Networking

D-Link, McAfee and Intel partner on new router designed to secure IoT devices

At CES 2018, D-Link announced the AC2600 Wi-Fi Router Powered by McAfee (DIR-2680), which is designed to protect smart home and IoT devices at the network layer.

Today's homes are filled with internet connected smart devices. And for many, their homes double as their workspace, meaning a security breach in the home can quickly become a corporate IT headache.

At CES 2018, D-Link unveiled the D-Link AC2600 Wi-Fi Router Powered by McAfee, the DIR-2680. The new dual-band 802.11ac router combines the Intel Home Wi-Fi Chipset WAV500 series, Intel AnyWAN SoC, and McAfee's Secure Home Platform. D-Link is marketing the new router as a way to protect IoT devices in the home "at the network level." With the growing threat from IoT malware, look for networking hardware vendors to increasingly push smart tech security as a key selling point.

SEE: Intrusion detection policy (Tech Pro Research)

dlinkdir-2680router.jpg

D-Link AC2600 Wi-Fi Router Powered by McAfee

Photo: D-Link Systems, Inc.

The DIR-2680 will be available in the second half of 2018 and all the extra security is going to cost you, well a little extra. At $249, the DIR-2680 is about $100 more than D-Link's other AC2600 router the DIR-882. CNET's Dan Dziedzic reviewed the DIR-882 in November 2017 and called it "Affordable and fast with all the latest features, like MU-MIMO, beamforming, multiple USB ports and four spatial streams."

SEE: How to secure your IoT devices from botnets and other threats (TechRepublic)

Now remember, just because you install one of these routers in your home office doesn't mean you shouldn't follow standard security best practices, like keep your software up to date, watching out for phishing attacks, and using a VPN and multi-factor authentication.

In addition to the DIR-2680, D-Link also announced the following products:

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    About Bill Detwiler

    Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

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