Cloud

SAP wants manufacturers to embrace cloud computing

New products will allow manufacturers to monitor performance and collaborate with others in the supply chain via the cloud.

This article originally appeared on ZDNet.

SAP has introduced a new suite of products to make it easier for manufacturers to manage and monitor their systems and work with other parts of the supply chain, using cloud computing and the Internet of Things (IoT).

The new offerings from the European software giant include 'SAP Digital Manufacturing Cloud for execution', which integrates business systems with the shop floor, allowing for component and material-level visibility for single and global installations, while 'SAP Digital Manufacturing Cloud for insights' focuses on data-driven performance management. A 'Predictive quality' offering allows manufacturers to apply predictive algorithms that can reduce losses from defects, deficiencies or variations, and recommend corrective actions.

SAP also unveiled its manufacturing network, a cloud-based collaborative platform integrated with SAP Ariba that connects customers with manufacturing service providers, such as suppliers of 3D and CNC printing services, or material providers in order to collaborate across the entire manufacturing process, from design to part production.

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Using SAP's system, manufacturers can work together on design, highlight changes and suggest alternatives, link design discussions and data to request for quotations, and obtain price from one or multiple suppliers for parts and initiate the buying process.

Bernd Leukert, SAP executive board member for products and innovation said: "Our manufacturing cloud solutions help customers take advantage of the Industrial Internet of Things by connecting equipment, people and operations across the extended digital supply chain and tightly integrating manufacturing with business operations."

SAP also unveiled its Connected Worker Safety service, which uses information from wearables and other sensors to keep workers safe. It taps into sensors collecting data in working environments and about workers within it, such as heart rates and body temperature as well as air quality, temperature, light, and noise. Based on the sensors, the application can raise alarms on incidents such as falls, injuries, dehydration, or fatigue; the application uses one generic platform that connects all data from wearables and other IoT devices in one dashboard and is due to be released to customers this quarter.

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Image: iStockphoto/kzenon

About Steve Ranger

Steve Ranger is the UK editor-in-chief of ZDNet and TechRepublic. An award-winning journalist, Steve writes about the intersection of technology, business and culture, and regularly appears on TV and radio discussing tech issues. Previously he was th...

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