How to write an executive resume: 3 mistakes to avoid

Writing a resume can be difficult, but avoiding these mistakes will help you differentiate yourself, according to Great Resumes Fast.

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Resumes remain one of the most important elements employers consider when looking to fill a new position, and are one of the best ways to quickly communicate your personal value and brand, according to the How to Write a Winning Executive Resume guide from Great Resumes Fast. 

"To impress employers and compete in today's job market, you need a branded and modern resume that captures attention and communicates with clarity how you add value," the guide stated. "It's impossible to do that without knowing and articulating your personal brand, value proposition, core benefits, and job target." 

SEE: 20 resume mistakes to watch out for (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

Here are three common resume mistakes that those applying to executive positions need to avoid, according to the guide:

1. Keeping it to one page

The idea that you must fit your resume onto a single page is a myth, especially for mid-career professionals and executives with lots of experience. 

"There is no resume rule that states your resume can only be one page in length," the guide stated. "There's no way you can cram 10-15 years of valuable contributions onto one page."

2. Using a resume template

Executives want their resumes to be unique, showing the value that they as an individual can offer. Using a resume template from a website won't set you apart in a group of potentially hundreds of others applying for the same job. 

"Resume templates damage your opportunity to distinguish yourself because your resume ends up looking like thousands of other resumes that employers have seen," the guide stated. "Review them for inspiration but don't copy them—it will only hurt your chances." 

3. Using content from resume samples

Similar to using a template, using generic content from online resume samples is a mistake that will make you sound like many other candidates instead of the best individual for the role. 

"You're not supposed to look and sound the same as someone else—you want to be authentic and help the employer see YOU and how YOU are a great fit for the company and the position," the guide stated. "Reusing content from online resumes takes away from your authenticity and branding."

For more, check out How to make your tech resume more appealing to hiring managers and Top 5 resume mistakes to avoid on TechRepublic. 

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Man writing resume and CV in home office with laptop. Applicant searching for new work and typing curriculum vitae for application. Job seeking, hunt and unemployment.

Image: iStockphoto/Tero Vesalainen