CES 2019: 80% of users don't trust IoT security, so BlackBerry created a stamp of approval

Amid consumer demand, the smartphone manufacturer released three products to keep Internet of Things data more secure.

CES chief Gary Shapiro predicts the biggest hits of 2019 show Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, talks to ZDNet's Jason Hiner about the biggest tech trends he expects to see at CES 2019.

The majority (80%) of consumers don't trust their current Internet of Things (IoT) devices to keep their data safe, according to a BlackBerry survey released on Monday. The survey, announced at CES 2019, reveals consumer doubt in Internet-connected devices such as cars, drones, TVs, smart speakers, security cameras, TVs, smartphones, and more.

Some 84% of respondents said they were more likely to choose a business or product with a solid reputation for data security and privacy, and 82% said they would support a seal or stamp of approval designating which IoT devices met certain security standards, according to the survey.

SEE: Internet of Things policy (Tech Pro Research)

Security is a major determining factor for customers who are considering buying smart devices, the survey found. More than half (58%) of respondents said they were willing to pay up to 20% more for IoT products that are more secure—and businesses are taking note.

With the IoT security market expected to hit $9.88 billion by 2025, organizations are listening to the cries of consumers. Along with the results of the survey, BlackBerry released three products designed to keep IoT devices safe from hackers.

On Sunday at CES 2019, BlackBerry introduced its Secure Enablement, Foundations, and Enterprise Feature Packs. The packages will provide IoT device manufacturers with the software needed to provide adequate security for IoT products, which means the IoT manufacturers don't have to develop the cybersecurity technology internally, according to a press release.

Products that have integrated BlackBerry's tech will be able to stamp themselves as "BlackBerry Secure."

"IoT device manufacturers can address security and privacy concerns head-on and stand out in the cluttered IoT space by bringing to market ultra-secure products that consumers, retailers, and enterprises want to buy and use," said Alex Thurber, senior vice president and general manager of mobility solutions at BlackBerry, in a statement. "This new service is a pivotal point in the company's software licensing strategy and underscores BlackBerry's evolution from providing the most secure smartphones to delivering the trusted security for all smart 'things.'"

Click here to learn more about what each Feature Pack holds and which is best for your organization.

The big takeaways for tech leaders:

  • The majority (80%) of consumers don't trust IoT devices to keep their data secure. — BlackBerry, 2019
  • Through BlackBerry's Secure Enablement, Foundations, and Enterprise Feature Packs, IoT manufacturers can effectively produce secure devices for consumers. — BlackBerry, 2019

Also see

ces-iot.jpg
Image: iStockphoto/Melpomenem

By Macy Bayern

Macy Bayern is an Associate Staff Writer for TechRepublic. A recent graduate from the University of Texas at Austin's Liberal Arts Honors Program, Macy covers tech news and trends.