The five most lucrative certifications for IT leaders

February 25, 2009, 1:39 AM PST | Length: 537


TechRepublic's 2009 IT salary and skills survey has good news for IT pros but also showed the effects of the global recession. This episode of Sanity Savers for IT executives shares the key findings, including the five most lucrative IT management certifications.

10 comments
newcreationxavier
newcreationxavier

It works well then to add things up by stepping further, it doesn't bite anyway.Guess I give it a short.

surebet
surebet

I am wondering if any of these certificates is really "lucrative" surebets

Colinza
Colinza

The ITIL mindset is essential in effective service management and that is highlighted even more in these recessionary times. I see it often where a lack of this structure makes for immature processes which put an organisation at risk and leads to wastage and dissatisfaction. The focus, these days, is so bottom-line driven they can?t see that with effective ITSM they can optimise their support spend to get the biggest bang for their buck. The controls and reporting means better communication which leads to improved relations between IT and Business. Better understanding leads to agile processes able to respond to changing business climates and become that business enabler that IT is striving for. And another thing, nothing works in isolation. You tweak one process and the ripple effect can be great, or disastrous and if IT does not have a firm handle of processes and procedure the whole pack of cards comes down. Also, ITIL is a 2 way street. Business also needs to be educated into what IT can do for the organisation. They also need to realise they own IT. They are still accountable and responsible for IT. They have to show due diligence and governance. ITIL is the start of that mindset and that awakening.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Lucrative? as far as IT is concerned, in the grand scheme of lucrative professions, IT has fallen to the bottom of the list, well it still site above Judges, Psychologists and Police Officers, but IT is hardly a lucrative trade for a young person to enter anymore. Today the money is back in the medical (pharmaceutical, and nursing fields, and while still in ENTRY level IT not in the areas of supervisory positions of IT managers. If I was a young man in school and wanting training for a career that will last and pay well today, trades would be the one look at.Automotive sales have slowed, but body repair and mechanical trades are still going strong. Engineering has always been a strong, high paying occupation, both marine and civil. Electrical Engineering, prewire and installation trades are huge. There is a shortage of skilled labourer's in North America, due to the high hopes of working in IT. However, staying clean all day, sitting at a desk and finding a niche to earn millions. is quickly becoming a fading reality. It supervisors and management are in small demand, as SO many people entered the trade at the same time, they are all senior employees now and looking for low paid entry level employees to fill their old positions at lower wages so the supervisors can earn more. It's a failing industry, not that IT will go anywhere but the clamouring and begging for IT staff is dead now, it is an inundated field where 16 year old kids can offer as much as a season IT pro in many cases. I'd run screaming from IT, if I was young and new to the industry, definitely would be seeking a more lucrative industry to enter, one with stability with demand for work as well as very stable and constantly growing wages, as opposed to the ever shrinking income potential from IT.

J.D.S
J.D.S

So according to the video IT Managers are usually in small to medium businesses, which I am, so what are the best certs for this category? For example, seems PMP, CISSP, ITIL certs are overkill. What do folks think about the companion certs to these... SSCP, CAPM? Useful? Regarded? Or just best to stick to comptia certs?

itvisionary
itvisionary

I have completed ITIL training and it does work, but there are draw backs. 1. Expensive. Each of the 5 books are $100USD 2. Confusing. ITIL Foundation is very confusing for those with no prior experience with the subject matter. As an IT professional I have found MOF (Microsoft Operations Framework) to be in plain English, has a modular design and best of all, it's open source (free). MOF is universally applicable, not just proprietary. There is a MOF 4.0 certification available now as of Oct. 2008. Conclusion: ITIL works, but is only popular due to industry hype. There are other frameworks available that are effective, time tested and proven that are far less expensive. Am I a Microsoft fan boy? Not by a long shot, but I am a fan of free and effective.

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

ITIL has been around for quite some time, is very effective, and the ROI is substantial. MOF is just the MS take on ITL, but it seems overly generic and a little light on RACI. ITIL is more than hype. It actually provides a great framework that fits with other frameworks that you may be using (COBIT, Prince, etc). The other, bigger, benefit to ITIL is that you won't be railroaded later on down the line due to vendor specifications (as MS is want to do).

KSoniat
KSoniat

As your title is IT Consultant I presume you paid for the training etc yourself. You didn't state whether you were certified, are you? Do you already have a client looking for this - or is this to expand your possible client opportunities? I would be interested in how that works for you. I see many posts about those having degree or cert. but can't get job. You appear to have experience though perhaps not yet in ITIL - can you translate that into a contract/new customer. Thanks for sharing, and best of luck.

Ed.Pilling
Ed.Pilling

I have a buddy who has his ITIL cert and has been out of work for a year. One thing I noticed that CISA is not listed. I got my CISA and in 10 days I had a job and it paid twice what I was making before I was laid off.