Open Source

Melbourne clichés: Things of stone and code

It's fair to say that the weather in Melbourne has changed as often as speaker's laptops have failed -- and I'd expect nothing less.

It's fair to say that the weather in Melbourne has changed as often as speaker's laptops have failed — and I'd expect nothing less.

The highlight of today was the chat that we had with Linus Torvalds. Torvalds said that the "Linus does not scale" problems were a thing of the past but that there maybe a problem with Andrew Morton not scaling. Other topics covered were Linux's increasing focus on being green and the vindication of his DRM prediction from last year.

At the beginning of today, the keynote was provided by Stormy Peters, who spoke on whether paid open source programmers would continue on their projects if they stopped receiving payment.

Peters suggested that most people may move off the project they are currently paid to do, but would remain in the open source community albeit on a different project.

The local man behind Samba, Andrew Tridgell, gave a talk to a jam packed theatre later in the day and demonstrated new clustered Samba features — although like most public demos it decided it wouldn't go flawlessly to plan. But it does look like a promising idea for working with terra and petabytes of data with easy backups and many failback tricks. Tridge also gave his views on how the documentation received from Microsoft has helped Samba.

In other news, it is looking increasingly likely that there will a Google Summer of Code (SoC) for the southern hemisphere. Mentioned among the motivational factors for students was the SoC shirt — it bodes well for the new Builder AU shirts we started handing out to selected people today.

Video of the above stories will appear upon our return to Sydney.

About Chris Duckett

Some would say that it is a long way from software engineering to journalism, others would correctly argue that it is a mere 10 metres according to the floor plan.During his first five years with CBS Interactive, Chris started his journalistic advent...

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