and take the company to (Mac) OSX? We did it, and we're on a roll. We still run XP, as a virtual machine in VMWare for the sake of some legacy software (and employees), but that's about it. Could you handle this much change as a CIO here?