IBM: 'Consumerization' of IT driving cloud adoption

April 29, 2010, 5:46 AM PST | Length: 217


At the Interop conference in Las Vegas, Kristof Kloeckner, CTO of cloud computing at IBM, talks about the big trends in that arena and what that means for enterprise IT. He says the consumerization of IT is driving the expectations of how users access IT services and will lead to the evolution of IT infrastructure.

2 comments
billballew
billballew

Cloud computing is a giant step backward to the days of client server. They tried putting business applications on servers in the early 90's and it failed. Word Perfect and Word ran too slow and was unreliable. We face that again. I for one do not want to be working on a word document and have to download the routine to do spellcheck. capitalization, or printing, etc. I understand the computer companies desire. It was stated succinctly in a convention I attended years ago. "The upward aim is to have money sucked out of the users pocket everytime they click the mouse." This was actually stated to a group of about 3000 people in a Groupware conference in San Jose. We are aleady seeing this happen. MS office no longer comes with Help. Have to be on the internet. Also there are no longer graphics on the install disk. You have to be on the internet. etc. Again, it is a giant step backward to client server with a link to your credit card. AND it just simply sucks!! I predict a rash of people going back to Windows 98 and Open Office so we can have total control..

CG IT
CG IT

because of the monthly cash they stand to take in for providing services rather than providing hardware and software. The biggest proponents of the "Cloud" are the telecoms, who's smart phones and the applications for accessing data rival computers, thus is direct competition with computers. If the IT mfgs don't get into the "Cloud" service arena, the telecoms will cause the demise of the IT industry with their smart phones. As it is, Smart Phones with Internet access is going to cause the IT industry, [those computer hardware mfgs and software makers] to see their multi-billion dollar market drying up to nothing, unless they to get into providing "Cloud" services to fend off the telecoms that are moving into the hardware and software area of providing Information Technology as well as simply providing Internet access. What I don't like about "Cloud" as a consumer is the monthly fees. They rival the telecom fees for cell phone service. In paying almost $100 a month for cell phone service, the cost just doesn't make sense for phone service. Heck, I get 250 TV channels 65 of them in HD, high speed internet access, and digital phone service for that much from my cable TV provider. I for one just want basic cell phone service that doesn't cost more than my monthly food bill cost or mortgage, but like it or not, we the consumers can't get that. Like airlines, you can get a low cost fare, but with all the extra fees that are not waivable, your paying more than what the old pricing structure for full fare prices would be. Cell phone uses have to have a data plan, that costs extra, so that $39.99 per month cell phone plan is now $55.00 per month because you have to pay for a data plan and you have to have a data plan, period. But when the real monthly bill arrives, the cost isn't $55.00 a month, it's $100.00 a month because of the text, internet access, email add on charges that isn't covered under the monthly plan. Those 20 cent extra charges per text, per accessing email, voice mail all add up and there is no lower cost alternative. While government hasn't pass a law that you must buy IT services or pay a penalty at tax time, when software mfgs aren't making software anymore that you can buy, when computer manufacturers aren't making computers, services and parts anymore, businesses and consumers will be forced to pay the monthly fees to those few companies that provide both internet access and the devices to access it.