Neo4j equips educators with data graphing teaching tools

Neo4j's Educator Program offers Graph Data Modeling course slides, tutorials, and community support.

Why businesses would rather lose revenue than data While businesses don't want to lose data, 66% of business decision makers said their current IT resources do not keep up with growing technological demands.

Graph database provider Neo4j announced on Thursday the release of its Educator Program for accredited nonprofit institutions, K-12 schools, and universities. The program offers educators, both new and experienced with graphs, resources for teaching students how to make the most out of connected data. 

Neo4j's Educator Program aims to supply future developers and data scientists with the tools they need to break into the field, the press release said. 

SEE: How to build a successful data scientist career (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

Data scientists have occupied the no 1 spot on Glassdoor's Best Jobs in America list for the past four years. The popularity of these professionals is expected to only grow: By 2020, the number of jobs for US data professionals will increase by 28%, according to IBM's The Quant Crunch: How The Demand For Data Science Skills Is Disrupting The Job Market report.  

Educators will receive free license and installation of Neo4j Desktop for lab and student devices, as well as free teaching resources and materials. These resources include Intro to Neo4j course slides, which is more than seven hours of slides and guided exercises in the form of modules, graph data modeling course slides, and access to the Neo4j community support site

With Neo4j Desktop, students can learn how to manage, create, and interact with graph databases, which provides insights into various datasets. Academic institutions including California State University, Los Angeles; and Rice University have already taken interest in Neo4j's graph database curriculum.  

"An introduction to databases course is not complete without graph databases," Risa Myers, assistant teaching professor at Rice University, said in the press release.  "At Rice we believe that today's students need to know more than just the relational model to be competitive. Adding content about graph databases to the curriculum sparks interest and excitement. Even novice database users benefit from exploring connected data."

Educators interested in the program can sign up or learn more by visiting Neo4j 

For more, check out How to install graph databases to get the most benefits on TechRepublic. 

Also see 

The businesswoman standing near the display with graphs

Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto