Microsoft

Bloated code is bad for working families

It's hard to argue with large and bloated as adjectives, but streamlined is debatable. MinWin comes in at a hefty 25MB and for that price you don't even get graphical output.

I promise that this week's title will be the only reference to K. Rudd, but not Windows.

MinWin, a slimmed down version of the Vista kernel appeared this week. The news piece that covered it began with this statement:

Microsoft admits the Windows operating system is "large" and concedes that it may even be described as "bloated", but Redmond is keen to prove that the Windows kernel is "pretty streamlined".

It's hard to argue with large and bloated as adjectives, but streamlined is debatable. MinWin comes in at a hefty 25MB and for that price you don't even get graphical output. People working on embedded systems must have been having a hearty cack, anyone that remembers the QNX floppy demo would be impressed by what they squeezed onto 1.44MB.

While it could be the first step in a new direction, it won't be, as it was conceded that MinWIn will not see the light of day.

Staying with Microsoft, a treble of video interviews with Steve Ballmer appeared this week. The first covers the iPhone , the second discusses Windows Mobile and the third one involves Ballmer discussing why Vista is great. Would you expect any less from the CEO?

There's nothing like a flame war to really get the anger flowing. This week Nick Gibson stepped into the Vim v Emacs war and took his pet python with him as he showed how to extend Vim's functionality.

A lot of people keep their source control local for very good reasons. Steven Deare spoke to CVSDude, a Brisbane based company that handles source control for Apple, Intel and the BBC and discovered how a local company can make it globally.

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