Businesses hit with 235% more cyberthreats this year

Trojans and ransomware top the list of threats with corporate targets in Q1 2019, according to a Malwarebytes report.

The top cyberthreats enterprises must look out for in 2019 At RSA 2019, Jason Escaravage from Booz Allen Hamilton explained why organizations need to have an incident response plan in place.

Cybercriminals are increasingly targeting businesses seeking a payday, according to a Thursday report from Malwarebytes. Threats aimed at corporations increased 235% between Q1 2018 and Q1 2019, with Trojans and ransomware as the most popular tools for hackers to use against businesses, the report found.

Malwarebytes compiled statistics from its Intelligence, Research, and Data Science teams with data from its consumer and business products across PCs, Macs, and mobile devices. Overall detection of threats to businesses increased by 7% over the previous quarter.

SEE: Ransomware: What IT pros need to know (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

The Trojan Emotet in particular was among the most dangerous threats faced by businesses this year, as it shifted almost completely away from consumers to enterprise targets, the report found. Detections of Trojans on business endpoints spiked more than 200% from the previous quarter, and nearly 650% year over year.

Ransomware also made a comeback against business targets in Q1 2019, the report found, increasing 195% in detections since the previous quarter, and more than 500% over the previous year. This was due in large part to a massive attack from the Troldesh ransomware against US organizations in early Q1, the report noted.

On a more positive note, as business threats rose, consumer threats dropped, decreasing 24% year over year, according to the report. Consumer detections of ransomware decreased 33% from last year, the report found.

Cryptomining attacks against consumers have also become extremely rare, while business-focused miners increased over the previous quarter, the report found.

"All but abandoning cryptomining in the face of market downturn, criminals instead looked for higher returns on investments in Q1, breaching organizations to exfiltrate valuable customer data for resale on the black market or to use in still-successful sextortion scams or other phishing campaigns," the report stated.

Looking forward, it's likely that cybercriminals will continue to focus on business targets until another easier or more profitable technique comes along, the report noted.

For more, check out How to improve cybersecurity for your business: 6 tips on TechRepublic.

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Image: iStockphoto/Artyom Medvediev