Enterprise Software

Do vendors read their own EULAs?

If you've ever had Safari installed under Windows then you were a software thief -- until last night.

If you've ever had Safari installed under Windows then you were a software thief — until last night.

Someone actually looked at the license terms for Safari on Windows and noticed that they had a curious restriction: "The software allows you to install and use one copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-labeled computer at a time."

Now if a company the size of Apple cannot be bothered to change its licensing terms when moving a product to a new operating system, then little wonder that users can't be bothered reading them at installation.

The wording quirk has been resolved but it still leaves the question over the enforceability of EULAs hanging.

Browser news for this week: Firefox 3's improvements to performance and memory usage were demonstrated in pretty graphs and Opera was at 100% for the Acid3 test before a bug in the test bumped them down to 99%.

While Opera and Safari are racing to become the first to release a browser that will pass Acid3 — does passing the test make any difference in the long run? CSS2 is nearly a decade old and no browser can yet boast of a full and proper implementation — most browsers have only recently passed the Acid2 test and that tests only a subset of CSS2. Making mention of the poor state of CSS3 only exacerbates the issue.

Lastly this week, if you have a dual-boot system and are looking to install Vista Service Pack 1 then be aware of the changes you may have to make. And if you are in the eastern states where daylight savings has been extended this year, then Microsoft has more patches on the way for you to allow your machine's clock to remain correct.

Who knew that an extra hour of daylight could be so hard to deal with?

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