Dice rolls out tool to filter remote tech jobs

While 93% of technologists want to work from home, only 60% of respondents report having had that opportunity, according to Dice's 2020 Tech Salary Report.

COVID-19: Why behavior analytics can be a useful tool for employers
9:24

Dice has released a US-based "remote jobs" classification to help technologists more easily find remote roles. The career hub for technology professionals said this will help employers gain increased engagement with their newly flagged remote jobs, a necessity during COVID-19.

SEE: Life after lockdown: Your office job will never be the same--here's what to expect (cover story PDF) (TechRepublic)
 
Technologists have a "longstanding preference" for remote work, according to Dice. The Dice 2020 Tech Salary Report of 25,449 survey respondents (conducted between Oct. 14, 2019 and Dec. 17, 2019) showed that 93% of technologists want to work from home at least part of the time, with only 60% of respondents reporting they had that opportunity. However, now as technologists enter their second or third month working from their home offices, "it's clear that times have changed," Dice said.
 
"Now more than ever, businesses realize they need an online model," said Art Zeile, CEO of DHI Group, Dice's parent company, in a statement. "As a result, we're seeing a number of companies looking for technologists to accelerate these efforts remotely. We're primed to support those needs by providing easy access to post and apply to remote jobs."
 
SEE: Top 100+ tips for telecommuters and managers (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

At the same time, while studies have shown that remote work opportunities can translate into happier, more productive employees, there is a "subset of employers [that] are reluctant to offer more offsite flexibility due to the difficulties associated with communication, management, and fostering an innovative workspace," according to a new Dice blog post

"Clearly, there is a disparity between what technologists want and what some employers are willing to offer. And, for employers that are looking to hire, making their remote work policy clear can have a tremendous impact on their ability to source and hire."

In addition to offering Dice's AI-powered TalentSearch and database of technologists, the career site continues to streamline the tech hiring process, which it said can save valuable time between posting jobs, tracking applications, and hiring the ideal tech candidates. 

With the addition of Dice's new remote jobs' classification, users will "see more exposure to remote jobs, ultimately increasing discoverability and resulting in the strongest matches with specialized technologists," Dice said.
 
Technologists prefer remote jobs over those that are strictly in-office, especially jobs that utilize their skills and advance their career goals, according to Dice. Now, by applying Dice's new remote jobs filter to its job search and alerts platform, users will find remote jobs via a simple keyword search.

SEE: The vast majority of remote workers think it's too soon to return to the office (TechRepublic)

For employers looking to develop or increase their remote tech workforce, Dice recommends making sure remote hiring is a clear part of the company brand. Employers should also ensure their communications address candidates' specific questions and needs. They should also get a sense of a candidate's work ethic and approach to teamwork and collaboration, since remote work requires a higher level of communication and independent work, Dice advised.
 
"Technologists are seeking remote jobs now more than ever, a trend that will likely continue beyond the pandemic," said Christian Dwyer, chief product officer of DHI Group, in a statement. "With companies finding that technologists can succeed outside of the office environment and still prove productive, the demand and desire for remote jobs will continue into the future."

Also see

dice-technologists-work-preferences.png

Image: Dice