Software

Sick of Windows 10 updates taking over your PC? We've got you covered says Microsoft

The next major feature update to Windows 10, due to arrive in April, will only take PCs out of action for about 30 minutes on average, Microsoft has said.

Building a slide deck, pitch, or presentation? Here are the big takeaways:
  • Microsoft has slashed the time it takes to install major feature updates to Windows 10 PCs by carrying out more tasks in the background.
  • The next major feature update to Windows 10, due in April 2018, takes an average of 30 minutes to install, 21 minutes less than last year's Fall Creators Update.

Fed up of Windows 10 commandeering your machine while it installs major updates? Microsoft is working on that.

The next major feature update to Windows 10, due to arrive in April, will only take PCs out of action for about 30 minutes on average, Microsoft has said.

This is compared to an average of 51 minutes for the previous big feature update, the Fall Creators Update which landed towards the end of last year.

Joseph Conway, senior program manager on the Windows Fundamentals team, says Microsoft has achieved this reduction by having Windows 10 carry out more of preparation work for the upgrade in the background while the computer is still running.

SEE: System update policy (Tech Pro Research)

Conway adds this change shouldn't have a noticeable impact on the performance or battery life of the computer for most users, due to the preparatory work being executed as a low-priority process.

"We'll continue to pursue further improvements to the feature update installation process," adds Conway, pointing out the Creators Update early last year took an average of 82 minutes to install.

Microsoft's update policy was called into question recently, when a number of Windows 10 users who had chosen to defer the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (FCU) for a year were forcibly upgraded from earlier versions, despite the FCU only being released about half a year ago.

In February this year Microsoft announced that the FCU had been rolled out to 85% of PCs.

windows10updates.png

The changes to the Windows Update model.

Image: TechRepublic

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About Nick Heath

Nick Heath is chief reporter for TechRepublic. He writes about the technology that IT decision makers need to know about, and the latest happenings in the European tech scene.

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