Cloud

74% of IT leaders say security concerns restrict the move to public cloud

Public cloud adoption is growing rapidly across industries, but security concerns and misunderstandings are impeding some organizations from moving forward.

Though industries are increasingly adopting public cloud, security concerns are preventing wider adoption, according to a new report from Barracuda Networks. In a survey of 300 IT decision makers from organizations of all sizes across the US that are currently using public cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), respondents said they currently run 44% of their infrastructure in the public cloud, but expect this percentage to nearly double in the next five years.

However, 74% of IT leaders said that security concerns were restricting their organizations' migration to the public cloud.

The model of shared responsibility for cloud security is widely misunderstood among businesses, the survey found: 77% of IT decision makers said they believe that public cloud providers are responsible for securing customer data in the cloud, and 68% said they believe these providers are responsible for security customer applications as well. Despite or perhaps due to this lack of clarity, 30% of organizations reported that they have not added additional security layers to cloud deployments.

SEE: Special report: The cloud v. data center decision (free PDF)

"This survey confirms what we are hearing from customers and partners; security still remains a key concern for organizations evaluating public cloud, and there's confusion over where their part of the shared responsibility model begins and ends," said Tim Jefferson, vice president of public cloud at Barracuda, in a press release.

"Many organizations realize that their cloud deployments can be inherently more secure than an on-premises deployment because cloud providers are collectively investing more into security controls than they could on their own," Jefferson said in the release. "However, the organizations benefitting most from public cloud are those that understand that their public cloud provider is not responsible for securing data or applications."

Microsoft Azure was the most commonly-used public cloud IaaS provider among US companies, with 66% of IT decision makers' organizations on the platform, followed by Amazon Web Services (AWS) (46%) and Google Cloud platform (36%).

Earlier this week, Microsoft announced Azure confidential computing, a new feature for the cloud platform that improves security by adding encryption to data while it's in use.

On average, respondents said that their organization uses three public cloud service providers. The most common reasons cited for using more than one were that different providers offer different strengths (68%), and that the practice increases security (52%). An additional 28% of respondents said that a single provider cannot offer them everything they require from the cloud.

Want to use this data in your next business presentation? Feel free to copy and paste these top takeaways into your next slideshow.

  • IT decision makers across organizations currently run 44% of their infrastructure in the public cloud, but expect this percentage to nearly double in the next five years. -Barracuda Networks, 2017
  • 74% of IT decision makers said that security concerns were restricting their organizations' migration to the public cloud. -Barracuda Networks, 2017
  • Organizations use an average of three public cloud service providers, to improve security and tap the strengths of different providers. -Barracuda Networks, 2017

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About Alison DeNisco Rayome

Alison DeNisco Rayome is a Staff Writer for TechRepublic. She covers CXO, cybersecurity, and the convergence of tech and the workplace.

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