IT Dojo: Build a complete IT toolkit for go-anywhere tech support

January 16, 2009, 3:41 AM PST | Length: 355


Whether you're traveling across the city or going from one side of the building to the other, there's nothing more irritating than being on a support call and not having the right tools. Since experience is always the best teacher, TechRepublic asked its members for advice in compiling a list of tools for IT support pros, and we received a lot of great feedback. Bill Detwiler goes over a list of items that should be in your IT repair toolkit. Once you’ve watched this IT Dojo video, you can find a link to the original TechRepublic article and print the tip from our IT Dojo Blog.

13 comments
TheGhostTech
TheGhostTech

I like to keep a small notebook for general reference in my bag. I also keep an assortment of common cables (ethernet, powercable, sata\ide, etc. phone cord) I also keep RG-45 crimpers, and jacks with me, just in case.

DrBlake4000
DrBlake4000

Great Video, In addition to those tools mentioned I always carry the following; . Set of electricians precision screwdrivers (Great for opening up laptops) .Set of (Torx/Hex precision screwdrivers) ?Ideal for opening up Blackberry?s and other mobile devices. .Scalpel (For general precision cutting and glue removal) .Plastic case opening tool/Guitar Plectrums (Nothing worse then leaning screwdriver marks all over your customers computers) .Velcro and Standard plastic cable ties (Keeps cable nice at tidy) .Measuring tape (General measuring, great for giving descriptions when sourcing spare parts) .Punch Down (For obvious reasons) .Anti static bag for safely storing components in transit. .Small parts organizer or ice tray ? (you never wont to lose those tiny screws) .Stanley windows scraper ? (everyone one should have one of these! Saves your finger nails when trying to remove those stubborn aluminum asset tags from redundant equipment) .Spare Bios Batteries (Button cell) My kit is very comprehensive and consists of all the things mentioned in the video and more, you might think that I carry too much but honestly it all fits in my small fisherman's style tool box.

TranquileUncle
TranquileUncle

This was a good video with solid advice. I'd include mobile power charger. I use one that has 3 (3 prong outlets) to charge up my laptop when the batteries run low. I also carry cleaning supplies to clear any dust bunnies I come across.

shaun.mccloud
shaun.mccloud

Scissors. Some sharp and strong to remove that twist tie that is always in the way. I found these to be the most common tool I need so I got a set that I keep attached to me keys.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000 moderator

But I do use an old RAM Stick to slit open Tape on Boxes that lives on my keyring. Thought to be perfectly honest I've never thought of that as a Tool but it is very handy none the less. Col

ccalcut
ccalcut

I include a small magnifying glass to look up small serial numbers.

sierra50bob
sierra50bob

Many years ago I installed equipment at military bases. Not sure if this is as much appropriate in today's IT world. But in addition to some of tools you mentioned I had a sodering iron, rubber hoses (to cover wiring that I spliced), cigarette lighter to shrink wrap wiring, a portable vice that attaches to a hard surface,electrical ties, and wire stripper/krimper.

veerh01
veerh01

Hi, i'm missing a very simple, but essential lifesaver: a magnet. You can use it on a screwdrivershaft to pick up fallen screws out of a computercase. Other things to think of (but maybe not as live saving) are things like pci-slot brackets and a can of dust remover spray.

Larry.Barnhill
Larry.Barnhill

A very well thought-out presentation, but where's the link to the text version. I'm about to start a new job in which I will need this, but first I must convince management that the tools are necessary. A text version with pictures would be very helpful.

arsgamer
arsgamer

I have used and like the Victorinox Swiss Army CyberTool 41 It has small pliers, bit driver with 5mm socket for standoffs, Scissors, and a small pen for notes. Flash drives are good to have, but I would recommend a USB 2.0 to SATA + IDE (2.5 / 3.5) Cable Adapter with power.

andypt
andypt

I have a small self illuminating web camera in my kit to read the small numbers and behind objects as I can save the video and any pictures to a sharepoint site to share with my other support staff

HAL 9000
HAL 9000 moderator

On the Lower left hand side of the Video Page you will see a Full transcript of the Video.:) Copy & paste into your Word processor to get a hard copy if requite. Col

ThumbsUp2
ThumbsUp2

Looks like they have a new style for that page. I see a link to the full transcript on the left. Although, ya may not be able to print it. It comes in a pop-up window with no controls and right click doesn't give us a print option.